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Definition for word evolution.

Anomalistic A*nom`a*lis"tic, Anomalistical A*nom`a*lis"tic*al, a. [Cf. F. anomalistique.] 1. Irregular; departing from common or established rules. 2. (Astron.) Pertaining to the anomaly, or angular distance of a planet from its perihelion. Anomalistic month. See under Month. Anomalistic revolution, the period in which a planet or satellite goes through the complete cycles of its changes of anomaly, or from any point in its elliptic orbit to the same again. Anomalistic, or Periodical year. See under Year., Axis Ax"is, n.; pl. Axes. [L. axis axis, axle. See Axle.] A straight line, real or imaginary, passing through a body, on which it revolves, or may be supposed to revolve; a line passing through a body or system around which the parts are symmetrically arranged. 2. (Math.) A straight line with respect to which the different parts of a magnitude are symmetrically arranged; as, the axis of a cylinder, i. e., the axis of a cone, that is, the straight line joining the vertex and the center of the base; the axis of a circle, any straight line passing through the center. 3. (Bot.) The stem; the central part, or longitudinal support, on which organs or parts are arranged; the central line of any body. --Gray. 4. (Anat.) (a) The second vertebra of the neck, or vertebra dentata. (b) Also used of the body only of the vertebra, which is prolonged anteriorly within the foramen of the first vertebra or atlas, so as to form the odontoid process or peg which serves as a pivot for the atlas and head to turn upon. 5. (Crystallog.) One of several imaginary lines, assumed in describing the position of the planes by which a crystal is bounded. 6. (Fine Arts) The primary or secondary central line of any design. Anticlinal axis (Geol.), a line or ridge from which the strata slope downward on the two opposite sides. Synclinal axis, a line from which the strata slope upward in opposite directions, so as to form a valley. Axis cylinder (Anat.), the neuraxis or essential, central substance of a nerve fiber; -- called also axis band, axial fiber, and cylinder axis. Axis in peritrochio, the wheel and axle, one of the mechanical powers. Axis of a curve (Geom.), a straight line which bisects a system of parallel chords of a curve; called a principal axis, when cutting them at right angles, in which case it divides the curve into two symmetrical portions, as in the parabola, which has one such axis, the ellipse, which has two, or the circle, which has an infinite number. The two axes of the ellipse are the major axis and the minor axis, and the two axes of the hyperbola are the transverse axis and the conjugate axis. Axis of a lens, the straight line passing through its center and perpendicular to its surfaces. Axis of a telescope or microscope, the straight line with which coincide the axes of the several lenses which compose it. Axes of co["o]rdinates in a plane, two straight lines intersecting each other, to which points are referred for the purpose of determining their relative position: they are either rectangular or oblique. Axes of co["o]rdinates in space, the three straight lines in which the co["o]rdinate planes intersect each other. Axis of a balance, that line about which it turns. Axis of oscillation, of a pendulum, a right line passing through the center about which it vibrates, and perpendicular to the plane of vibration. Axis of polarization, the central line around which the prismatic rings or curves are arranged. --Brewster. Axis of revolution (Descriptive Geom.), a straight line about which some line or plane is revolved, so that the several points of the line or plane shall describe circles with their centers in the fixed line, and their planes perpendicular to it, the line describing a surface of revolution, and the plane a solid of revolution. Axis of symmetry (Geom.), any line in a plane figure which divides the figure into two such parts that one part, when folded over along the axis, shall coincide with the other part. Axis of the equator, ecliptic, horizon (or other circle considered with reference to the sphere on which it lies), the diameter of the sphere which is perpendicular to the plane of the circle. --Hutton. Axis of the Ionic capital (Arch.), a line passing perpendicularly through the middle of the eye of the volute. Neutral axis (Mech.), the line of demarcation between the horizontal elastic forces of tension and compression, exerted by the fibers in any cross section of a girder. Optic axis of a crystal, the direction in which a ray of transmitted light suffers no double refraction. All crystals, not of the isometric system, are either uniaxial or biaxial. Optic axis, Visual axis (Opt.), the straight line passing through the center of the pupil, and perpendicular to the surface of the eye. Radical axis of two circles (Geom.), the straight line perpendicular to the line joining their centers and such that the tangents from any point of it to the two circles shall be equal to each other. Spiral axis (Arch.), the axis of a twisted column drawn spirally in order to trace the circumvolutions without. Axis of abscissas and Axis of ordinates. See Abscissa., Counter Coun"ter, a. Contrary; opposite; contrasted; opposed; adverse; antagonistic; as, a counter current; a counter revolution; a counter poison; a counter agent; counter fugue. ``Innumerable facts attesting the counter principle.' --I. Taylor. Counter approach (Fort.), a trench or work pushed forward from defensive works to meet the approaches of besiegers. See Approach. Counter bond (Law), in old practice, a bond to secure one who has given bond for another. Counter brace. See Counter brace, in Vocabulary. Counter deed (Law), a secret writing which destroys, invalidates, or alters, a public deed. Counter distinction, contradistinction. [Obs.] Counter drain, a drain at the foot of the embankment of a canal or watercourse, for carrying off the water that may soak through. Counter extension (Surg.), the fixation of the upper part of a limb, while extension is practiced on the lower part, as in cases of luxation or fracture. Counter fissure (Surg.) Same as Contrafissure. Counter indication. (Med.) Same as Contraindication. Counter irritant (Med.), an irritant to produce a blister, a pustular eruption, or other irritation in some part of the body, in order to relieve an existing irritation in some other part. ``Counter irritants are of as great use in moral as in physical diseases.' --Macaulay. Counter irritation (Med.), the act or the result of applying a counter irritant. Counter opening, an aperture or vent on the opposite side, or in a different place. Counter parole (Mil.), a word in addition to the password, given in time of alarm as a signal. Counter plea (Law), a replication to a plea. --Cowell. Counter pressure, force or pressure that acts in a contrary direction to some other opposing pressure. Counter project, a project, scheme, or proposal brought forward in opposition to another, as in the negotiation of a treaty. --Swift. Counter proof, in engraving, a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the engraver to inspect the state of the plate. Counter revolution, a revolution opposed to a former one, and restoring a former state of things. Counter revolutionist, one engaged in, or befriending, a counter revolution. Counter round (Mil.), a body of officers whose duty it is to visit and inspect the rounds and sentinels. Counter sea (Naut.), a sea running in an opposite direction from the wind. Counter sense, opposite meaning. Counter signal, a signal to answer or correspond to another. Counter signature, the name of a secretary or other officer countersigned to a writing. --Tooke. Counter slope, an overhanging slope; as, a wall with a counter slope. --Mahan. Counter statement, a statement made in opposition to, or denial of, another statement. Counter surety, a counter bond, or a surety to secure one who has given security. Counter tally, a tally corresponding to another. Counter tide, contrary tide., Counter Coun"ter, a. Contrary; opposite; contrasted; opposed; adverse; antagonistic; as, a counter current; a counter revolution; a counter poison; a counter agent; counter fugue. ``Innumerable facts attesting the counter principle.' --I. Taylor. Counter approach (Fort.), a trench or work pushed forward from defensive works to meet the approaches of besiegers. See Approach. Counter bond (Law), in old practice, a bond to secure one who has given bond for another. Counter brace. See Counter brace, in Vocabulary. Counter deed (Law), a secret writing which destroys, invalidates, or alters, a public deed. Counter distinction, contradistinction. [Obs.] Counter drain, a drain at the foot of the embankment of a canal or watercourse, for carrying off the water that may soak through. Counter extension (Surg.), the fixation of the upper part of a limb, while extension is practiced on the lower part, as in cases of luxation or fracture. Counter fissure (Surg.) Same as Contrafissure. Counter indication. (Med.) Same as Contraindication. Counter irritant (Med.), an irritant to produce a blister, a pustular eruption, or other irritation in some part of the body, in order to relieve an existing irritation in some other part. ``Counter irritants are of as great use in moral as in physical diseases.' --Macaulay. Counter irritation (Med.), the act or the result of applying a counter irritant. Counter opening, an aperture or vent on the opposite side, or in a different place. Counter parole (Mil.), a word in addition to the password, given in time of alarm as a signal. Counter plea (Law), a replication to a plea. --Cowell. Counter pressure, force or pressure that acts in a contrary direction to some other opposing pressure. Counter project, a project, scheme, or proposal brought forward in opposition to another, as in the negotiation of a treaty. --Swift. Counter proof, in engraving, a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the engraver to inspect the state of the plate. Counter revolution, a revolution opposed to a former one, and restoring a former state of things. Counter revolutionist, one engaged in, or befriending, a counter revolution. Counter round (Mil.), a body of officers whose duty it is to visit and inspect the rounds and sentinels. Counter sea (Naut.), a sea running in an opposite direction from the wind. Counter sense, opposite meaning. Counter signal, a signal to answer or correspond to another. Counter signature, the name of a secretary or other officer countersigned to a writing. --Tooke. Counter slope, an overhanging slope; as, a wall with a counter slope. --Mahan. Counter statement, a statement made in opposition to, or denial of, another statement. Counter surety, a counter bond, or a surety to secure one who has given security. Counter tally, a tally corresponding to another. Counter tide, contrary tide., Ellipsoid El*lip"soid, n. [Ellipse + -oid: cf. F. ellipsoide.] (Geom.) A solid, all plane sections of which are ellipses or circles. See Conoid, n., 2 (a) . Note: The ellipsoid has three principal plane sections, a, b, and c, each at right angles to the other two, and each dividing the solid into two equal and symmetrical parts. The lines of meeting of these principal sections are the axes, or principal diameters of the ellipsoid. The point where the three planes meet is the center. Ellipsoid of revolution, a spheroid; a solid figure generated by the revolution of an ellipse about one of its axes. It is called a prolate spheroid, or prolatum, when the ellipse is revolved about the major axis, and an oblate spheroid, or oblatum, when it is revolved about the minor axis., Evolutional Ev`o*lu"tion*al, a. Relating to evolution. ``Evolutional changes.' --H. Spenser., Evolutionary Ev`o*lu"tion*a*ry, a. Relating to evolution; as, evolutionary discussions., Evolutionism Ev`o*lu"tion*ism, n. The theory of, or belief in, evolution. See Evolution, 6 and 7., Evolutionist Ev`o*lu"tion*ist, n. 1. One skilled in evolutions. 2. one who holds the doctrine of evolution, either in biology or in metaphysics. --Darwin., Hyperboloid Hy*per"bo*loid, n. [Hyperbola + -oid: cf. F. hyperbolo["i]de.] (Geom.) A surface of the second order, which is cut by certain planes in hyperbolas; also, the solid, bounded in part by such a surface. Hyperboloid of revolution, an hyperboloid described by an hyperbola revolving about one of its axes. The surface has two separate sheets when the axis of revolution is the transverse axis, but only one when the axis of revolution is the conjugate axis of the hyperbola., Vertex Ver"tex, n.; pl. Vertexes, L. Vertices. [L. vertex, -icis, a whirl, top of the head, top, summit, from vertere to turn. See Verse, and cf. Vortex.] A turning point; the principal or highest point; top; summit; crown; apex. Specifically: (a) (Anat.) The top, or crown, of the head. (b) (Anat.) The zenith, or the point of the heavens directly overhead. (c) (Math.) The point in any figure opposite to, and farthest from, the base; the terminating point of some particular line or lines in a figure or a curve; the top, or the point opposite the base. Note: The principal vertex of a conic section is, in the parabola, the vertex of the axis of the curve: in the ellipse, either extremity of either axis, but usually the left-hand vertex of the transverse axis; in the hyperbola, either vertex, but usually the right-hand vertex of the transverse axis. Vertex of a curve (Math.), the point in which the axis of the curve intersects it. Vertex of an angle (Math.), the point in which the sides of the angle meet. Vertex of a solid, or of a surface of revolution (Math.), the point in which the axis pierces the surface., Revolutionary Rev`o*lu"tion*a*ry, n. A revolutionist. [R.] Dumfries was a Tory town, and could not tolerate a revolutionary. --Prof. Wilson., Revolutioner Rev`o*lu"tion*er, n. One who is engaged in effecting a revolution; a revolutionist. --Smollett., Revolutionize Rev`o*lu"tion*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Revolutioniezed; p. pr. & vb. n. Revolutionizing.] To change completely, as by a revolution; as, to revolutionize a government. --Ames. The gospel . . . has revolutionized his soul. --J. M. Mason., Revolutionism Rev`o*lu"tion*ism, n. The state of being in revolution; revolutionary doctrines or principles., Revolutionist Rev`o*lu"tion*ist, n. One engaged in effecting a change of government; a favorer of revolution. --Burke., Revolutionize Rev`o*lu"tion*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Revolutioniezed; p. pr. & vb. n. Revolutionizing.] To change completely, as by a revolution; as, to revolutionize a government. --Ames. The gospel . . . has revolutionized his soul. --J. M. Mason., Revolutionize Rev`o*lu"tion*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Revolutioniezed; p. pr. & vb. n. Revolutionizing.] To change completely, as by a revolution; as, to revolutionize a government. --Ames. The gospel . . . has revolutionized his soul. --J. M. Mason., Saltatory Sal"ta*to"ry, a. [L. saltatorius. See Saltant, and cf. Saltire.] Leaping or dancing; having the power of, or used in, leaping or dancing. Saltatory evolution (Biol.), a theory of evolution which holds that the transmutation of species is not always gradual, but that there may come sudden and marked variations. See Saltation., Solid Sol"id, n. 1. A substance that is held in a fixed form by cohesion among its particles; a substance not fluid. 2. (Geom.) A magnitude which has length, breadth, and thickness; a part of space bounded on all sides. Solid of revolution. (Geom.) See Revolution, n., 5.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for evolution.

- evolution is the change in the inherited characteristics of biological population s over successive generation s. evolutionary
- the mitsubishi lancer evolution, also known as the evo is a high-performance sports car manufactured by mitsubishi motors that is based
- sociocultural evolution(ism) is an umbrella term for theories of cultural evolution and social evolution , describing how culture s and
- evolution (formerly novell evolution and ximian evolution, prior to novell 's 2003 acquisition of ximian ) is the official personal
- stellar evolution is the process by which a star undergoes a sequence of radical changes during its lifetime. depending on the mass of
- evolution, the international journal of organic evolution, is a monthly scientific journal that publishes significant new results of
- the creation–evolution controversy (also termed the creation vs. evolution debate or the origins debate) involves a recurring cultural,
- human evolution is the evolutionary process leading up to the appearance of modern humans . while it began with the last common ancestor
- darwin published his theory of evolution with compelling evidence in his 1859 book on the origin of species , overcoming scientific
- evolution is a 2001 american science fiction comedy film directed by ivan reitman and starring david duchovny , orlando jones , seann


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Help for word Evolutional.

Evolutional Ev`o*lu"tion*al, a. Relating to evolution. ``Evolutional changes.' --H. Spenser.


Wiki for Evolutional.

- the green-beard effect is a hypothesis used in evolutional biology to explain altruism between individuals and is linked to the gene-
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- org/details/evolutionalethic00evanrichand evolutional ethics and animal psychology and in 1906 http://www. archive. org/details/
- 'the beginning of the end of extraction (evolutional slow down)' – 1:36 ' 'the executive furies of the robot lord of death' – 1:28 '
- language and the description of the evolution of the bantu languages. references: african and evolutional linguistics. in russian.
- later that year kebee released a solo album evolutional poems through which both he and the label began to become more well known
- this gives humanity a possibility through energy of his spirit to influence on evolutional creation of cosmos… in every creation the human
- evolution is the change in the inherited characteristics of biological population s over successive generation s. evolutionary
- series classic characters and gameplay with the concept of evolution. collapsed yes , headline evolutional theory , title1 ancestor ,
- neuropsychology and evolutional psychology, and how changes in human rational decision making could impact organisations and their strategy.
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Help for word evolutionary.

Evolutionary Ev`o*lu"tion*a*ry, a. Relating to evolution; as, evolutionary discussions.


Wiki for evolutionary.



Help for word evolutioned.

Anomalistic A*nom`a*lis"tic, Anomalistical A*nom`a*lis"tic*al, a. [Cf. F. anomalistique.] 1. Irregular; departing from common or established rules. 2. (Astron.) Pertaining to the anomaly, or angular distance of a planet from its perihelion. Anomalistic month. See under Month. Anomalistic revolution, the period in which a planet or satellite goes through the complete cycles of its changes of anomaly, or from any point in its elliptic orbit to the same again. Anomalistic, or Periodical year. See under Year., Axis Ax"is, n.; pl. Axes. [L. axis axis, axle. See Axle.] A straight line, real or imaginary, passing through a body, on which it revolves, or may be supposed to revolve; a line passing through a body or system around which the parts are symmetrically arranged. 2. (Math.) A straight line with respect to which the different parts of a magnitude are symmetrically arranged; as, the axis of a cylinder, i. e., the axis of a cone, that is, the straight line joining the vertex and the center of the base; the axis of a circle, any straight line passing through the center. 3. (Bot.) The stem; the central part, or longitudinal support, on which organs or parts are arranged; the central line of any body. --Gray. 4. (Anat.) (a) The second vertebra of the neck, or vertebra dentata. (b) Also used of the body only of the vertebra, which is prolonged anteriorly within the foramen of the first vertebra or atlas, so as to form the odontoid process or peg which serves as a pivot for the atlas and head to turn upon. 5. (Crystallog.) One of several imaginary lines, assumed in describing the position of the planes by which a crystal is bounded. 6. (Fine Arts) The primary or secondary central line of any design. Anticlinal axis (Geol.), a line or ridge from which the strata slope downward on the two opposite sides. Synclinal axis, a line from which the strata slope upward in opposite directions, so as to form a valley. Axis cylinder (Anat.), the neuraxis or essential, central substance of a nerve fiber; -- called also axis band, axial fiber, and cylinder axis. Axis in peritrochio, the wheel and axle, one of the mechanical powers. Axis of a curve (Geom.), a straight line which bisects a system of parallel chords of a curve; called a principal axis, when cutting them at right angles, in which case it divides the curve into two symmetrical portions, as in the parabola, which has one such axis, the ellipse, which has two, or the circle, which has an infinite number. The two axes of the ellipse are the major axis and the minor axis, and the two axes of the hyperbola are the transverse axis and the conjugate axis. Axis of a lens, the straight line passing through its center and perpendicular to its surfaces. Axis of a telescope or microscope, the straight line with which coincide the axes of the several lenses which compose it. Axes of co["o]rdinates in a plane, two straight lines intersecting each other, to which points are referred for the purpose of determining their relative position: they are either rectangular or oblique. Axes of co["o]rdinates in space, the three straight lines in which the co["o]rdinate planes intersect each other. Axis of a balance, that line about which it turns. Axis of oscillation, of a pendulum, a right line passing through the center about which it vibrates, and perpendicular to the plane of vibration. Axis of polarization, the central line around which the prismatic rings or curves are arranged. --Brewster. Axis of revolution (Descriptive Geom.), a straight line about which some line or plane is revolved, so that the several points of the line or plane shall describe circles with their centers in the fixed line, and their planes perpendicular to it, the line describing a surface of revolution, and the plane a solid of revolution. Axis of symmetry (Geom.), any line in a plane figure which divides the figure into two such parts that one part, when folded over along the axis, shall coincide with the other part. Axis of the equator, ecliptic, horizon (or other circle considered with reference to the sphere on which it lies), the diameter of the sphere which is perpendicular to the plane of the circle. --Hutton. Axis of the Ionic capital (Arch.), a line passing perpendicularly through the middle of the eye of the volute. Neutral axis (Mech.), the line of demarcation between the horizontal elastic forces of tension and compression, exerted by the fibers in any cross section of a girder. Optic axis of a crystal, the direction in which a ray of transmitted light suffers no double refraction. All crystals, not of the isometric system, are either uniaxial or biaxial. Optic axis, Visual axis (Opt.), the straight line passing through the center of the pupil, and perpendicular to the surface of the eye. Radical axis of two circles (Geom.), the straight line perpendicular to the line joining their centers and such that the tangents from any point of it to the two circles shall be equal to each other. Spiral axis (Arch.), the axis of a twisted column drawn spirally in order to trace the circumvolutions without. Axis of abscissas and Axis of ordinates. See Abscissa., Counter Coun"ter, a. Contrary; opposite; contrasted; opposed; adverse; antagonistic; as, a counter current; a counter revolution; a counter poison; a counter agent; counter fugue. ``Innumerable facts attesting the counter principle.' --I. Taylor. Counter approach (Fort.), a trench or work pushed forward from defensive works to meet the approaches of besiegers. See Approach. Counter bond (Law), in old practice, a bond to secure one who has given bond for another. Counter brace. See Counter brace, in Vocabulary. Counter deed (Law), a secret writing which destroys, invalidates, or alters, a public deed. Counter distinction, contradistinction. [Obs.] Counter drain, a drain at the foot of the embankment of a canal or watercourse, for carrying off the water that may soak through. Counter extension (Surg.), the fixation of the upper part of a limb, while extension is practiced on the lower part, as in cases of luxation or fracture. Counter fissure (Surg.) Same as Contrafissure. Counter indication. (Med.) Same as Contraindication. Counter irritant (Med.), an irritant to produce a blister, a pustular eruption, or other irritation in some part of the body, in order to relieve an existing irritation in some other part. ``Counter irritants are of as great use in moral as in physical diseases.' --Macaulay. Counter irritation (Med.), the act or the result of applying a counter irritant. Counter opening, an aperture or vent on the opposite side, or in a different place. Counter parole (Mil.), a word in addition to the password, given in time of alarm as a signal. Counter plea (Law), a replication to a plea. --Cowell. Counter pressure, force or pressure that acts in a contrary direction to some other opposing pressure. Counter project, a project, scheme, or proposal brought forward in opposition to another, as in the negotiation of a treaty. --Swift. Counter proof, in engraving, a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the engraver to inspect the state of the plate. Counter revolution, a revolution opposed to a former one, and restoring a former state of things. Counter revolutionist, one engaged in, or befriending, a counter revolution. Counter round (Mil.), a body of officers whose duty it is to visit and inspect the rounds and sentinels. Counter sea (Naut.), a sea running in an opposite direction from the wind. Counter sense, opposite meaning. Counter signal, a signal to answer or correspond to another. Counter signature, the name of a secretary or other officer countersigned to a writing. --Tooke. Counter slope, an overhanging slope; as, a wall with a counter slope. --Mahan. Counter statement, a statement made in opposition to, or denial of, another statement. Counter surety, a counter bond, or a surety to secure one who has given security. Counter tally, a tally corresponding to another. Counter tide, contrary tide., Counter Coun"ter, a. Contrary; opposite; contrasted; opposed; adverse; antagonistic; as, a counter current; a counter revolution; a counter poison; a counter agent; counter fugue. ``Innumerable facts attesting the counter principle.' --I. Taylor. Counter approach (Fort.), a trench or work pushed forward from defensive works to meet the approaches of besiegers. See Approach. Counter bond (Law), in old practice, a bond to secure one who has given bond for another. Counter brace. See Counter brace, in Vocabulary. Counter deed (Law), a secret writing which destroys, invalidates, or alters, a public deed. Counter distinction, contradistinction. [Obs.] Counter drain, a drain at the foot of the embankment of a canal or watercourse, for carrying off the water that may soak through. Counter extension (Surg.), the fixation of the upper part of a limb, while extension is practiced on the lower part, as in cases of luxation or fracture. Counter fissure (Surg.) Same as Contrafissure. Counter indication. (Med.) Same as Contraindication. Counter irritant (Med.), an irritant to produce a blister, a pustular eruption, or other irritation in some part of the body, in order to relieve an existing irritation in some other part. ``Counter irritants are of as great use in moral as in physical diseases.' --Macaulay. Counter irritation (Med.), the act or the result of applying a counter irritant. Counter opening, an aperture or vent on the opposite side, or in a different place. Counter parole (Mil.), a word in addition to the password, given in time of alarm as a signal. Counter plea (Law), a replication to a plea. --Cowell. Counter pressure, force or pressure that acts in a contrary direction to some other opposing pressure. Counter project, a project, scheme, or proposal brought forward in opposition to another, as in the negotiation of a treaty. --Swift. Counter proof, in engraving, a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the engraver to inspect the state of the plate. Counter revolution, a revolution opposed to a former one, and restoring a former state of things. Counter revolutionist, one engaged in, or befriending, a counter revolution. Counter round (Mil.), a body of officers whose duty it is to visit and inspect the rounds and sentinels. Counter sea (Naut.), a sea running in an opposite direction from the wind. Counter sense, opposite meaning. Counter signal, a signal to answer or correspond to another. Counter signature, the name of a secretary or other officer countersigned to a writing. --Tooke. Counter slope, an overhanging slope; as, a wall with a counter slope. --Mahan. Counter statement, a statement made in opposition to, or denial of, another statement. Counter surety, a counter bond, or a surety to secure one who has given security. Counter tally, a tally corresponding to another. Counter tide, contrary tide., Ellipsoid El*lip"soid, n. [Ellipse + -oid: cf. F. ellipsoide.] (Geom.) A solid, all plane sections of which are ellipses or circles. See Conoid, n., 2 (a) . Note: The ellipsoid has three principal plane sections, a, b, and c, each at right angles to the other two, and each dividing the solid into two equal and symmetrical parts. The lines of meeting of these principal sections are the axes, or principal diameters of the ellipsoid. The point where the three planes meet is the center. Ellipsoid of revolution, a spheroid; a solid figure generated by the revolution of an ellipse about one of its axes. It is called a prolate spheroid, or prolatum, when the ellipse is revolved about the major axis, and an oblate spheroid, or oblatum, when it is revolved about the minor axis., Evolutional Ev`o*lu"tion*al, a. Relating to evolution. ``Evolutional changes.' --H. Spenser., Evolutionary Ev`o*lu"tion*a*ry, a. Relating to evolution; as, evolutionary discussions., Evolutionism Ev`o*lu"tion*ism, n. The theory of, or belief in, evolution. See Evolution, 6 and 7., Evolutionist Ev`o*lu"tion*ist, n. 1. One skilled in evolutions. 2. one who holds the doctrine of evolution, either in biology or in metaphysics. --Darwin., Hyperboloid Hy*per"bo*loid, n. [Hyperbola + -oid: cf. F. hyperbolo["i]de.] (Geom.) A surface of the second order, which is cut by certain planes in hyperbolas; also, the solid, bounded in part by such a surface. Hyperboloid of revolution, an hyperboloid described by an hyperbola revolving about one of its axes. The surface has two separate sheets when the axis of revolution is the transverse axis, but only one when the axis of revolution is the conjugate axis of the hyperbola., Vertex Ver"tex, n.; pl. Vertexes, L. Vertices. [L. vertex, -icis, a whirl, top of the head, top, summit, from vertere to turn. See Verse, and cf. Vortex.] A turning point; the principal or highest point; top; summit; crown; apex. Specifically: (a) (Anat.) The top, or crown, of the head. (b) (Anat.) The zenith, or the point of the heavens directly overhead. (c) (Math.) The point in any figure opposite to, and farthest from, the base; the terminating point of some particular line or lines in a figure or a curve; the top, or the point opposite the base. Note: The principal vertex of a conic section is, in the parabola, the vertex of the axis of the curve: in the ellipse, either extremity of either axis, but usually the left-hand vertex of the transverse axis; in the hyperbola, either vertex, but usually the right-hand vertex of the transverse axis. Vertex of a curve (Math.), the point in which the axis of the curve intersects it. Vertex of an angle (Math.), the point in which the sides of the angle meet. Vertex of a solid, or of a surface of revolution (Math.), the point in which the axis pierces the surface., Revolutionary Rev`o*lu"tion*a*ry, n. A revolutionist. [R.] Dumfries was a Tory town, and could not tolerate a revolutionary. --Prof. Wilson., Revolutioner Rev`o*lu"tion*er, n. One who is engaged in effecting a revolution; a revolutionist. --Smollett., Revolutionize Rev`o*lu"tion*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Revolutioniezed; p. pr. & vb. n. Revolutionizing.] To change completely, as by a revolution; as, to revolutionize a government. --Ames. The gospel . . . has revolutionized his soul. --J. M. Mason., Revolutionism Rev`o*lu"tion*ism, n. The state of being in revolution; revolutionary doctrines or principles., Revolutionist Rev`o*lu"tion*ist, n. One engaged in effecting a change of government; a favorer of revolution. --Burke., Revolutionize Rev`o*lu"tion*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Revolutioniezed; p. pr. & vb. n. Revolutionizing.] To change completely, as by a revolution; as, to revolutionize a government. --Ames. The gospel . . . has revolutionized his soul. --J. M. Mason., Revolutionize Rev`o*lu"tion*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Revolutioniezed; p. pr. & vb. n. Revolutionizing.] To change completely, as by a revolution; as, to revolutionize a government. --Ames. The gospel . . . has revolutionized his soul. --J. M. Mason., Saltatory Sal"ta*to"ry, a. [L. saltatorius. See Saltant, and cf. Saltire.] Leaping or dancing; having the power of, or used in, leaping or dancing. Saltatory evolution (Biol.), a theory of evolution which holds that the transmutation of species is not always gradual, but that there may come sudden and marked variations. See Saltation., Solid Sol"id, n. 1. A substance that is held in a fixed form by cohesion among its particles; a substance not fluid. 2. (Geom.) A magnitude which has length, breadth, and thickness; a part of space bounded on all sides. Solid of revolution. (Geom.) See Revolution, n., 5.


Wiki for evolutioned.

- evolution is the change in the inherited characteristics of biological population s over successive generation s. evolutionary
- the mitsubishi lancer evolution, also known as the evo is a high-performance sports car manufactured by mitsubishi motors that is based
- sociocultural evolution(ism) is an umbrella term for theories of cultural evolution and social evolution , describing how culture s and
- evolution (formerly novell evolution and ximian evolution, prior to novell 's 2003 acquisition of ximian ) is the official personal
- stellar evolution is the process by which a star undergoes a sequence of radical changes during its lifetime. depending on the mass of
- evolution, the international journal of organic evolution, is a monthly scientific journal that publishes significant new results of
- the creation–evolution controversy (also termed the creation vs. evolution debate or the origins debate) involves a recurring cultural,
- human evolution is the evolutionary process leading up to the appearance of modern humans . while it began with the last common ancestor
- darwin published his theory of evolution with compelling evidence in his 1859 book on the origin of species , overcoming scientific
- evolution is a 2001 american science fiction comedy film directed by ivan reitman and starring david duchovny , orlando jones , seann



Help for word evolutionis.

Counter Coun"ter, a. Contrary; opposite; contrasted; opposed; adverse; antagonistic; as, a counter current; a counter revolution; a counter poison; a counter agent; counter fugue. ``Innumerable facts attesting the counter principle.' --I. Taylor. Counter approach (Fort.), a trench or work pushed forward from defensive works to meet the approaches of besiegers. See Approach. Counter bond (Law), in old practice, a bond to secure one who has given bond for another. Counter brace. See Counter brace, in Vocabulary. Counter deed (Law), a secret writing which destroys, invalidates, or alters, a public deed. Counter distinction, contradistinction. [Obs.] Counter drain, a drain at the foot of the embankment of a canal or watercourse, for carrying off the water that may soak through. Counter extension (Surg.), the fixation of the upper part of a limb, while extension is practiced on the lower part, as in cases of luxation or fracture. Counter fissure (Surg.) Same as Contrafissure. Counter indication. (Med.) Same as Contraindication. Counter irritant (Med.), an irritant to produce a blister, a pustular eruption, or other irritation in some part of the body, in order to relieve an existing irritation in some other part. ``Counter irritants are of as great use in moral as in physical diseases.' --Macaulay. Counter irritation (Med.), the act or the result of applying a counter irritant. Counter opening, an aperture or vent on the opposite side, or in a different place. Counter parole (Mil.), a word in addition to the password, given in time of alarm as a signal. Counter plea (Law), a replication to a plea. --Cowell. Counter pressure, force or pressure that acts in a contrary direction to some other opposing pressure. Counter project, a project, scheme, or proposal brought forward in opposition to another, as in the negotiation of a treaty. --Swift. Counter proof, in engraving, a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the engraver to inspect the state of the plate. Counter revolution, a revolution opposed to a former one, and restoring a former state of things. Counter revolutionist, one engaged in, or befriending, a counter revolution. Counter round (Mil.), a body of officers whose duty it is to visit and inspect the rounds and sentinels. Counter sea (Naut.), a sea running in an opposite direction from the wind. Counter sense, opposite meaning. Counter signal, a signal to answer or correspond to another. Counter signature, the name of a secretary or other officer countersigned to a writing. --Tooke. Counter slope, an overhanging slope; as, a wall with a counter slope. --Mahan. Counter statement, a statement made in opposition to, or denial of, another statement. Counter surety, a counter bond, or a surety to secure one who has given security. Counter tally, a tally corresponding to another. Counter tide, contrary tide., Evolutionism Ev`o*lu"tion*ism, n. The theory of, or belief in, evolution. See Evolution, 6 and 7., Evolutionist Ev`o*lu"tion*ist, n. 1. One skilled in evolutions. 2. one who holds the doctrine of evolution, either in biology or in metaphysics. --Darwin., Revolutionize Rev`o*lu"tion*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Revolutioniezed; p. pr. & vb. n. Revolutionizing.] To change completely, as by a revolution; as, to revolutionize a government. --Ames. The gospel . . . has revolutionized his soul. --J. M. Mason., Revolutionism Rev`o*lu"tion*ism, n. The state of being in revolution; revolutionary doctrines or principles., Revolutionist Rev`o*lu"tion*ist, n. One engaged in effecting a change of government; a favorer of revolution. --Burke., Revolutionize Rev`o*lu"tion*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Revolutioniezed; p. pr. & vb. n. Revolutionizing.] To change completely, as by a revolution; as, to revolutionize a government. --Ames. The gospel . . . has revolutionized his soul. --J. M. Mason., Revolutionize Rev`o*lu"tion*ize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Revolutioniezed; p. pr. & vb. n. Revolutionizing.] To change completely, as by a revolution; as, to revolutionize a government. --Ames. The gospel . . . has revolutionized his soul. --J. M. Mason.


Wiki for evolutionis.

- the type species is darwinsaurus evolutionis. the generic name honours charles darwin for his theory of evolution. the specific name
- rising field of molecular biology the term 'light of evolution'—or sub specie evolutionis—had been used earlier by biologist julian huxley .
- x , author kok b, forbush b, mcgloin m , title cooperation of charges in photosynthetic o2 evolution-i. a linear four step mechanism ,
- research: darwinsaurus evolutionis (genus and species) huxleysaurus hollingtoniensis (genus) the first three of these are now commonly
- this specimen to the species hypselospinus fittoni, while paul (2012) made it the holotype of a separate species darwinsaurus evolutionis .
- the type species is darwinsaurus evolutionis, and the holotype is an associated skeleton that includes material catalogued under numbers
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Help for word Evolutionism.

Evolutionism Ev`o*lu"tion*ism, n. The theory of, or belief in, evolution. See Evolution, 6 and 7.


Wiki for Evolutionism.



Help for word Evolutionist.

Evolutionist Ev`o*lu"tion*ist, n. 1. One skilled in evolutions. 2. one who holds the doctrine of evolution, either in biology or in metaphysics. --Darwin.


Wiki for Evolutionist.

- last1 torrey , first1 harry beal , last2 felin , first2 frances , title was aristotle an evolutionist? , journal the quarterly review of
- while sociocultural evolutionists agree that an evolution-like process leads to social progress , classical social evolutionists have
- creationists often call those who accept the validity of the modern evolutionary synthesis 'evolutionists' and the theory itself as 'evolutionism.'
- while social evolutionists agree that the evolution-like process leads to the social progress , classical social evolutionists have
- evolutionist liberal party (partido liberal evolucionista) was a political party in the dominican republic , founded by fernando amiama tió
- evolutionist liberal party of ceará. (partido liberal evolucionista do ceará. was a political party in the ceará , brazil . the party
- it was strongly attacked by the scientific establishment at the time, but later more sophisticated theistic evolutionists followed the
- darwin: the life of a tormented evolutionist is a biography of charles darwin by adrian desmond and james moore . it is considered one
- it can even refer to metaphysical evolution , spiritual evolution , or any of a number of evolutionist philosophies. when biological
- william chilton (1815 – 28 may 1855), was a printer, owenite socialist , evolutionist, and co-founder with charles southwell of the oracle
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