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Definition for word about.

About-sledge A*bout"-sledge", n. The largest hammer used by smiths. --Weale., Farabout Far"*a*bout`, n. A going out of the way; a digression. [Obs.] --Fuller., Gadabout Gad"a*bout`, n. A gadder [Colloq.], Haulabout Haul"a*bout`, n. A bargelike vessel with steel hull, large hatchways, and coal transporters, for coaling war vessels from its own hold or from other colliers., Herea-bout Here"a-bout`, Hereabouts Here"a*bouts`, adv. 1. About this place; in this vicinity. 2. Concerning this. [Obs.], Knockabout Knock"a*bout`, n. 1. (Naut.) A small yacht, generally from fifteen to twenty-five feet in length, having a mainsail and a jib. All knockabouts have ballast and either a keel or centerboard. The original type was twenty-one feet in length. The next larger type is called a raceabout. 2. A knockabout performer or performance. [Theat. Slang] 3. A man hired on a sheep station to do odd jobs. [Colloq., Australia], Knockabout Knock"a*bout`, a. 1. Marked by knocking about or roughness. 2. Of noisy and violent character. [Theat. Slang] 3. Characterized by, or suitable for, knocking about, or traveling or wandering hither and thither. 4. That does odd jobs; -- said of a class of hands or laborers on a sheep station. [Collog., Australia], Marabout Marabout", n. [F., from Pg. marabuto, Ar. mor[=a]bit. Cf. Maravedi.] A Mohammedan saint; especially, one who claims to work cures supernaturally., Raceabout Race"a*bout`, n. (Naut.) A small sloop-rigged racing yacht carrying about six hundred square feet of sail, distinguished from a knockabout by having a short bowsprit., Right-about Right"-a*bout`, n. [Right, adv. + about, adv.] A turning directly about by the right, so as to face in the opposite direction; also, the quarter directly opposite; as, to turn to the right-about. To send to the right-about, to cause to turn toward the opposite point or quarter; -- hence, of troops, to cause to turn and retreat. [Colloq.] --Sir W. Scott., Round Round, prep. On every side of, so as to encompass or encircle; around; about; as, the people atood round him; to go round the city; to wind a cable round a windlass. The serpent Error twines round human hearts. --Cowper. Round about, an emphatic form for round or about. ``Moses . . . set them [The elders] round about the tabernacle.' --Num. xi. 24. To come round, to gain the consent of, or circumvent, (a person) by flattery or deception. [Colloq.], Roundabout Round"a*bout`, a. 1. Circuitous; going round; indirect; as, roundabout speech. We have taken a terrible roundabout road. --Burke. 2. Encircling; enveloping; comprehensive. ``Large, sound, roundabout sense.' --Locke., Roundabout Round"a*bout`, n. 1. A horizontal wheel or frame, commonly with wooden horses, etc., on which children ride; a merry-go-round. --Smart. 2. A dance performed in a circle. --Goldsmith. 3. A short, close jacket worn by boys, sailors, etc. 4. A state or scene of constant change, or of recurring labor and vicissitude. --Cowper., Roundaboutness Round"a*bout`ness, n. The quality of being roundabout; circuitousness., Roustabout Roust"a*bout`, n. [Etymol. uncertain.] A laborer, especially a deck hand, on a river steamboat, who moves the cargo, loads and unloads wood, and the like; in an opprobrious sense, a shiftless vagrant who lives by chance jobs. [Western U.S.], Stirabout Stir"a*bout`, n. A dish formed of oatmeal boiled in water to a certain consistency and frequently stirred, or of oatmeal and dripping mixed together and stirred about in a pan; a hasty pudding., Thereabout There"a*bout`, Thereabouts There"a*bouts`, adv. [The latter spelling is less proper, but more commonly used.] 1. Near that place. 2. Near that number, degree, or quantity; nearly; as, ten men, or thereabouts. Five or six thousand horse . . . or thereabouts. --Shak. Some three months since, or thereabout. --Suckling. 3. Concerning that; about that. [R.] What will ye dine? I will go thereabout. --Chaucer. They were much perplexed thereabout. --Luke xxiv. 4., Thereabout There"a*bout`, Thereabouts There"a*bouts`, adv. [The latter spelling is less proper, but more commonly used.] 1. Near that place. 2. Near that number, degree, or quantity; nearly; as, ten men, or thereabouts. Five or six thousand horse . . . or thereabouts. --Shak. Some three months since, or thereabout. --Suckling. 3. Concerning that; about that. [R.] What will ye dine? I will go thereabout. --Chaucer. They were much perplexed thereabout. --Luke xxiv. 4., Beat Beat, v. i. 1. To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly. The men of the city . . . beat at the door. --Judges. xix. 22. 2. To move with pulsation or throbbing. A thousand hearts beat happily. --Byron. 3. To come or act with violence; to dash or fall with force; to strike anything, as, rain, wind, and waves do. Sees rolling tempests vainly beat below. --Dryden. They [winds] beat at the crazy casement. --Longfellow. The sun beat upon the head of Jonah, that he fainted, and wisbed in himself to die. --Jonah iv. 8. Public envy seemeth to beat chiefly upon ministers. --Bacon. 4. To be in agitation or doubt. [Poetic] To still my beating mind. --Shak. 5. (Naut.) To make progress against the wind, by sailing in a zigzag line or traverse. 6. To make a sound when struck; as, the drums beat. 7. (Mil.) To make a succession of strokes on a drum; as, the drummers beat to call soldiers to their quarters. 8. (Acoustics & Mus.) To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; -- said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison. A beating wind (Naut.), a wind which necessitates tacking in order to make progress. To beat about, to try to find; to search by various means or ways. --Addison. To beat about the bush, to approach a subject circuitously. To beat up and down (Hunting), to run first one way and then another; -- said of a stag. To beat up for recruits, to go diligently about in order to get helpers or participators in an enterprise., Beat Beat, v. i. 1. To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly. The men of the city . . . beat at the door. --Judges. xix. 22. 2. To move with pulsation or throbbing. A thousand hearts beat happily. --Byron. 3. To come or act with violence; to dash or fall with force; to strike anything, as, rain, wind, and waves do. Sees rolling tempests vainly beat below. --Dryden. They [winds] beat at the crazy casement. --Longfellow. The sun beat upon the head of Jonah, that he fainted, and wisbed in himself to die. --Jonah iv. 8. Public envy seemeth to beat chiefly upon ministers. --Bacon. 4. To be in agitation or doubt. [Poetic] To still my beating mind. --Shak. 5. (Naut.) To make progress against the wind, by sailing in a zigzag line or traverse. 6. To make a sound when struck; as, the drums beat. 7. (Mil.) To make a succession of strokes on a drum; as, the drummers beat to call soldiers to their quarters. 8. (Acoustics & Mus.) To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; -- said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison. A beating wind (Naut.), a wind which necessitates tacking in order to make progress. To beat about, to try to find; to search by various means or ways. --Addison. To beat about the bush, to approach a subject circuitously. To beat up and down (Hunting), to run first one way and then another; -- said of a stag. To beat up for recruits, to go diligently about in order to get helpers or participators in an enterprise., Haw Haw, v. t. To cause to turn, as a team, to the near side, or toward the driver; as, to haw a team of oxen. To haw and gee, or To haw and gee about, to lead this way and that at will; to lead by the nose; to master or control. [Colloq.], Haw Haw, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Hawed; p. pr. & vb. n. Hawing.] [Written also hoi.] [Perhaps connected with here, hither; cf., however, F. huhau, hue, interj. used in turning a horse to the right, G. hott, h["u], interj. used in calling to a horse.] To turn to the near side, or toward the driver; -- said of cattle or a team: a word used by teamsters in guiding their teams, and most frequently in the imperative. See Gee. To haw and gee, or To haw and gee about, to go from one thing to another without good reason; to have no settled purpose; to be irresolute or unstable. [Colloq.], Hem Hem, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hemmed; p. pr. & vb. n. Hemming.] 1. To form a hem or border to; to fold and sew down the edge of. --Wordsworth. 2. To border; to edge All the skirt about Was hemmed with golden fringe. --Spenser. To hem about, around, or in, to inclose and confine; to surround; to environ. ``With valiant squadrons round about to hem.' --Fairfax. ``Hemmed in to be a spoil to tyranny.' --Daniel. To hem out, to shut out. ``You can not hem me out of London.' --J. Webster., Knock Knock, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Knocked; p. pr. & vb. n. Knocking.] [OE. knoken, AS. cnocian, cnucian; prob. of imitative origin; cf. Sw. knacka.Cf. Knack.] 1. To drive or be driven against something; to strike against something; to clash; as, one heavy body knocks against another. --Bacon. 2. To strike or beat with something hard or heavy; to rap; as, to knock with a club; to knock on the door. For harbor at a thousand doors they knocked. --Dryden. Seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you. --Matt. vii. 7. To knock about, to go about, taking knocks or rough usage; to wander about; to saunter. [Colloq.] ``Knocking about town.' --W. Irving. To knock up, to fail of strength; to become wearied or worn out, as with labor; to give out. ``The horses were beginning to knock up under the fatigue of such severe service.' --De Quincey., Lay Lay, v. i. 1. To produce and deposit eggs. 2. (Naut.) To take a position; to come or go; as, to lay forward; to lay aloft. 3. To lay a wager; to bet. To lay about, or To lay about one, to strike vigorously in all directions. --J. H. Newman. To lay at, to strike or strike at. --Spenser. To lay for, to prepare to capture or assault; to lay wait for. [Colloq.] --Bp Hall. To lay in for, to make overtures for; to engage or secure the possession of. [Obs.] ``I have laid in for these.' --Dryden. To lay on, to strike; to beat; to attack. --Shak. To lay out, to purpose; to plan; as, he lays out to make a journey., Lay Lay, v. i. 1. To produce and deposit eggs. 2. (Naut.) To take a position; to come or go; as, to lay forward; to lay aloft. 3. To lay a wager; to bet. To lay about, or To lay about one, to strike vigorously in all directions. --J. H. Newman. To lay at, to strike or strike at. --Spenser. To lay for, to prepare to capture or assault; to lay wait for. [Colloq.] --Bp Hall. To lay in for, to make overtures for; to engage or secure the possession of. [Obs.] ``I have laid in for these.' --Dryden. To lay on, to strike; to beat; to attack. --Shak. To lay out, to purpose; to plan; as, he lays out to make a journey., Roll Roll, v. i. 1. To move, as a curved object may, along a surface by rotation without sliding; to revolve upon an axis; to turn over and over; as, a ball or wheel rolls on the earth; a body rolls on an inclined plane. And her foot, look you, is fixed upon a spherical stone, which rolls, and rolls, and rolls. --Shak. 2. To move on wheels; as, the carriage rolls along the street. ``The rolling chair.' --Dryden. 3. To be wound or formed into a cylinder or ball; as, the cloth rolls unevenly; the snow rolls well. 4. To fall or tumble; -- with over; as, a stream rolls over a precipice. 5. To perform a periodical revolution; to move onward as with a revolution; as, the rolling year; ages roll away. 6. To turn; to move circularly. And his red eyeballs roll with living fire. --Dryden. 7. To move, as waves or billows, with alternate swell and depression. What different sorrows did within thee roll. --Prior. 8. To incline first to one side, then to the other; to rock; as, there is a great difference in ships about rolling; in a general semse, to be tossed about. Twice ten tempestuous nights I rolled. --Pope. 9. To turn over, or from side to side, while lying down; to wallow; as, a horse rolls. 10. To spread under a roller or rolling-pin; as, the paste rolls well. 11. To beat a drum with strokes so rapid that they can scarcely be distinguished by the ear. 12. To make a loud or heavy rumbling noise; as, the thunder rolls. To roll about, to gad abroad. [Obs.] Man shall not suffer his wife go roll about. --Chaucer., Right-about Right"-a*bout`, n. [Right, adv. + about, adv.] A turning directly about by the right, so as to face in the opposite direction; also, the quarter directly opposite; as, to turn to the right-about. To send to the right-about, to cause to turn toward the opposite point or quarter; -- hence, of troops, to cause to turn and retreat. [Colloq.] --Sir W. Scott., Throw Throw, v. i. To perform the act of throwing or casting; to cast; specifically, to cast dice. To throw about, to cast about; to try expedients. [R.], Whereabout Where"a*bout`, Whereabouts Where"a*bouts`, adv. 1. About where; near what or which place; -- used interrogatively and relatively; as, whereabouts did you meet him? Note: In this sense, whereabouts is the common form. 2. Concerning which; about which. ``The object whereabout they are conversant.' --Hooker.

Explination we found from Wikipedia for about.

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