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Definition for word Abstract.

Abstract Ab"stract` (#; 277), a. [L. abstractus, p. p. of abstrahere to draw from, separate; ab, abs + trahere to draw. See Trace.] 1. Withdraw; separate. [Obs.] The more abstract . . . we are from the body. --Norris. 2. Considered apart from any application to a particular object; separated from matter; existing in the mind only; as, abstract truth, abstract numbers. Hence: ideal; abstruse; difficult. 3. (Logic) (a) Expressing a particular property of an object viewed apart from the other properties which constitute it; -- opposed to concrete; as, honesty is an abstract word. --J. S. Mill. (b) Resulting from the mental faculty of abstraction; general as opposed to particular; as, ``reptile' is an abstract or general name. --Locke. A concrete name is a name which stands for a thing; an abstract name which stands for an attribute of a thing. A practice has grown up in more modern times, which, if not introduced by Locke, has gained currency from his example, of applying the expression ``abstract name' to all names which are the result of abstraction and generalization, and consequently to all general names, instead of confining it to the names of attributes. --J. S. Mill. 4. Abstracted; absent in mind. ``Abstract, as in a trance.' --Milton. An abstract idea (Metaph.), an idea separated from a complex object, or from other ideas which naturally accompany it; as the solidity of marble when contemplated apart from its color or figure. Abstract terms, those which express abstract ideas, as beauty, whiteness, roundness, without regarding any object in which they exist; or abstract terms are the names of orders, genera or species of things, in which there is a combination of similar qualities. Abstract numbers (Math.), numbers used without application to things, as 6, 8, 10; but when applied to any thing, as 6 feet, 10 men, they become concrete. Abstract or Pure mathematics. See Mathematics., Abstract Ab"stract` (#; 277), a. [L. abstractus, p. p. of abstrahere to draw from, separate; ab, abs + trahere to draw. See Trace.] 1. Withdraw; separate. [Obs.] The more abstract . . . we are from the body. --Norris. 2. Considered apart from any application to a particular object; separated from matter; existing in the mind only; as, abstract truth, abstract numbers. Hence: ideal; abstruse; difficult. 3. (Logic) (a) Expressing a particular property of an object viewed apart from the other properties which constitute it; -- opposed to concrete; as, honesty is an abstract word. --J. S. Mill. (b) Resulting from the mental faculty of abstraction; general as opposed to particular; as, ``reptile' is an abstract or general name. --Locke. A concrete name is a name which stands for a thing; an abstract name which stands for an attribute of a thing. A practice has grown up in more modern times, which, if not introduced by Locke, has gained currency from his example, of applying the expression ``abstract name' to all names which are the result of abstraction and generalization, and consequently to all general names, instead of confining it to the names of attributes. --J. S. Mill. 4. Abstracted; absent in mind. ``Abstract, as in a trance.' --Milton. An abstract idea (Metaph.), an idea separated from a complex object, or from other ideas which naturally accompany it; as the solidity of marble when contemplated apart from its color or figure. Abstract terms, those which express abstract ideas, as beauty, whiteness, roundness, without regarding any object in which they exist; or abstract terms are the names of orders, genera or species of things, in which there is a combination of similar qualities. Abstract numbers (Math.), numbers used without application to things, as 6, 8, 10; but when applied to any thing, as 6 feet, 10 men, they become concrete. Abstract or Pure mathematics. See Mathematics., Abstract Ab*stract", v. t. To perform the process of abstraction. [R.] I own myself able to abstract in one sense. --Berkeley., Abstract Ab"stract`, n. [See Abstract, a.] 1. That which comprises or concentrates in itself the essential qualities of a larger thing or of several things. Specifically: A summary or an epitome, as of a treatise or book, or of a statement; a brief. An abstract of every treatise he had read. --Watts. Man, the abstract Of all perfection, which the workmanship Of Heaven hath modeled. --Ford. 2. A state of separation from other things; as, to consider a subject in the abstract, or apart from other associated things. 3. An abstract term. The concretes ``father' and ``son' have, or might have, the abstracts ``paternity' and ``filiety.' --J. S. Mill. 4. (Med.) A powdered solid extract of a vegetable substance mixed with sugar of milk in such proportion that one part of the abstract represents two parts of the original substance. Abstract of title (Law), an epitome of the evidences of ownership. Syn: Abridgment; compendium; epitome; synopsis. See Abridgment., Abstract Ab*stract", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Abstracted; p. pr. & vb. n. Abstracting.] [See Abstract, a.] 1. To withdraw; to separate; to take away. He was incapable of forming any opinion or resolution abstracted from his own prejudices. --Sir W. Scott. 2. To draw off in respect to interest or attention; as, his was wholly abstracted by other objects. The young stranger had been abstracted and silent. --Blackw. Mag. 3. To separate, as ideas, by the operation of the mind; to consider by itself; to contemplate separately, as a quality or attribute. --Whately. 4. To epitomize; to abridge. --Franklin. 5. To take secretly or dishonestly; to purloin; as, to abstract goods from a parcel, or money from a till. Von Rosen had quietly abstracted the bearing-reins from the harness. --W. Black. 6. (Chem.) To separate, as the more volatile or soluble parts of a substance, by distillation or other chemical processes. In this sense extract is now more generally used.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for Abstract.

- abstract may refer to: abstract (law), a summary of a legal document. abstract (summary), in scientific publishing. abstract art , artistic
- abstract art uses a visual language of form, color and line to create a composition which may exist with a degree of independence from
- abstract expressionism is an american post–world war ii art movement in american painting, developed in new york in the 1940s it was the
- an abstract is a brief summary of a research article, thesis , review, conference proceeding or any in-depth analysis of a particular
- abstract and concrete are classifications that denote whether a term describes an object with a physical referent or one with no physical
- in algebra , which is a broad division of mathematics , abstract algebra is a common name for the sub-area that studies algebraic structure
- for example, abstracting a leather soccer ball to the more general idea of a ball retains only the information on general ball attributes
- an abstract strategy game is a strategy game that minimizes luck and does not rely on a theme almost all abstract strategy games will
- the abstract formalization of the group axioms, detached as it is from the concrete nature of any particular group and its operation,
- such articles begin with an abstract , which is a one-to-four-paragraph summary of the paper. the introduction describes the background


We found definition for Abstract you search from dictionaries , wikipedia mentions for Abstract.

Similar meaning for word Abstract.



Help for word abstract-id.

Abstract Ab"stract` (#; 277), a. [L. abstractus, p. p. of abstrahere to draw from, separate; ab, abs + trahere to draw. See Trace.] 1. Withdraw; separate. [Obs.] The more abstract . . . we are from the body. --Norris. 2. Considered apart from any application to a particular object; separated from matter; existing in the mind only; as, abstract truth, abstract numbers. Hence: ideal; abstruse; difficult. 3. (Logic) (a) Expressing a particular property of an object viewed apart from the other properties which constitute it; -- opposed to concrete; as, honesty is an abstract word. --J. S. Mill. (b) Resulting from the mental faculty of abstraction; general as opposed to particular; as, ``reptile' is an abstract or general name. --Locke. A concrete name is a name which stands for a thing; an abstract name which stands for an attribute of a thing. A practice has grown up in more modern times, which, if not introduced by Locke, has gained currency from his example, of applying the expression ``abstract name' to all names which are the result of abstraction and generalization, and consequently to all general names, instead of confining it to the names of attributes. --J. S. Mill. 4. Abstracted; absent in mind. ``Abstract, as in a trance.' --Milton. An abstract idea (Metaph.), an idea separated from a complex object, or from other ideas which naturally accompany it; as the solidity of marble when contemplated apart from its color or figure. Abstract terms, those which express abstract ideas, as beauty, whiteness, roundness, without regarding any object in which they exist; or abstract terms are the names of orders, genera or species of things, in which there is a combination of similar qualities. Abstract numbers (Math.), numbers used without application to things, as 6, 8, 10; but when applied to any thing, as 6 feet, 10 men, they become concrete. Abstract or Pure mathematics. See Mathematics.


Wiki for abstract-id.

- abstract_id 812925 'time-varying conditional covariances in tests of asset pricing models,' journal of financial economics 24, (1989)
- abstract_id 1757982 how financial regulation might harness the power of markets, in rules for growth: promoting innovation and growth
- abstract_id 2307939 , accessdate , quote , last1 bartram , first1 söhnke m. last , first , authorlink , coauthors burns, natasha; helwege
- com/science/handbooks/15734498 abstract & toc. www.dictionaryofeconomics.com/article?id pde2008_t000042&q term%20structure%20of%20
- abstract_id 1945392 , title military-intelligence convergence and the law of the title 10/title 50 debate , year 2012 , author robert m.
- references : abstract_id 1887824 . http://papers. ssrn. com/sol3/papers. cfm? abstract_id 1878734 . http://papers. ssrn. com/sol3/papers.
- abstract_id 1923340 'honey, it's all the buzz: regulating neighborhood bee hives' boston college of environmental affairs law review, 2011
- abstract_id 1805904 ssrn page for fetal pain, abortion, viability and the constitution )http://papers. ssrn. com/sol3/papers. cfm?
- abstract_id 842284 deconstruction's legal career, 27 cardozo law review 719 (2005). available at http://papers. ssrn. com/sol3/papers.
- representative academic publications: abstract_id 2221525 “ sudan, the united states, and the international criminal court: a tense
-



Help for word Abstract-number.

Number Num"ber, n. [OE. nombre, F. nombre, L. numerus; akin to Gr. ? that which is dealt out, fr. ? to deal out, distribute. See Numb, Nomad, and cf. Numerate, Numero, Numerous.] 1. That which admits of being counted or reckoned; a unit, or an aggregate of units; a numerable aggregate or collection of individuals; an assemblage made up of distinct things expressible by figures. 2. A collection of many individuals; a numerous assemblage; a multitude; many. Ladies are always of great use to the party they espouse, and never fail to win over numbers. --Addison. 3. A numeral; a word or character denoting a number; as, to put a number on a door. 4. Numerousness; multitude. Number itself importeth not much in armies where the people are of weak courage. --Bacon. 5. The state or quality of being numerable or countable. Of whom came nations, tribes, people, and kindreds out of number. --2 Esdras iii. 7. 6. Quantity, regarded as made up of an aggregate of separate things. 7. That which is regulated by count; poetic measure, as divisions of time or number of syllables; hence, poetry, verse; -- chiefly used in the plural. I lisped in numbers, for the numbers came. --Pope. 8. (Gram.) The distinction of objects, as one, or more than one (in some languages, as one, or two, or more than two), expressed (usually) by a difference in the form of a word; thus, the singular number and the plural number are the names of the forms of a word indicating the objects denoted or referred to by the word as one, or as more than one. 9. (Math.) The measure of the relation between quantities or things of the same kind; that abstract species of quantity which is capable of being expressed by figures; numerical value. Abstract number, Abundant number, Cardinal number, etc. See under Abstract, Abundant, etc. In numbers, in numbered parts; as, a book published in numbers.


Wiki for Abstract-number.



Help for word Abstract-numbers.

Abstract Ab"stract` (#; 277), a. [L. abstractus, p. p. of abstrahere to draw from, separate; ab, abs + trahere to draw. See Trace.] 1. Withdraw; separate. [Obs.] The more abstract . . . we are from the body. --Norris. 2. Considered apart from any application to a particular object; separated from matter; existing in the mind only; as, abstract truth, abstract numbers. Hence: ideal; abstruse; difficult. 3. (Logic) (a) Expressing a particular property of an object viewed apart from the other properties which constitute it; -- opposed to concrete; as, honesty is an abstract word. --J. S. Mill. (b) Resulting from the mental faculty of abstraction; general as opposed to particular; as, ``reptile' is an abstract or general name. --Locke. A concrete name is a name which stands for a thing; an abstract name which stands for an attribute of a thing. A practice has grown up in more modern times, which, if not introduced by Locke, has gained currency from his example, of applying the expression ``abstract name' to all names which are the result of abstraction and generalization, and consequently to all general names, instead of confining it to the names of attributes. --J. S. Mill. 4. Abstracted; absent in mind. ``Abstract, as in a trance.' --Milton. An abstract idea (Metaph.), an idea separated from a complex object, or from other ideas which naturally accompany it; as the solidity of marble when contemplated apart from its color or figure. Abstract terms, those which express abstract ideas, as beauty, whiteness, roundness, without regarding any object in which they exist; or abstract terms are the names of orders, genera or species of things, in which there is a combination of similar qualities. Abstract numbers (Math.), numbers used without application to things, as 6, 8, 10; but when applied to any thing, as 6 feet, 10 men, they become concrete. Abstract or Pure mathematics. See Mathematics., Number Num"ber, n. [OE. nombre, F. nombre, L. numerus; akin to Gr. ? that which is dealt out, fr. ? to deal out, distribute. See Numb, Nomad, and cf. Numerate, Numero, Numerous.] 1. That which admits of being counted or reckoned; a unit, or an aggregate of units; a numerable aggregate or collection of individuals; an assemblage made up of distinct things expressible by figures. 2. A collection of many individuals; a numerous assemblage; a multitude; many. Ladies are always of great use to the party they espouse, and never fail to win over numbers. --Addison. 3. A numeral; a word or character denoting a number; as, to put a number on a door. 4. Numerousness; multitude. Number itself importeth not much in armies where the people are of weak courage. --Bacon. 5. The state or quality of being numerable or countable. Of whom came nations, tribes, people, and kindreds out of number. --2 Esdras iii. 7. 6. Quantity, regarded as made up of an aggregate of separate things. 7. That which is regulated by count; poetic measure, as divisions of time or number of syllables; hence, poetry, verse; -- chiefly used in the plural. I lisped in numbers, for the numbers came. --Pope. 8. (Gram.) The distinction of objects, as one, or more than one (in some languages, as one, or two, or more than two), expressed (usually) by a difference in the form of a word; thus, the singular number and the plural number are the names of the forms of a word indicating the objects denoted or referred to by the word as one, or as more than one. 9. (Math.) The measure of the relation between quantities or things of the same kind; that abstract species of quantity which is capable of being expressed by figures; numerical value. Abstract number, Abundant number, Cardinal number, etc. See under Abstract, Abundant, etc. In numbers, in numbered parts; as, a book published in numbers.


Wiki for Abstract-numbers.



Help for word Abstract-of-title.

Abstract Ab"stract`, n. [See Abstract, a.] 1. That which comprises or concentrates in itself the essential qualities of a larger thing or of several things. Specifically: A summary or an epitome, as of a treatise or book, or of a statement; a brief. An abstract of every treatise he had read. --Watts. Man, the abstract Of all perfection, which the workmanship Of Heaven hath modeled. --Ford. 2. A state of separation from other things; as, to consider a subject in the abstract, or apart from other associated things. 3. An abstract term. The concretes ``father' and ``son' have, or might have, the abstracts ``paternity' and ``filiety.' --J. S. Mill. 4. (Med.) A powdered solid extract of a vegetable substance mixed with sugar of milk in such proportion that one part of the abstract represents two parts of the original substance. Abstract of title (Law), an epitome of the evidences of ownership. Syn: Abridgment; compendium; epitome; synopsis. See Abridgment.


Wiki for Abstract-of-title.

- a property abstract is a collection of legal documents that chronicles activities abstract of title: an abstract of title is the condensed
- an abstractor of title is a person who prepares and certifies the condensed history (known as an abstract of title ) of the ownership of a
- the american land title association or alta, is a national trade association representing the interests of the abstract of title and
- in law , an abstract is a brief statement that contains the most important points abstract of title: section , type law , date november 2007
- originally, it was an arabic language abstract noun meaning ' later, it came to be used as the title of certain rulers who claimed
- an abstract of a book lately published, full title an abstract of a book lately published; entitled, a treatise of human nature, &c.
- csa illumina also known as csa illustrata (formerly cambridge scientific abstracts) appears to have ceased under this title in december, 1987 (v.
- scopus is a bibliographic database containing abstracts and citation s for it covers nearly 21,000 titles from over 5,000 publishers, of
- -abstract of judgment -abstract of title -abuse of discretion - of legal aid costs -certificate of title -certified check -certiorari
- a : abstract of title acknowledgment (law) acre - a measure of land. ad valorem tax adjustable-rate mortgage (arm) administrator/
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Help for word Abstract-terms.

Abstract Ab"stract` (#; 277), a. [L. abstractus, p. p. of abstrahere to draw from, separate; ab, abs + trahere to draw. See Trace.] 1. Withdraw; separate. [Obs.] The more abstract . . . we are from the body. --Norris. 2. Considered apart from any application to a particular object; separated from matter; existing in the mind only; as, abstract truth, abstract numbers. Hence: ideal; abstruse; difficult. 3. (Logic) (a) Expressing a particular property of an object viewed apart from the other properties which constitute it; -- opposed to concrete; as, honesty is an abstract word. --J. S. Mill. (b) Resulting from the mental faculty of abstraction; general as opposed to particular; as, ``reptile' is an abstract or general name. --Locke. A concrete name is a name which stands for a thing; an abstract name which stands for an attribute of a thing. A practice has grown up in more modern times, which, if not introduced by Locke, has gained currency from his example, of applying the expression ``abstract name' to all names which are the result of abstraction and generalization, and consequently to all general names, instead of confining it to the names of attributes. --J. S. Mill. 4. Abstracted; absent in mind. ``Abstract, as in a trance.' --Milton. An abstract idea (Metaph.), an idea separated from a complex object, or from other ideas which naturally accompany it; as the solidity of marble when contemplated apart from its color or figure. Abstract terms, those which express abstract ideas, as beauty, whiteness, roundness, without regarding any object in which they exist; or abstract terms are the names of orders, genera or species of things, in which there is a combination of similar qualities. Abstract numbers (Math.), numbers used without application to things, as 6, 8, 10; but when applied to any thing, as 6 feet, 10 men, they become concrete. Abstract or Pure mathematics. See Mathematics.


Wiki for Abstract-terms.

- abstract imagists is a term derived from a 1961 exhibition in the guggenheim museum , new york called american abstract expressionists and
- in abstract algebra , the term torsion refers to elements of finite order in groups and to elements of module s annihilated by regular
- in traditional philosophy a 'concrete term' is defined as a word which denotes a particular person or thing, and an 'abstract term' is
- in mathematics , the term simple is used to describe an algebraic structure which in some sense cannot be see also : category:abstract algebra.
- in abstract algebra , the term associator is used in different ways as a measure of the nonassociativity of an algebraic structure.
- otium, a latin abstract term, has a variety of meanings, including leisure time in which a person can enjoy eating, playing, resting,
- in mathematics , and more specifically in abstract algebra , the term algebraic structure generally refers to an arbitrary set (called
- abstract and concrete are classifications that denote whether a term describes an object with a physical referent or one with no physical
- abstract expressionism is an american post–world war ii art movement in american although the term 'abstract expressionism' was first
- in computer science , an abstract semantic graph (asg) or term graph is a form of abstract syntax in which an expression of a formal or



Help for word abstracte.

Abstract Ab*stract", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Abstracted; p. pr. & vb. n. Abstracting.] [See Abstract, a.] 1. To withdraw; to separate; to take away. He was incapable of forming any opinion or resolution abstracted from his own prejudices. --Sir W. Scott. 2. To draw off in respect to interest or attention; as, his was wholly abstracted by other objects. The young stranger had been abstracted and silent. --Blackw. Mag. 3. To separate, as ideas, by the operation of the mind; to consider by itself; to contemplate separately, as a quality or attribute. --Whately. 4. To epitomize; to abridge. --Franklin. 5. To take secretly or dishonestly; to purloin; as, to abstract goods from a parcel, or money from a till. Von Rosen had quietly abstracted the bearing-reins from the harness. --W. Black. 6. (Chem.) To separate, as the more volatile or soluble parts of a substance, by distillation or other chemical processes. In this sense extract is now more generally used., Abstracted Ab*stract"ed, a. 1. Separated or disconnected; withdrawn; removed; apart. The evil abstracted stood from his own evil. --Milton. 2. Separated from matter; abstract; ideal. [Obs.] 3. Abstract; abstruse; difficult. [Obs.] --Johnson. 4. Inattentive to surrounding objects; absent in mind. ``An abstracted scholar.' --Johnson., Abstractedly Ab*stract"ed*ly, adv. In an abstracted manner; separately; with absence of mind., Abstractedness Ab*stract"ed*ness, n. The state of being abstracted; abstract character., Abstracter Ab*stract"er, n. One who abstracts, or makes an abstract., Inabstracted In`ab*stract"ed, a. Not abstracted.


Wiki for abstracte.

- de abdij van tongerloo , , , , abstracte films getekend op pellicule , , , , l'ommegang. 15 juillet 1930 , , , , défilé des combattants
- references : jp/en/technology/review/abstracte-41-5-264. html . url http://www. tepco. co. jp/en/torikumi/thermal/popup_01. html#s01 , title
- external links : jp/en/technology/review/abstracte-45-4-16. html 'development status of the h-iib launch vehicle'. mitsubishi heavy
- external links: jp/en/technology/review/abstracte-36-2-48. html mitsubishi heavy industries technical review 'application of mh2000 commercial
- wentinck, ch„vijf abstracte schilders, amerikanen in stedelijk museum“ elseviers weekblad, zaterdag 29 januari, 1955, p.  21 frankenstein,
-