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Definition for word entry.

Ancientry An"cient*ry, n. 1. Antiquity; what is ancient. They contain not word of ancientry. -West. 2. Old age; also, old people. [R.] Wronging the ancientry. -Shak. 3. Ancient lineage; ancestry; dignity of birth. A gentleman of more ancientry than estate. -Fuller.

Angle of entry An"gle of en"try (A["e]ronautics) The angle between the tangent to the advancing edge (of an a["e]rocurve) and the line of motion; - contrasted with angle of trail, which is the angle between the tangent to the following edge and the line of motion.

Argentry Ar"gent*ry, n. [F. argenterie, fr. argent silver, L. argentum.] Silver plate or vessels. [Obs.] Bowls of frosted argentry. -Howell.

Bookkeeping Book"keep`ing, n. The art of recording pecuniary or business transactions in a regular and systematic manner, so as to show their relation to each other, and the state of the business in which they occur; the art of keeping accounts. The books commonly used are a daybook, cashbook, journal, and ledger. See Daybook, Cashbook, Journal, and Ledger. Bookkeeping by single entry, the method of keeping books by carrying the record of each transaction to the debit or credit of a single account. Bookkeeping by double entry, a mode of bookkeeping in which two entries of every transaction are carried to the ledger, one to the Dr., or left hand, side of one account, and the other to the Cr., or right hand, side of a corresponding account, in order tha? the one entry may check the other; - sometimes called, from the place of its origin, the Italian method.

Bookkeeping Book"keep`ing, n. The art of recording pecuniary or business transactions in a regular and systematic manner, so as to show their relation to each other, and the state of the business in which they occur; the art of keeping accounts. The books commonly used are a daybook, cashbook, journal, and ledger. See Daybook, Cashbook, Journal, and Ledger. Bookkeeping by single entry, the method of keeping books by carrying the record of each transaction to the debit or credit of a single account. Bookkeeping by double entry, a mode of bookkeeping in which two entries of every transaction are carried to the ledger, one to the Dr., or left hand, side of one account, and the other to the Cr., or right hand, side of a corresponding account, in order tha? the one entry may check the other; - sometimes called, from the place of its origin, the Italian method.

Carpentry Car"pen*try, n. [F. charpenterie, OF. also carpenterie. See Carpenter.] 1. The art of cutting, framing, and joining timber, as in the construction of buildings. 2. An assemblage of pieces of timber connected by being framed together, as the pieces of a roof, floor, etc.; work done by a carpenter.

Centry Cen"try, n. See Sentry. [Obs.] -Gray.

Coventry Cov"en*try (k?v"en tr?), n. A town in the county of Warwick, England. To send to Coventry, to exclude from society; to shut out from social intercourse, as for ungentlemanly conduct. Coventry blue, blue thread of a superior dye, made at Coventry, England, and used for embroidery.

Coventry Cov"en*try (k?v"en tr?), n. A town in the county of Warwick, England. To send to Coventry, to exclude from society; to shut out from social intercourse, as for ungentlemanly conduct. Coventry blue, blue thread of a superior dye, made at Coventry, England, and used for embroidery.

Entryng En"tryng, n. Am entrance. [Obs.] So great an entryng and so large. -Chaucer.

Forcible For"ci*ble, a. [Cf. OF. forcible forcible, forceable that may be forced.] 1. Possessing force; characterized by force, efficiency, or energy; powerful; efficacious; impressive; influential. How forcible are right words! -Job. vi. 2?. Sweet smells are most forcible in dry substances, when broken. -Bacon. But I have reasons strong and forcible. -Shak. That punishment which hath been sometimes forcible to bridle sin. -Hooker. He is at once elegant and sublime, forcible and ornamented. -Lowth (Transl. ) 2. Violent; impetuous. Like mingled streams, more forcible when joined. -Prior. 3. Using force against opposition or resistance; obtained by compulsion; effected by force; as, forcible entry or abduction. In embraces of King James . . . forcible and unjust. -Swift. Forcible entry and detainer (Law), the entering upon and taking and withholding of land and tenements by actual force and violence, and with a strong hand, to the hindrance of the person having the right to enter. Syn: Violent; powerful; strong; energetic; mighty; potent; weighty; impressive; cogent; influential.

Misentry Mis*en"try, n. An erroneous entry or charge, as of an account.

Outsentry Out"sen`try, n. (Mil.) A sentry who guards the entrance or approach to a place; an outguard.

Peering in maps for ports and piers and roads. -Shak. We are in port if we have Thee. -Keble. 2. In law and commercial usage, a harbor where vessels are admitted to discharge and receive cargoes, from whence they depart and where they finish their voyages. Free port. See under Free. Port bar. (Naut,) (a) A boom. See Boom, 4, also Bar, 3. (b) A bar, as of sand, at the mouth of, or in, a port. Port charges (Com.), charges, as wharfage, etc., to which a ship or its cargo is subjected in a harbor. Port of entry, a harbor where a customhouse is established for the legal entry of merchandise. Port toll (Law), a payment made for the privilege of bringing goods into port. Port warden, the officer in charge of a port; a harbor master.

Postentry Post"en*try, n. [Pref. post + entry.] 1. A second or subsequent, at the customhouse, of goods which had been omitted by mistake. 2. (Bookkeeping) An additional or subsequent entry.

Reentry Re*["e]n"try ( tr?), n. 1. A second or new entry; as, a re["e]ntry into public life. 2. (Law) A resuming or retaking possession of what one has lately foregone; - applied especially to land; the entry by a lessor upon the premises leased, on failure of the tenant to pay rent or perform the covenants in the lease. -Burrill. Card of re["e]try, (Whist), a card that by winning a trick will bring one the lead at an advanced period of the hand.

Kite Kite, n. (Naut.) A form of drag to be towed under water at any depth up to about forty fathoms, which on striking bottom is upset and rises to the surface; - called also sentry.

Single Sin"gle, a. [L. singulus, a dim. from the root in simplex simple; cf. OE. & OF. sengle, fr. L. singulus. See Simple, and cf. Singular.] 1. One only, as distinguished from more than one; consisting of one alone; individual; separate; as, a single star. No single man is born with a right of controlling the opinions of all the rest. -Pope. 2. Alone; having no companion. Who single hast maintained, Against revolted multitudes, the cause Of truth. -Milton. 3. Hence, unmarried; as, a single man or woman. Grows, lives, and dies in single blessedness. -Shak. Single chose to live, and shunned to wed. -Dryden. 4. Not doubled, twisted together, or combined with others; as, a single thread; a single strand of a rope. 5. Performed by one person, or one on each side; as, a single combat. These shifts refuted, answer thy appellant, . . . Who now defles thee thrice ti single fight. -Milton. 6. Uncompounded; pure; unmixed. Simple ideas are opposed to complex, and single to compound. -I. Watts. 7. Not deceitful or artful; honest; sincere. I speak it with a single heart. -Shak. 8. Simple; not wise; weak; silly. [Obs.] He utters such single matter in so infantly a voice. -Beau. & Fl. Single ale, beer, or drink, small ale, etc., as contrasted with double ale, etc., which is stronger. [Obs.] -Nares. Single bill (Law), a written engagement, generally under seal, for the payment of money, without a penalty. -Burril. Single court (Lawn Tennis), a court laid out for only two players. Single cut file. See the Note under 4th File. Single entry. See under Bookkeeping. Single file. See under 1st File. Single flower (Bot.), a flower with but one set of petals, as a wild rose. Single knot. See Illust. under Knot. Single whip (Naut.), a single rope running through a fixed block.

Studentry Stu"dent*ry, n. A body of students. [R.]

Coventry Cov"en*try (k?v"en tr?), n. A town in the county of Warwick, England. To send to Coventry, to exclude from society; to shut out from social intercourse, as for ungentlemanly conduct. Coventry blue, blue thread of a superior dye, made at Coventry, England, and used for embroidery.

Tormentry Tor"ment*ry, n. Anything producing torment, annoyance, or pain. [Obs.] -Chaucer.

Explination we found from Wikipedia for entry.

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- to get the hand and swing right on exterior doors, as the transom is usually sloped and sealed to resist water entry, and to properly drain.
- date august 2010 the following is a listing of fictional character s from the hbo series the sopranos that are associated with the soprano

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