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Definition for word action.

Abaction Ab*ac"tion ([a^]b*[a^]k"sh[u^]n), n. Stealing cattle on a large scale. [Obs.], Abreaction Ab`re*ac"tion, n. [Pref. ab- + reaction, after G. Abreagirung.] (Psychotherapy) See Catharsis, below., Abstractional Ab*strac"tion*al, a. Pertaining to abstraction., Abstractionist Ab*strac"tion*ist, n. An idealist. --Emerson., Actionable Ac"tion*a*ble, a. [Cf. LL. actionabilis. See Action.] That may be the subject of an action or suit at law; as, to call a man a thief is actionable., Actionably Ac"tion*a*bly, adv. In an actionable manner., Actionary Ac"tion*a*ry, Actionist Ac"tion*ist, n. [Cf. F. actionnaire.] (Com.) A shareholder in joint-stock company. [Obs.], Actionary Ac"tion*a*ry, Actionist Ac"tion*ist, n. [Cf. F. actionnaire.] (Com.) A shareholder in joint-stock company. [Obs.], Actionless Ac"tion*less, a. Void of action., Attraction At*trac"tion, n. [L. attractio: cf. F. attraction.] 1. (Physics) An invisible power in a body by which it draws anything to itself; the power in nature acting mutually between bodies or ultimate particles, tending to draw them together, or to produce their cohesion or combination, and conversely resisting separation. Note: Attraction is exerted at both sensible and insensible distances, and is variously denominated according to its qualities or phenomena. Under attraction at sensible distances, there are, -- (1.) Attraction of gravitation, which acts at all distances throughout the universe, with a force proportional directly to the product of the masses of the bodies and inversely to the square of their distances apart. (2.) Magnetic, diamagnetic, and electrical attraction, each of which is limited in its sensible range and is polar in its action, a property dependent on the quality or condition of matter, and not on its quantity. Under attraction at insensible distances, there are, -- (1.) Adhesive attraction, attraction between surfaces of sensible extent, or by the medium of an intervening substance. (2.) Cohesive attraction, attraction between ultimate particles, whether like or unlike, and causing simply an aggregation or a union of those particles, as in the absorption of gases by charcoal, or of oxygen by spongy platinum, or the process of solidification or crystallization. The power in adhesive attraction is strictly the same as that of cohesion. (3.) Capillary attraction, attraction causing a liquid to rise, in capillary tubes or interstices, above its level outside, as in very small glass tubes, or a sponge, or any porous substance, when one end is inserted in the liquid. It is a special case of cohesive attraction. (4.) Chemical attraction, or affinity, that peculiar force which causes elementary atoms, or groups of atoms, to unite to form molecules. 2. The act or property of attracting; the effect of the power or operation of attraction. --Newton. 3. The power or act of alluring, drawing to, inviting, or engaging; an attractive quality; as, the attraction of beauty or eloquence. 4. That which attracts; an attractive object or feature. Syn: Allurement; enticement; charm., Alkaline Al"ka*line (?; 277), a. [Cf. F. alcalin.] Of or pertaining to an alkali or to alkalies; having the properties of an alkali. Alkaline earths, certain substances, as lime, baryta, strontia, and magnesia, possessing some of the qualities of alkalies. Alkaline metals, potassium, sodium, c[ae]sium, lithium, rubidium. Alkaline reaction, a reaction indicating alkalinity, as by the action on limits, turmeric, etc., Amicable Am"i*ca*ble, a. [L. amicabilis, fr. amicus friend, fr. amare to love. See Amiable.] Friendly; proceeding from, or exhibiting, friendliness; after the manner of friends; peaceable; as, an amicable disposition, or arrangement. That which was most remarkable in this contest was . . . the amicable manner in which it was managed. --Prideoux. Amicable action (Law.), an action commenced and prosecuted by amicable consent of the parties, for the purpose of obtaining a decision of the court on some matter of law involved in it. --Bouvier. --Burrill. Amicable numbers (Math.), two numbers, each of which is equal to the sum of all the aliquot parts of the other. Syn: Friendly; peaceable; kind; harmonious. Usage: Amicable, Friendly. Neither of these words denotes any great warmth of affection, since friendly has by no means the same strength as its noun friendship. It does, however, imply something of real cordiality; while amicable supposes very little more than that the parties referred to are not disposed to quarrel. Hence, we speak of amicable relations between two countries, an amicable adjustment of difficulties. ``Those who entertain friendly feelings toward each other can live amicably together.', Traction Trac"tion, n. [L. trahere, tractum, to draw: cf. F. traction.] 1. The act of drawing, or the state of being drawn; as, the traction of a muscle. 2. Specifically, the act of drawing a body along a plane by motive power, as the drawing of a carriage by men or horses, the towing of a boat by a tug. 3. Attraction; a drawing toward. [R.] 4. The adhesive friction of a wheel on a rail, a rope on a pulley, or the like. --Knight. Angle of traction (Mech.), the angle made with a given plane by the line of direction in which a tractive force acts. Traction engine, a locomotive for drawing vehicles on highways or in the fields., Arefaction Ar`e*fac"tion, n. [L. arefacere to dry.] The act of drying, or the state of growing dry. The arefaction of the earth. --Sir M. Hale., Assuefaction As`sue*fac"tion, n. [L. assuefacere to accustom to; assuetus (p. p. of assuescere to accustom to) + facere to make; cf. OF. assuefaction.] The act of accustoming, or the state of being accustomed; habituation. [Obs.] Custom and studies efform the soul like wax, and by assuefaction introduce a nature. --Jer. Taylor., Attraction At*trac"tion, n. [L. attractio: cf. F. attraction.] 1. (Physics) An invisible power in a body by which it draws anything to itself; the power in nature acting mutually between bodies or ultimate particles, tending to draw them together, or to produce their cohesion or combination, and conversely resisting separation. Note: Attraction is exerted at both sensible and insensible distances, and is variously denominated according to its qualities or phenomena. Under attraction at sensible distances, there are, -- (1.) Attraction of gravitation, which acts at all distances throughout the universe, with a force proportional directly to the product of the masses of the bodies and inversely to the square of their distances apart. (2.) Magnetic, diamagnetic, and electrical attraction, each of which is limited in its sensible range and is polar in its action, a property dependent on the quality or condition of matter, and not on its quantity. Under attraction at insensible distances, there are, -- (1.) Adhesive attraction, attraction between surfaces of sensible extent, or by the medium of an intervening substance. (2.) Cohesive attraction, attraction between ultimate particles, whether like or unlike, and causing simply an aggregation or a union of those particles, as in the absorption of gases by charcoal, or of oxygen by spongy platinum, or the process of solidification or crystallization. The power in adhesive attraction is strictly the same as that of cohesion. (3.) Capillary attraction, attraction causing a liquid to rise, in capillary tubes or interstices, above its level outside, as in very small glass tubes, or a sponge, or any porous substance, when one end is inserted in the liquid. It is a special case of cohesive attraction. (4.) Chemical attraction, or affinity, that peculiar force which causes elementary atoms, or groups of atoms, to unite to form molecules. 2. The act or property of attracting; the effect of the power or operation of attraction. --Newton. 3. The power or act of alluring, drawing to, inviting, or engaging; an attractive quality; as, the attraction of beauty or eloquence. 4. That which attracts; an attractive object or feature. Syn: Allurement; enticement; charm., Attraction At*trac"tion, n. [L. attractio: cf. F. attraction.] 1. (Physics) An invisible power in a body by which it draws anything to itself; the power in nature acting mutually between bodies or ultimate particles, tending to draw them together, or to produce their cohesion or combination, and conversely resisting separation. Note: Attraction is exerted at both sensible and insensible distances, and is variously denominated according to its qualities or phenomena. Under attraction at sensible distances, there are, -- (1.) Attraction of gravitation, which acts at all distances throughout the universe, with a force proportional directly to the product of the masses of the bodies and inversely to the square of their distances apart. (2.) Magnetic, diamagnetic, and electrical attraction, each of which is limited in its sensible range and is polar in its action, a property dependent on the quality or condition of matter, and not on its quantity. Under attraction at insensible distances, there are, -- (1.) Adhesive attraction, attraction between surfaces of sensible extent, or by the medium of an intervening substance. (2.) Cohesive attraction, attraction between ultimate particles, whether like or unlike, and causing simply an aggregation or a union of those particles, as in the absorption of gases by charcoal, or of oxygen by spongy platinum, or the process of solidification or crystallization. The power in adhesive attraction is strictly the same as that of cohesion. (3.) Capillary attraction, attraction causing a liquid to rise, in capillary tubes or interstices, above its level outside, as in very small glass tubes, or a sponge, or any porous substance, when one end is inserted in the liquid. It is a special case of cohesive attraction. (4.) Chemical attraction, or affinity, that peculiar force which causes elementary atoms, or groups of atoms, to unite to form molecules. 2. The act or property of attracting; the effect of the power or operation of attraction. --Newton. 3. The power or act of alluring, drawing to, inviting, or engaging; an attractive quality; as, the attraction of beauty or eloquence. 4. That which attracts; an attractive object or feature. Syn: Allurement; enticement; charm., Gravitation Grav"i*ta"tion, n. [Cf. F. gravitation. See Gravity.] 1. The act of gravitating. 2. (Pysics) That species of attraction or force by which all bodies or particles of matter in the universe tend toward each other; called also attraction of gravitation, universal gravitation, and universal gravity. See Attraction, and Weight. Law of gravitation, that law in accordance with which gravitation acts, namely, that every two bodies or portions of matter in the universe attract each other with a force proportional directly to the quantity of matter they contain, and inversely to the squares of their distances., Chemical Chem"ic*al, a. Pertaining to chemistry; characterized or produced by the forces and operations of chemistry; employed in the processes of chemistry; as, chemical changes; chemical combinations. Chemical attraction or affinity. See under Attraction., Attraction sphere At*trac"tion sphere 1. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The central mass of the aster in mitotic cell division; centrosphere. (b) Less often, the mass of archoplasm left by the aster in the resting cell. 2. (Bot.) A small body situated on or near the nucleus in the cells of some of the lower plants, consisting of two centrospheres containing centrosomes. It exercises an important function in mitosis., Steam engine Steam" en"gine An engine moved by steam. Note: In its most common forms its essential parts are a piston, a cylinder, and a valve gear. The piston works in the cylinder, to which steam is admitted by the action of the valve gear, and communicates motion to the machinery to be actuated. Steam engines are thus classified: 1. According to the wat the steam is used or applied, as condencing, noncondencing, compound, double-acting, single-acting, triple-expansion, etc. 2. According to the motion of the piston, as reciprocating, rotary, etc. 3. According to the motion imparted by the engine, as rotative and nonrotative. 4. According to the arrangement of the engine, as stationary, portable, and semiportable engines, beam engine, oscillating engine, direct-acting and back-acting engines, etc. 5. According to their uses, as portable, marine, locomotive, pumping, blowing, winding, and stationary engines. Locomotive and portable engines are usually high-pressure, noncondencing, rotative, and direct-acting. Marine engines are high or low pressure, rotative, and generally condencing, double-acting, and compound. Paddle engines are generally beam, side?lever, oscillating, or direct-acting. Screw engines are generally direct-acting, back-acting, or oscillating. Stationary engines belong to various classes, but are generally rotative. A horizontal or inclined stationary steam engine is called a left-hand or a right-hand engine when the crank shaft and driving pulley are on the left-hand side, or the right-hand side, respectively, or the engine, to a person looking at them from the cylinder, and is said to run forward or backward when the crank traverses the upward half, or lower half, respectively, of its path, while the piston rod makes its stroke outward from the cylinder. A marine engine, or the engine of a locomotive, is said to run forward when its motion is such as would propel the vessel or the locomotive forward. Steam engines are further classified as double-cylinder, disk, semicylinder, trunk engines, etc. Machines, such as cranes, hammers, etc., of which the steam engine forms a part, are called steam cranes, steam hammers, etc. See Illustration in Appendix. Back-acting, or Back-action, steam engine, a steam engine in which the motion is transmitted backward from the crosshead to a crank which is between the crosshead and the cylinder, or beyond the cylinder. Portable steam engine, a steam engine combined with, and attached to, a boiler which is mounted on wheels so as to admit of easy transportation; -- used for driving machinery in the field, as trashing machines, draining pumps, etc. Semiportable steam engine, a steam engine combined with, and attached to, a steam boiler, but not mounted on wheels., Benefaction Ben`e*fac"tion, n. [L. benefactio, fr. benefacere to do good to one; bene well + facere to do. See Benefit.] 1. The act of conferring a benefit. --Johnson. 2. A benefit conferred; esp. a charitable donation. Syn: Gift; present; gratuity; boon; alms., Blowpipe Blow"pipe`, n. 1. A tube for directing a jet of air into a fire or into the flame of a lamp or candle, so as to concentrate the heat on some object. Note: It is called a mouth blowpipe when used with the mouth; but for both chemical and industrial purposes, it is often worked by a bellows or other contrivance. The common mouth blowpipe is a tapering tube with a very small orifice at the end to be inserted in the flame. The oxyhydrogen blowpipe, invented by Dr. Hare in 1801, is an instrument in which oxygen and hydrogen, taken from separate reservoirs, in the proportions of two volumes of hydrogen to one of oxygen, are burned in a jet, under pressure. It gives a heat that will consume the diamond, fuse platinum, and dissipate in vapor, or in gaseous forms, most known substances. 2. A blowgun; a blowtube. Blowpipe analysis (Chem.), analysis by means of the blowpipe. Blowpipe reaction (Chem.), the characteristic behavior of a substance subjected to a test by means of the blowpipe., Breech action Breech action The breech mechanism in breech-loading small arms and certain special guns, as automatic and machine guns; -- used frequently in referring to the method by which the movable barrels of breech-loading shotguns are locked, unlocked, or rotated to loading position., Attraction At*trac"tion, n. [L. attractio: cf. F. attraction.] 1. (Physics) An invisible power in a body by which it draws anything to itself; the power in nature acting mutually between bodies or ultimate particles, tending to draw them together, or to produce their cohesion or combination, and conversely resisting separation. Note: Attraction is exerted at both sensible and insensible distances, and is variously denominated according to its qualities or phenomena. Under attraction at sensible distances, there are, -- (1.) Attraction of gravitation, which acts at all distances throughout the universe, with a force proportional directly to the product of the masses of the bodies and inversely to the square of their distances apart. (2.) Magnetic, diamagnetic, and electrical attraction, each of which is limited in its sensible range and is polar in its action, a property dependent on the quality or condition of matter, and not on its quantity. Under attraction at insensible distances, there are, -- (1.) Adhesive attraction, attraction between surfaces of sensible extent, or by the medium of an intervening substance. (2.) Cohesive attraction, attraction between ultimate particles, whether like or unlike, and causing simply an aggregation or a union of those particles, as in the absorption of gases by charcoal, or of oxygen by spongy platinum, or the process of solidification or crystallization. The power in adhesive attraction is strictly the same as that of cohesion. (3.) Capillary attraction, attraction causing a liquid to rise, in capillary tubes or interstices, above its level outside, as in very small glass tubes, or a sponge, or any porous substance, when one end is inserted in the liquid. It is a special case of cohesive attraction. (4.) Chemical attraction, or affinity, that peculiar force which causes elementary atoms, or groups of atoms, to unite to form molecules. 2. The act or property of attracting; the effect of the power or operation of attraction. --Newton. 3. The power or act of alluring, drawing to, inviting, or engaging; an attractive quality; as, the attraction of beauty or eloquence. 4. That which attracts; an attractive object or feature. Syn: Allurement; enticement; charm., Capillary Cap"il*la*ry (k[a^]p"[i^]l*l[asl]*r[y^] or k[.a]*p[i^]l"l[.a]*r[y^]; 277), a. [L. capillaris, fr. capillus hair. Cf. Capillaire.] 1. Resembling a hair; fine; minute; very slender; having minute tubes or interspaces; having very small bore; as, the capillary vessels of animals and plants. 2. Pertaining to capillary tubes or vessels; as, capillary action. Capillary attraction, Capillary repulsion, the apparent attraction or repulsion between a solid and liquid caused by capillarity. See Capillarity, and Attraction. Capillarity tubes. See the Note under Capillarity., Attraction At*trac"tion, n. [L. attractio: cf. F. attraction.] 1. (Physics) An invisible power in a body by which it draws anything to itself; the power in nature acting mutually between bodies or ultimate particles, tending to draw them together, or to produce their cohesion or combination, and conversely resisting separation. Note: Attraction is exerted at both sensible and insensible distances, and is variously denominated according to its qualities or phenomena. Under attraction at sensible distances, there are, -- (1.) Attraction of gravitation, which acts at all distances throughout the universe, with a force proportional directly to the product of the masses of the bodies and inversely to the square of their distances apart. (2.) Magnetic, diamagnetic, and electrical attraction, each of which is limited in its sensible range and is polar in its action, a property dependent on the quality or condition of matter, and not on its quantity. Under attraction at insensible distances, there are, -- (1.) Adhesive attraction, attraction between surfaces of sensible extent, or by the medium of an intervening substance. (2.) Cohesive attraction, attraction between ultimate particles, whether like or unlike, and causing simply an aggregation or a union of those particles, as in the absorption of gases by charcoal, or of oxygen by spongy platinum, or the process of solidification or crystallization. The power in adhesive attraction is strictly the same as that of cohesion. (3.) Capillary attraction, attraction causing a liquid to rise, in capillary tubes or interstices, above its level outside, as in very small glass tubes, or a sponge, or any porous substance, when one end is inserted in the liquid. It is a special case of cohesive attraction. (4.) Chemical attraction, or affinity, that peculiar force which causes elementary atoms, or groups of atoms, to unite to form molecules. 2. The act or property of attracting; the effect of the power or operation of attraction. --Newton. 3. The power or act of alluring, drawing to, inviting, or engaging; an attractive quality; as, the attraction of beauty or eloquence. 4. That which attracts; an attractive object or feature. Syn: Allurement; enticement; charm., Chose Chose, n.; pl. Choses. [F., fr. L. causa cause, reason. See Cause.] (Law) A thing; personal property. Chose in action, a thing of which one has not possession or actual enjoyment, but only a right to it, or a right to demand it by action at law, and which does not exist at the time in specie; a personal right to a thing not reduced to possession, but recoverable by suit at law; as a right to recover money due on a contract, or damages for a tort, which can not be enforced against a reluctant party without suit. Chose in possession, a thing in possession, as distinguished from a thing in action. Chose local, a thing annexed to a place, as a mill. Chose transitory, a thing which is movable. --Cowell. Blount., Chylifaction Chyl`i*fac"tion, n. [Chyle + L. facere to make.] (Physiol.) The act or process by which chyle is formed from food in animal bodies; chylification, -- a digestive process., Coaction Co*ac"tion, n. [L. coactio.] Force; compulsion, either in restraining or impelling. --Sojth.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for action.

- action is a public bus service operating in canberra , act , australia . it is a division of the territory and municipal services
- action may refer to: action (philosophy) action (physics), an attribute of the development of a system over a period of time. action (fiction)
- action! may refer to: action! (programming language), a programming language for the atari 8-bit family of microcomputers
- action film is a film genre in which one or more hero es are thrust into a series of challenges that typically include physical feats,
- the action game is a video game genre that emphasizes physical challenges, including hand–eye coordination and reaction-time.
- action is one of the fiction-writing modes authors use to present fiction. action includes movement, not meaning like standing up, but
- in algebra and geometry , a group action is a description of symmetries of objects using groups . the essential elements of the object
- action role-playing games (abbreviated action rpg, action/rpg, or arpg) form a loosely defined sub-genre of role-playing video game s that
- an action-adventure game (also known as 'arcade adventure game') is a video game that combines elements of the adventure game genre with
- a class action, class suit, or representative action is a lawsuit where a person sues a group of people, a group of people sues another


We found definition for action you search from dictionaries , wikipedia mentions for action.

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Help for word actiona.

Abstractional Ab*strac"tion*al, a. Pertaining to abstraction., Actionable Ac"tion*a*ble, a. [Cf. LL. actionabilis. See Action.] That may be the subject of an action or suit at law; as, to call a man a thief is actionable., Actionably Ac"tion*a*bly, adv. In an actionable manner., Actionary Ac"tion*a*ry, Actionist Ac"tion*ist, n. [Cf. F. actionnaire.] (Com.) A shareholder in joint-stock company. [Obs.], Factionary Fac"tion*a*ry, a. [Cf. F. factionnaire, L. factionarius the head of a company of charioteers.] Belonging to a faction; being a partisan; taking sides. [Obs.] Always factionary on the party of your general. --Shak., Fractional Frac"tion*al, a. 1. Of or pertaining to fractions or a fraction; constituting a fraction; as, fractional numbers. 2. Relatively small; inconsiderable; insignificant; as, a fractional part of the population. Fractional crystallization (Chem.), a process of gradual and approximate purification and separation, by means of repeated solution and crystallization therefrom. Fractional currency, small coin, or paper notes, in circulation, of less value than the monetary unit. Fractional distillation (Chem.), a process of distillation so conducted that a mixture of liquids, differing considerably from each other in their boiling points, can be separated into its constituents., Fractional Frac"tion*al, a. 1. Of or pertaining to fractions or a fraction; constituting a fraction; as, fractional numbers. 2. Relatively small; inconsiderable; insignificant; as, a fractional part of the population. Fractional crystallization (Chem.), a process of gradual and approximate purification and separation, by means of repeated solution and crystallization therefrom. Fractional currency, small coin, or paper notes, in circulation, of less value than the monetary unit. Fractional distillation (Chem.), a process of distillation so conducted that a mixture of liquids, differing considerably from each other in their boiling points, can be separated into its constituents., Fractional Frac"tion*al, a. 1. Of or pertaining to fractions or a fraction; constituting a fraction; as, fractional numbers. 2. Relatively small; inconsiderable; insignificant; as, a fractional part of the population. Fractional crystallization (Chem.), a process of gradual and approximate purification and separation, by means of repeated solution and crystallization therefrom. Fractional currency, small coin, or paper notes, in circulation, of less value than the monetary unit. Fractional distillation (Chem.), a process of distillation so conducted that a mixture of liquids, differing considerably from each other in their boiling points, can be separated into its constituents., Distillation Dis`til*la"tion, n. [F. distillation, L. destillatio.] 1. The act of falling in drops, or the act of pouring out in drops. 2. That which falls in drops. [R.] --Johnson 3. (Chem.) The separation of the volatile parts of a substance from the more fixed; specifically, the operation of driving off gas or vapor from volatile liquids or solids, by heat in a retort or still, and the condensation of the products as far as possible by a cool receiver, alembic, or condenser; rectification; vaporization; condensation; as, the distillation of illuminating gas and coal, of alcohol from sour mash, or of boric acid in steam. Note: The evaporation of water, its condensation into clouds, and its precipitation as rain, dew, frost, snow, or hail, is an illustration of natural distillation. 4. The substance extracted by distilling. --Shak. Destructive distillation (Chem.), the distillation, especially of complex solid substances, so that the ultimate constituents are separated or evolved in new compounds, -- usually requiring a high degree of heat; as, the destructive distillation of soft coal or of wood. Dry distillation, the distillation of substances by themselves, or without the addition of water or of other volatile solvent; as, the dry distillation of citric acid. Fractional distillation. (Chem.) See under Fractional., Fractional Frac"tion*al, a. 1. Of or pertaining to fractions or a fraction; constituting a fraction; as, fractional numbers. 2. Relatively small; inconsiderable; insignificant; as, a fractional part of the population. Fractional crystallization (Chem.), a process of gradual and approximate purification and separation, by means of repeated solution and crystallization therefrom. Fractional currency, small coin, or paper notes, in circulation, of less value than the monetary unit. Fractional distillation (Chem.), a process of distillation so conducted that a mixture of liquids, differing considerably from each other in their boiling points, can be separated into its constituents., Fractionally Frac"tion*al*ly, adv. By fractions or separate portions; as, to distill a liquid fractionally, that is, so as to separate different portions., Fractionary Frac"tion*a*ry, a. Fractional. [Obs.], Fractionate Frac"tion*ate, v. t. To separate into different portions or fractions, as in the distillation of liquids., Pactional Pac"tion*al, a. Of the nature of, or by means of, a paction. --Bp. Sanderson., Reactionary Re*ac"tion*a*ry, n.; pl. Reactionaries. One who favors reaction, or seeks to undo political progress or revolution., Reactionary Re*ac"tion*a*ry, a. Being, causing, or favoring reaction; as, reactionary movements., Reactionary Re*ac"tion*a*ry, n.; pl. Reactionaries. One who favors reaction, or seeks to undo political progress or revolution., Tractional Trac"tion*al, a. Of or relating to traction.


Wiki for actiona.

- date march 2010 the masada action and defense movement. (mouvement d'action et défense masada. was a name used to claim responsibility for
- pentalenolactone f synthase contains fe(ii), and ascorbate is needed for its actiona.. references : external links : pentalenolactone+f+
- exitwhen eventa or eventb or eventc; xxx exits eventa: actiona eventb: actionb eventc: actionc endexit; exitwhen is used to specify the



Help for word Actionable.

Actionable Ac"tion*a*ble, a. [Cf. LL. actionabilis. See Action.] That may be the subject of an action or suit at law; as, to call a man a thief is actionable.


Wiki for Actionable.

- date january 2008 in the law, a cause of action is a set of facts sufficient to justify a right to sue to obtain money, property, or the
- litigators , john grisham's 25th novel , the litigators civil action , the film of the same name , a civil action a lawsuit or (very rarely
- the legal usage , complaints in other contexts , complaint (disambiguation) in legal terminology, a complaint is any formal legal document
- date january 2013 date february 2013 name action item , img , img_capt , img_size , landscape , background group_or_band , birth_name
- actionable offenses: indecent phonograph recordings from the 1890s is a compilation of jokes and stories recorded to wax cylinder s during
- actionable information logistics is the supply of immediately available information to users necessary for them to deal with the situation
- double actionability is a doctrine of private international law which holds that an action for an alleged tort committed in a foreign
- in the united states, a citizen grand jury is a non-actionable, non-governmental organization that assumes a responsibility upon itself to
- tawpi was a membership association that facilitated the peer-to-peer exchange of actionable information, ideas and best practices on the
- shareplanner is a real-time trading network for actionable trade setups, watch-lists, stock screens, and social network of traders for



Help for word Actionably.

Actionably Ac"tion*a*bly, adv. In an actionable manner.


Wiki for Actionably.

- 'fundamentally and actionably undervalued or overvalued' against the american dollar for an 18-month period; and (2) should there be
- is actionably indecent does not turn on whether the station that broadcast it or the program happens to be popular in its particular market.'
- the us federal communications commission (fcc) has ruled that the song is 'actionably indecent', concluding that 'despite english accent
- justice antonin scalia , in the majority opinion, wrote: 'the fcc’s new policy and its order finding the broadcasts at issue actionably
- the us federal communications commission (fcc) has ruled that the term is actionably indecent. wkrk-fm in detroit, michigan has twice
- actionable offenses: indecent phonograph recordings from the 1890s is a compilation of jokes and stories recorded to wax cylinder s during
- com/dictionary/english/actionable-intelligence 'the collins dictionary : actionable intelligence'- category:intelligence (information
- actionable information logistics is the supply of immediately available information to users necessary for them to deal with the situation
- date january 2008 in the law, a cause of action is a set of facts sufficient to justify a right to sue to obtain money, property, or the
- double actionability is a doctrine of private international law which holds that an action for an alleged tort committed in a foreign



Help for word actional.

Abstractional Ab*strac"tion*al, a. Pertaining to abstraction., Fractional Frac"tion*al, a. 1. Of or pertaining to fractions or a fraction; constituting a fraction; as, fractional numbers. 2. Relatively small; inconsiderable; insignificant; as, a fractional part of the population. Fractional crystallization (Chem.), a process of gradual and approximate purification and separation, by means of repeated solution and crystallization therefrom. Fractional currency, small coin, or paper notes, in circulation, of less value than the monetary unit. Fractional distillation (Chem.), a process of distillation so conducted that a mixture of liquids, differing considerably from each other in their boiling points, can be separated into its constituents., Fractional Frac"tion*al, a. 1. Of or pertaining to fractions or a fraction; constituting a fraction; as, fractional numbers. 2. Relatively small; inconsiderable; insignificant; as, a fractional part of the population. Fractional crystallization (Chem.), a process of gradual and approximate purification and separation, by means of repeated solution and crystallization therefrom. Fractional currency, small coin, or paper notes, in circulation, of less value than the monetary unit. Fractional distillation (Chem.), a process of distillation so conducted that a mixture of liquids, differing considerably from each other in their boiling points, can be separated into its constituents., Fractional Frac"tion*al, a. 1. Of or pertaining to fractions or a fraction; constituting a fraction; as, fractional numbers. 2. Relatively small; inconsiderable; insignificant; as, a fractional part of the population. Fractional crystallization (Chem.), a process of gradual and approximate purification and separation, by means of repeated solution and crystallization therefrom. Fractional currency, small coin, or paper notes, in circulation, of less value than the monetary unit. Fractional distillation (Chem.), a process of distillation so conducted that a mixture of liquids, differing considerably from each other in their boiling points, can be separated into its constituents., Distillation Dis`til*la"tion, n. [F. distillation, L. destillatio.] 1. The act of falling in drops, or the act of pouring out in drops. 2. That which falls in drops. [R.] --Johnson 3. (Chem.) The separation of the volatile parts of a substance from the more fixed; specifically, the operation of driving off gas or vapor from volatile liquids or solids, by heat in a retort or still, and the condensation of the products as far as possible by a cool receiver, alembic, or condenser; rectification; vaporization; condensation; as, the distillation of illuminating gas and coal, of alcohol from sour mash, or of boric acid in steam. Note: The evaporation of water, its condensation into clouds, and its precipitation as rain, dew, frost, snow, or hail, is an illustration of natural distillation. 4. The substance extracted by distilling. --Shak. Destructive distillation (Chem.), the distillation, especially of complex solid substances, so that the ultimate constituents are separated or evolved in new compounds, -- usually requiring a high degree of heat; as, the destructive distillation of soft coal or of wood. Dry distillation, the distillation of substances by themselves, or without the addition of water or of other volatile solvent; as, the dry distillation of citric acid. Fractional distillation. (Chem.) See under Fractional., Fractional Frac"tion*al, a. 1. Of or pertaining to fractions or a fraction; constituting a fraction; as, fractional numbers. 2. Relatively small; inconsiderable; insignificant; as, a fractional part of the population. Fractional crystallization (Chem.), a process of gradual and approximate purification and separation, by means of repeated solution and crystallization therefrom. Fractional currency, small coin, or paper notes, in circulation, of less value than the monetary unit. Fractional distillation (Chem.), a process of distillation so conducted that a mixture of liquids, differing considerably from each other in their boiling points, can be separated into its constituents., Fractionally Frac"tion*al*ly, adv. By fractions or separate portions; as, to distill a liquid fractionally, that is, so as to separate different portions., Pactional Pac"tion*al, a. Of the nature of, or by means of, a paction. --Bp. Sanderson., Tractional Trac"tion*al, a. Of or relating to traction.


Wiki for actional.

- in january 2006 progress software acquired mountain view based actional corporation, which itself was the merger between actional
- system for x window ', is an interface builder for motif originally developed by visual edge software (later renamed to actional corporation ).
- health behavior change refers to the motivational, volitional, and actional processes of abandoning such health-compromising behaviors in
- in the postintentional preactional stage, individuals are labeled 'intenders', whereas in the actional stage they are labeled 'actors'.
- the companies involved in defining ws-trust were: actional corporation, bea systems, inc., computer associates international, inc.,
- interbehaviorism as developed by kantor was characterized as 'field-theoretic, not lineal-mechanistic, self-actional, or mediational; a
- in october 2012 trilogy acquired four progress software businesses – sonic, savvion, actional and dxsi - and created a new company called
- however, doctrine lacks the actional aspect of ideology. it is mainly a theoretical discourse, which 'refers to a coherent sum of
- this modal semiotics opens the way to the final phase that studies how passions modify actional and cognitive performance of subjects
- the other argument claims that any indetermination of our actions issues from an 'actional pathway' in which there is an indeterministic break?



Help for word Actionary.

Actionary Ac"tion*a*ry, Actionist Ac"tion*ist, n. [Cf. F. actionnaire.] (Com.) A shareholder in joint-stock company. [Obs.]


Wiki for Actionary.

- date october 2012 the various communities of indigenous pre-arab, semitic and often neo-aramaic-speaking people of; iraq , syria , iran ,



Help for word actione.

Factioner Fac"tion*er (-?r), n. One of a faction. --Abp. Bancroft.


Wiki for actione.

- the crypts of lieberkühn (intestinal glands) are named for him; he first described these in detail in de fabrica et actione vollorum
- praesens prudenter agit/ne futura actionẼ deturpet (“from the experience of the past, the present acts prudently, lest it spoil future actions”).
- conference , slogan , song , fightsong , motto virtitus laus in actione , motto_translation virtue in action , accreditation north
- austin also cites ludovicus cressolius 's 1620 book vacationes autumales sive de perfecta oratoris, actione, et pronuntiatione and the
- 'hymnus pro gratiarum actione', children’s choir, mixed choir, and instrumental ensemble, 1979. ' 'symphony no. 5', 1981. ' 'letters to
- de actione catholica in corpore christi , volume xiii , pages 321–372 title de nativitate ecclesiae ex corde iesu in cruce , volume xiii ,
- venite laudemus dominum iubilemus petrae iesu nostro praeoccupemus vultum eius in actione gratiarum in canticis iubilemus ei quoniam
- he also referred to it as the 'new science of power and action', (latin 'potentia et effectu' and 'potentia et actione'). and it is from
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