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Definition for word aired.

Bellows Bel"lows, n. sing. & pl. [OE. bely, below, belly, bellows, AS. b[ae]lg, b[ae]lig, bag, bellows, belly. Bellows is prop. a pl. and the orig. sense is bag. See Belly.] An instrument, utensil, or machine, which, by alternate expansion and contraction, or by rise and fall of the top, draws in air through a valve and expels it through a tube for various purposes, as blowing fires, ventilating mines, or filling the pipes of an organ with wind. Bellows camera, in photography, a form of camera, which can be drawn out like an accordion or bellows. Hydrostatic bellows. See Hydrostatic. A pair of bellows, the ordinary household instrument for blowing fires, consisting of two nearly heart-shaped boards with handles, connected by leather, and having a valve and tube., Affair Af*fair" ([a^]f*f[^a]r"), n. [OE. afere, affere, OF. afaire, F. affaire, fr. a faire to do; L.. ad + facere to do. See Fact, and cf. Ado.] 1. That which is done or is to be done; matter; concern; as, a difficult affair to manage; business of any kind, commercial, professional, or public; -- often in the plural. ``At the head of affairs.' --Junius. ``A talent for affairs.' --Prescott. 2. Any proceeding or action which it is wished to refer to or characterize vaguely; as, an affair of honor, i. e., a duel; an affair of love, i. e., an intrigue. 3. (Mil.) An action or engagement not of sufficient magnitude to be called a battle. 4. Action; endeavor. [Obs.] And with his best affair Obeyed the pleasure of the Sun. --Chapman. 5. A material object (vaguely designated). A certain affair of fine red cloth much worn and faded. --Hawthorne., 14. (Paint.) (a) The representation or reproduction of the effect of the atmospheric medium through which every object in nature is viewed. --New Am. Cyc. (b) Carriage; attitude; action; movement; as, the head of that portrait has a good air. --Fairholt. 15. (Man.) The artificial motion or carriage of a horse. Note: Air is much used adjectively or as the first part of a compound term. In most cases it might be written indifferently, as a separate limiting word, or as the first element of the compound term, with or without the hyphen; as, air bladder, air-bladder, or airbladder; air cell, air-cell, or aircell; air-pump, or airpump. Air balloon. See Balloon. Air bath. (a) An apparatus for the application of air to the body. (b) An arrangement for drying substances in air of any desired temperature. Air castle. See Castle in the air, under Castle. Air compressor, a machine for compressing air to be used as a motive power. Air crossing, a passage for air in a mine. Air cushion, an air-tight cushion which can be inflated; also, a device for arresting motion without shock by confined air. Air fountain, a contrivance for producing a jet of water by the force of compressed air. Air furnace, a furnace which depends on a natural draft and not on blast. Air line, a straight line; a bee line. Hence Air-line, adj.; as, air-line road. Air lock (Hydr. Engin.), an intermediate chamber between the outer air and the compressed-air chamber of a pneumatic caisson. --Knight. Air port (Nav.), a scuttle or porthole in a ship to admit air. Air spring, a spring in which the elasticity of air is utilized. Air thermometer, a form of thermometer in which the contraction and expansion of air is made to measure changes of temperature. Air threads, gossamer. Air trap, a contrivance for shutting off foul air or gas from drains, sewers, etc.; a stench trap. Air trunk, a pipe or shaft for conducting foul or heated air from a room. Air valve, a valve to regulate the admission or egress of air; esp. a valve which opens inwardly in a steam boiler and allows air to enter. Air way, a passage for a current of air; as the air way of an air pump; an air way in a mine. In the air. (a) Prevalent without traceable origin or authority, as rumors. (b) Not in a fixed or stable position; unsettled. (c) (Mil.) Unsupported and liable to be turned or taken in flank; as, the army had its wing in the air. To take air, to be divulged; to be made public. To take the air, to go abroad; to walk or ride out., Vapor Va"por, n. [OE. vapour, OF. vapour, vapor, vapeur, F. vapeur, L. vapor; probably for cvapor, and akin to Gr. ? smoke, ? to breathe forth, Lith. kvepti to breathe, smell, Russ. kopote fine soot. Cf. Vapid.] [Written also vapour.] 1. (Physics) Any substance in the gaseous, or a["e]riform, state, the condition of which is ordinarily that of a liquid or solid. Note: The term vapor is sometimes used in a more extended sense, as identical with gas; and the difference between the two is not so much one of kind as of degree, the latter being applied to all permanently elastic fluids except atmospheric air, the former to those elastic fluids which lose that condition at ordinary temperatures. The atmosphere contains more or less vapor of water, a portion of which, on a reduction of temperature, becomes condensed into liquid water in the form of rain or dew. The vapor of water produced by boiling, especially in its economic relations, is called steam. Vapor is any substance in the gaseous condition at the maximum of density consistent with that condition. This is the strict and proper meaning of the word vapor. --Nichol. 2. In a loose and popular sense, any visible diffused substance floating in the atmosphere and impairing its transparency, as smoke, fog, etc. The vapour which that fro the earth glood [glided]. --Chaucer. Fire and hail; snow and vapors; stormy wind fulfilling his word. --Ps. cxlviii. 8. 3. Wind; flatulence. [Obs.] --Bacon. 4. Something unsubstantial, fleeting, or transitory; unreal fancy; vain imagination; idle talk; boasting. For what is your life? It is even a vapor, that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away. --James iv. 14. 5. pl. An old name for hypochondria, or melancholy; the blues. ``A fit of vapors.' --Pope. 6. (Pharm.) A medicinal agent designed for administration in the form of inhaled vapor. --Brit. Pharm. Vapor bath. (a) A bath in vapor; the application of vapor to the body, or part of it, in a close place; also, the place itself. (b) (Chem.) A small metallic drying oven, usually of copper, for drying and heating filter papers, precipitates, etc.; -- called also air bath. A modified form is provided with a jacket in the outside partition for holding water, or other volatile liquid, by which the temperature may be limited exactly to the required degree. Vapor burner, a burner for burning a vaporized hydrocarbon. Vapor density (Chem.), the relative weight of gases and vapors as compared with some specific standard, usually hydrogen, but sometimes air. The vapor density of gases and vaporizable substances as compared with hydrogen, when multiplied by two, or when compared with air and multiplied by 28.8, gives the molecular weight. Vapor engine, an engine worked by the expansive force of a vapor, esp. a vapor other than steam., 14. (Paint.) (a) The representation or reproduction of the effect of the atmospheric medium through which every object in nature is viewed. --New Am. Cyc. (b) Carriage; attitude; action; movement; as, the head of that portrait has a good air. --Fairholt. 15. (Man.) The artificial motion or carriage of a horse. Note: Air is much used adjectively or as the first part of a compound term. In most cases it might be written indifferently, as a separate limiting word, or as the first element of the compound term, with or without the hyphen; as, air bladder, air-bladder, or airbladder; air cell, air-cell, or aircell; air-pump, or airpump. Air balloon. See Balloon. Air bath. (a) An apparatus for the application of air to the body. (b) An arrangement for drying substances in air of any desired temperature. Air castle. See Castle in the air, under Castle. Air compressor, a machine for compressing air to be used as a motive power. Air crossing, a passage for air in a mine. Air cushion, an air-tight cushion which can be inflated; also, a device for arresting motion without shock by confined air. Air fountain, a contrivance for producing a jet of water by the force of compressed air. Air furnace, a furnace which depends on a natural draft and not on blast. Air line, a straight line; a bee line. Hence Air-line, adj.; as, air-line road. Air lock (Hydr. Engin.), an intermediate chamber between the outer air and the compressed-air chamber of a pneumatic caisson. --Knight. Air port (Nav.), a scuttle or porthole in a ship to admit air. Air spring, a spring in which the elasticity of air is utilized. Air thermometer, a form of thermometer in which the contraction and expansion of air is made to measure changes of temperature. Air threads, gossamer. Air trap, a contrivance for shutting off foul air or gas from drains, sewers, etc.; a stench trap. Air trunk, a pipe or shaft for conducting foul or heated air from a room. Air valve, a valve to regulate the admission or egress of air; esp. a valve which opens inwardly in a steam boiler and allows air to enter. Air way, a passage for a current of air; as the air way of an air pump; an air way in a mine. In the air. (a) Prevalent without traceable origin or authority, as rumors. (b) Not in a fixed or stable position; unsettled. (c) (Mil.) Unsupported and liable to be turned or taken in flank; as, the army had its wing in the air. To take air, to be divulged; to be made public. To take the air, to go abroad; to walk or ride out., Air bed Air" bed` A sack or matters inflated with air, and used as a bed., Air bladder Air" blad`der 1. (Anat.) An air sac, sometimes double or variously lobed, in the visceral cavity of many fishes. It originates in the same way as the lungs of air-breathing vertebrates, and in the adult may retain a tubular connection with the pharynx or esophagus. 2. A sac or bladder full of air in an animal or plant; also an air hole in a casting., Air brake Air" brake` (Mach.) A railway brake operated by condensed air. --Knight., Air brush Air brush A kind of atomizer for applying liquid coloring matter in a spray by compressed air., 14. (Paint.) (a) The representation or reproduction of the effect of the atmospheric medium through which every object in nature is viewed. --New Am. Cyc. (b) Carriage; attitude; action; movement; as, the head of that portrait has a good air. --Fairholt. 15. (Man.) The artificial motion or carriage of a horse. Note: Air is much used adjectively or as the first part of a compound term. In most cases it might be written indifferently, as a separate limiting word, or as the first element of the compound term, with or without the hyphen; as, air bladder, air-bladder, or airbladder; air cell, air-cell, or aircell; air-pump, or airpump. Air balloon. See Balloon. Air bath. (a) An apparatus for the application of air to the body. (b) An arrangement for drying substances in air of any desired temperature. Air castle. See Castle in the air, under Castle. Air compressor, a machine for compressing air to be used as a motive power. Air crossing, a passage for air in a mine. Air cushion, an air-tight cushion which can be inflated; also, a device for arresting motion without shock by confined air. Air fountain, a contrivance for producing a jet of water by the force of compressed air. Air furnace, a furnace which depends on a natural draft and not on blast. Air line, a straight line; a bee line. Hence Air-line, adj.; as, air-line road. Air lock (Hydr. Engin.), an intermediate chamber between the outer air and the compressed-air chamber of a pneumatic caisson. --Knight. Air port (Nav.), a scuttle or porthole in a ship to admit air. Air spring, a spring in which the elasticity of air is utilized. Air thermometer, a form of thermometer in which the contraction and expansion of air is made to measure changes of temperature. Air threads, gossamer. Air trap, a contrivance for shutting off foul air or gas from drains, sewers, etc.; a stench trap. Air trunk, a pipe or shaft for conducting foul or heated air from a room. Air valve, a valve to regulate the admission or egress of air; esp. a valve which opens inwardly in a steam boiler and allows air to enter. Air way, a passage for a current of air; as the air way of an air pump; an air way in a mine. In the air. (a) Prevalent without traceable origin or authority, as rumors. (b) Not in a fixed or stable position; unsettled. (c) (Mil.) Unsupported and liable to be turned or taken in flank; as, the army had its wing in the air. To take air, to be divulged; to be made public. To take the air, to go abroad; to walk or ride out., Air cell Air" cell` 1. (Bot.) A cavity in the cellular tissue of plants, containing air only. 2. (Anat.) A receptacle of air in various parts of the system; as, a cell or minute cavity in the walls of the air tubes of the lungs; the air sac of birds; a dilatation of the air vessels in insects., Cell Cell, n. [OF. celle, fr. L. cella; akin to celare to hide, and E. hell, helm, conceal. Cf. Hall.] 1. A very small and close apartment, as in a prison or in a monastery or convent; the hut of a hermit. The heroic confessor in his cell. --Macaulay. 2. A small religious house attached to a monastery or convent. ``Cells or dependent priories.' --Milman. 3. Any small cavity, or hollow place. 4. (Arch.) (a) The space between the ribs of a vaulted roof. (b) Same as Cella. 5. (Elec.) A jar of vessel, or a division of a compound vessel, for holding the exciting fluid of a battery. 6. (Biol.) One of the minute elementary structures, of which the greater part of the various tissues and organs of animals and plants are composed. Note: All cells have their origin in the primary cell from which the organism was developed. In the lowest animal and vegetable forms, one single cell constitutes the complete individual, such being called unicelluter orgamisms. A typical cell is composed of a semifluid mass of protoplasm, more or less granular, generally containing in its center a nucleus which in turn frequently contains one or more nucleoli, the whole being surrounded by a thin membrane, the cell wall. In some cells, as in those of blood, in the am[oe]ba, and in embryonic cells (both vegetable and animal), there is no restricting cell wall, while in some of the unicelluliar organisms the nucleus is wholly wanting. See Illust. of Bipolar. Air cell. See Air cell. Cell development (called also cell genesis, cell formation, and cytogenesis), the multiplication, of cells by a process of reproduction under the following common forms; segmentation or fission, gemmation or budding, karyokinesis, and endogenous multiplication. See Segmentation, Gemmation, etc. Cell theory. (Biol.) See Cellular theory, under Cellular., Air chamber Air" cham`ber 1. A chamber or cavity filled with air, in an animal or plant. 2. A cavity containing air to act as a spring for equalizing the flow of a liquid in a pump or other hydraulic machine., Air cock Air" cock` A faucet to allow escape of air., 14. (Paint.) (a) The representation or reproduction of the effect of the atmospheric medium through which every object in nature is viewed. --New Am. Cyc. (b) Carriage; attitude; action; movement; as, the head of that portrait has a good air. --Fairholt. 15. (Man.) The artificial motion or carriage of a horse. Note: Air is much used adjectively or as the first part of a compound term. In most cases it might be written indifferently, as a separate limiting word, or as the first element of the compound term, with or without the hyphen; as, air bladder, air-bladder, or airbladder; air cell, air-cell, or aircell; air-pump, or airpump. Air balloon. See Balloon. Air bath. (a) An apparatus for the application of air to the body. (b) An arrangement for drying substances in air of any desired temperature. Air castle. See Castle in the air, under Castle. Air compressor, a machine for compressing air to be used as a motive power. Air crossing, a passage for air in a mine. Air cushion, an air-tight cushion which can be inflated; also, a device for arresting motion without shock by confined air. Air fountain, a contrivance for producing a jet of water by the force of compressed air. Air furnace, a furnace which depends on a natural draft and not on blast. Air line, a straight line; a bee line. Hence Air-line, adj.; as, air-line road. Air lock (Hydr. Engin.), an intermediate chamber between the outer air and the compressed-air chamber of a pneumatic caisson. --Knight. Air port (Nav.), a scuttle or porthole in a ship to admit air. Air spring, a spring in which the elasticity of air is utilized. Air thermometer, a form of thermometer in which the contraction and expansion of air is made to measure changes of temperature. Air threads, gossamer. Air trap, a contrivance for shutting off foul air or gas from drains, sewers, etc.; a stench trap. Air trunk, a pipe or shaft for conducting foul or heated air from a room. Air valve, a valve to regulate the admission or egress of air; esp. a valve which opens inwardly in a steam boiler and allows air to enter. Air way, a passage for a current of air; as the air way of an air pump; an air way in a mine. In the air. (a) Prevalent without traceable origin or authority, as rumors. (b) Not in a fixed or stable position; unsettled. (c) (Mil.) Unsupported and liable to be turned or taken in flank; as, the army had its wing in the air. To take air, to be divulged; to be made public. To take the air, to go abroad; to walk or ride out., Internal-combustion engine Internal-combustion engine) in which the heat or pressure energy necessary to produce motion is developed in the engine cylinder, as by the explosion of a gas, and not in a separate chamber, as in a steam-engine boiler. The gas used may be a fixed gas, or one derived from alcohol, ether, gasoline (petrol), naphtha, oil (petroleum), etc. There are three main classes: (1) gas engines proper, using fixed gases, as coal, blast-furnace, or producer gas; (2) engines using the vapor of a volatile fluid, as the typical gasoline (petrol) engine; (3) oil engines, using either an atomized spray or the vapor (produced by heat) of a comparatively heavy oil, as petroleum or kerosene. In all of these the gas is mixed with a definite amount of air, the charge is composed in the cylinder and is then exploded either by a flame of gas ( flame ignition -- now little used), by a hot tube ( tube ignition) or the like, by an electric spark ( electric ignition, the usual method is gasoline engines, or by the heat of compression, as in the Diesel engine. Gas and oil engines are chiefly of the stationary type. Gasoline engines are largely used for automobile vehicles, boats, etc. Most internal-combustion engines use the Otto (four-stroke) cycle, though many use the two-stroke cycle. They are almost universally trunk engines and single-acting. Because of the intense heat produced by the frequent explosions, the cylinders must be cooled by a water jacket ( water-cooled) or by air currents ( air cooled) to give the maximum thermodynamic efficiency and to avoid excessive friction or seizing. Interne In*terne", n. [F.] (F. pron. [a^]N`t[^a]rn") (Med.) A resident physician in a hospital; a house physician., Air cooling Air cooling In gasoline-engine motor vehicles, the cooling of the cylinder by increasing its radiating surface by means of ribs or radiators, and placing it so that it is exposed to a current of air. Cf. Water cooling. -- Air"-cooled`, a., 14. (Paint.) (a) The representation or reproduction of the effect of the atmospheric medium through which every object in nature is viewed. --New Am. Cyc. (b) Carriage; attitude; action; movement; as, the head of that portrait has a good air. --Fairholt. 15. (Man.) The artificial motion or carriage of a horse. Note: Air is much used adjectively or as the first part of a compound term. In most cases it might be written indifferently, as a separate limiting word, or as the first element of the compound term, with or without the hyphen; as, air bladder, air-bladder, or airbladder; air cell, air-cell, or aircell; air-pump, or airpump. Air balloon. See Balloon. Air bath. (a) An apparatus for the application of air to the body. (b) An arrangement for drying substances in air of any desired temperature. Air castle. See Castle in the air, under Castle. Air compressor, a machine for compressing air to be used as a motive power. Air crossing, a passage for air in a mine. Air cushion, an air-tight cushion which can be inflated; also, a device for arresting motion without shock by confined air. Air fountain, a contrivance for producing a jet of water by the force of compressed air. Air furnace, a furnace which depends on a natural draft and not on blast. Air line, a straight line; a bee line. Hence Air-line, adj.; as, air-line road. Air lock (Hydr. Engin.), an intermediate chamber between the outer air and the compressed-air chamber of a pneumatic caisson. --Knight. Air port (Nav.), a scuttle or porthole in a ship to admit air. Air spring, a spring in which the elasticity of air is utilized. Air thermometer, a form of thermometer in which the contraction and expansion of air is made to measure changes of temperature. Air threads, gossamer. Air trap, a contrivance for shutting off foul air or gas from drains, sewers, etc.; a stench trap. Air trunk, a pipe or shaft for conducting foul or heated air from a room. Air valve, a valve to regulate the admission or egress of air; esp. a valve which opens inwardly in a steam boiler and allows air to enter. Air way, a passage for a current of air; as the air way of an air pump; an air way in a mine. In the air. (a) Prevalent without traceable origin or authority, as rumors. (b) Not in a fixed or stable position; unsettled. (c) (Mil.) Unsupported and liable to be turned or taken in flank; as, the army had its wing in the air. To take air, to be divulged; to be made public. To take the air, to go abroad; to walk or ride out., 14. (Paint.) (a) The representation or reproduction of the effect of the atmospheric medium through which every object in nature is viewed. --New Am. Cyc. (b) Carriage; attitude; action; movement; as, the head of that portrait has a good air. --Fairholt. 15. (Man.) The artificial motion or carriage of a horse. Note: Air is much used adjectively or as the first part of a compound term. In most cases it might be written indifferently, as a separate limiting word, or as the first element of the compound term, with or without the hyphen; as, air bladder, air-bladder, or airbladder; air cell, air-cell, or aircell; air-pump, or airpump. Air balloon. See Balloon. Air bath. (a) An apparatus for the application of air to the body. (b) An arrangement for drying substances in air of any desired temperature. Air castle. See Castle in the air, under Castle. Air compressor, a machine for compressing air to be used as a motive power. Air crossing, a passage for air in a mine. Air cushion, an air-tight cushion which can be inflated; also, a device for arresting motion without shock by confined air. Air fountain, a contrivance for producing a jet of water by the force of compressed air. Air furnace, a furnace which depends on a natural draft and not on blast. Air line, a straight line; a bee line. Hence Air-line, adj.; as, air-line road. Air lock (Hydr. Engin.), an intermediate chamber between the outer air and the compressed-air chamber of a pneumatic caisson. --Knight. Air port (Nav.), a scuttle or porthole in a ship to admit air. Air spring, a spring in which the elasticity of air is utilized. Air thermometer, a form of thermometer in which the contraction and expansion of air is made to measure changes of temperature. Air threads, gossamer. Air trap, a contrivance for shutting off foul air or gas from drains, sewers, etc.; a stench trap. Air trunk, a pipe or shaft for conducting foul or heated air from a room. Air valve, a valve to regulate the admission or egress of air; esp. a valve which opens inwardly in a steam boiler and allows air to enter. Air way, a passage for a current of air; as the air way of an air pump; an air way in a mine. In the air. (a) Prevalent without traceable origin or authority, as rumors. (b) Not in a fixed or stable position; unsettled. (c) (Mil.) Unsupported and liable to be turned or taken in flank; as, the army had its wing in the air. To take air, to be divulged; to be made public. To take the air, to go abroad; to walk or ride out., Air drill Air" drill` A drill driven by the elastic pressure of condensed air; a pneumatic drill. --Knight., Air engine Air" engine` An engine driven by heated or by compressed air. --Knight., 14. (Paint.) (a) The representation or reproduction of the effect of the atmospheric medium through which every object in nature is viewed. --New Am. Cyc. (b) Carriage; attitude; action; movement; as, the head of that portrait has a good air. --Fairholt. 15. (Man.) The artificial motion or carriage of a horse. Note: Air is much used adjectively or as the first part of a compound term. In most cases it might be written indifferently, as a separate limiting word, or as the first element of the compound term, with or without the hyphen; as, air bladder, air-bladder, or airbladder; air cell, air-cell, or aircell; air-pump, or airpump. Air balloon. See Balloon. Air bath. (a) An apparatus for the application of air to the body. (b) An arrangement for drying substances in air of any desired temperature. Air castle. See Castle in the air, under Castle. Air compressor, a machine for compressing air to be used as a motive power. Air crossing, a passage for air in a mine. Air cushion, an air-tight cushion which can be inflated; also, a device for arresting motion without shock by confined air. Air fountain, a contrivance for producing a jet of water by the force of compressed air. Air furnace, a furnace which depends on a natural draft and not on blast. Air line, a straight line; a bee line. Hence Air-line, adj.; as, air-line road. Air lock (Hydr. Engin.), an intermediate chamber between the outer air and the compressed-air chamber of a pneumatic caisson. --Knight. Air port (Nav.), a scuttle or porthole in a ship to admit air. Air spring, a spring in which the elasticity of air is utilized. Air thermometer, a form of thermometer in which the contraction and expansion of air is made to measure changes of temperature. Air threads, gossamer. Air trap, a contrivance for shutting off foul air or gas from drains, sewers, etc.; a stench trap. Air trunk, a pipe or shaft for conducting foul or heated air from a room. Air valve, a valve to regulate the admission or egress of air; esp. a valve which opens inwardly in a steam boiler and allows air to enter. Air way, a passage for a current of air; as the air way of an air pump; an air way in a mine. In the air. (a) Prevalent without traceable origin or authority, as rumors. (b) Not in a fixed or stable position; unsettled. (c) (Mil.) Unsupported and liable to be turned or taken in flank; as, the army had its wing in the air. To take air, to be divulged; to be made public. To take the air, to go abroad; to walk or ride out., Fountain Foun"tain (foun"t[i^]n), n. [F. fontaine, LL. fontana, fr. L. fons, fontis. See 2d Fount.] 1. A spring of water issuing from the earth. 2. An artificially produced jet or stream of water; also, the structure or works in which such a jet or stream rises or flows; a basin built and constantly supplied with pure water for drinking and other useful purposes, or for ornament. 3. A reservoir or chamber to contain a liquid which can be conducted or drawn off as needed for use; as, the ink fountain in a printing press, etc. 4. The source from which anything proceeds, or from which anything is supplied continuously; origin; source. Judea, the fountain of the gospel. --Fuller. Author of all being, Fountain of light, thyself invisible. --Milton. Air fountain. See under Air. Fountain heead, primary source; original; first principle. --Young. Fountain inkstand, an inkstand having a continual supply of ink, as from elevated reservoir. Fountain lamp, a lamp fed with oil from an elevated reservoir. Fountain pen, a pen with a reservoir in the handle which furnishes a supply of ink. Fountain pump. (a) A structure for a fountain, having the form of a pump. (b) A portable garden pump which throws a jet, for watering plants, etc. Fountain shell (Zo["o]l.), the large West Indian conch shell (Strombus gigas). Fountain of youth, a mythical fountain whose waters were fabled to have the property of renewing youth., 14. (Paint.) (a) The representation or reproduction of the effect of the atmospheric medium through which every object in nature is viewed. --New Am. Cyc. (b) Carriage; attitude; action; movement; as, the head of that portrait has a good air. --Fairholt. 15. (Man.) The artificial motion or carriage of a horse. Note: Air is much used adjectively or as the first part of a compound term. In most cases it might be written indifferently, as a separate limiting word, or as the first element of the compound term, with or without the hyphen; as, air bladder, air-bladder, or airbladder; air cell, air-cell, or aircell; air-pump, or airpump. Air balloon. See Balloon. Air bath. (a) An apparatus for the application of air to the body. (b) An arrangement for drying substances in air of any desired temperature. Air castle. See Castle in the air, under Castle. Air compressor, a machine for compressing air to be used as a motive power. Air crossing, a passage for air in a mine. Air cushion, an air-tight cushion which can be inflated; also, a device for arresting motion without shock by confined air. Air fountain, a contrivance for producing a jet of water by the force of compressed air. Air furnace, a furnace which depends on a natural draft and not on blast. Air line, a straight line; a bee line. Hence Air-line, adj.; as, air-line road. Air lock (Hydr. Engin.), an intermediate chamber between the outer air and the compressed-air chamber of a pneumatic caisson. --Knight. Air port (Nav.), a scuttle or porthole in a ship to admit air. Air spring, a spring in which the elasticity of air is utilized. Air thermometer, a form of thermometer in which the contraction and expansion of air is made to measure changes of temperature. Air threads, gossamer. Air trap, a contrivance for shutting off foul air or gas from drains, sewers, etc.; a stench trap. Air trunk, a pipe or shaft for conducting foul or heated air from a room. Air valve, a valve to regulate the admission or egress of air; esp. a valve which opens inwardly in a steam boiler and allows air to enter. Air way, a passage for a current of air; as the air way of an air pump; an air way in a mine. In the air. (a) Prevalent without traceable origin or authority, as rumors. (b) Not in a fixed or stable position; unsettled. (c) (Mil.) Unsupported and liable to be turned or taken in flank; as, the army had its wing in the air. To take air, to be divulged; to be made public. To take the air, to go abroad; to walk or ride out., Air gap Air gap (Physics) An air-filled gap in a magnetic or electric circuit; specif., in a dynamo or motor, the space between the field-magnet poles and the armature; clearance., Air gas Air" gas` See under Gas., Note: Gas is often used adjectively or in combination; as, gas fitter or gasfitter; gas meter or gas-meter, etc. Air gas (Chem.), a kind of gas made by forcing air through some volatile hydrocarbon, as the lighter petroleums. The air is so saturated with combustible vapor as to be a convenient illuminating and heating agent. Gas battery (Elec.), a form of voltaic battery, in which gases, especially hydrogen and oxygen, are the active agents. Gas carbon, Gas coke, etc. See under Carbon, Coke, etc. Gas coal, a bituminous or hydrogenous coal yielding a high percentage of volatile matters, and therefore available for the manufacture of illuminating gas. --R. W. Raymond. Gas engine, an engine in which the motion of the piston is produced by the combustion or sudden production or expansion of gas; -- especially, an engine in which an explosive mixture of gas and air is forced into the working cylinder and ignited there by a gas flame or an electric spark., Air gun Air" gun` (g[u^]n`). A kind of gun in which the elastic force of condensed air is used to discharge the ball. The air is powerfully compressed into a reservoir attached to the gun, by a condensing pump, and is controlled by a valve actuated by the trigger., Air hole Air hole (A["e]ronautics) A local region in the atmosphere having a downward movement and offering less than normal support for the sustaining surfaces of a flying machine., Air hole Air" hole` (h[=o]l`). 1. A hole to admit or discharge air; specifically, a spot in the ice not frozen over. 2. (Founding) A fault in a casting, produced by a bubble of air; a blowhole.


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- while air content and atmospheric pressure vary at different layers, air suitable for the survival of terrestrial plant s and terrestrial
- the aïr mountains (also known as the aïr massif or air of niger; the name is ayăr in tuareg and azbin /abzin in eastern / western hausa
- adobe integrated runtime, also known as adobe air, is a cross-platform run-time system developed by adobe systems for building rich
- air is the name given to the earth's atmosphere . air may also refer to. music : air (music), a song-like vocal or instrumental composition
- the united states air force (usaf) is the aerial warfare service branch of the united states armed forces and one of the seven american
- the royal air force (raf) is the aerial warfare service branch of the british armed forces . the oldest independent air force in the world
- an air brake is a conveyance braking system actuated by compressed air . modern trains rely upon a fail-safe air brake system that is
- air pollution is the introduction into the atmosphere of chemical s, particulates , or biological material s that cause discomfort,
- the air national guard (ang), also known as the air guard, is the air force militia component of each u.s. state, the district of columbia
- air is a japanese adult visual novel developed by key released on september 8, 2000 for windows pcs . released versions of air without


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