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Definition for word force.

Force Force, v. t. [See Farce to stuff.] To stuff; to lard; to farce. [R.] Wit larded with malice, and malice forced with wit. --Shak., Force Force, n. [Of Scand. origin; cf. Icel. fors, foss, Dan. fos.] A waterfall; a cascade. [Prov. Eng.] To see the falls for force of the river Kent. --T. Gray., Force Force, n. [F. force, LL. forcia, fortia, fr. L. fortis strong. See Fort, n.] 1. Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigor; might; often, an unusual degree of strength or energy; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect; especially, power to persuade, or convince, or impose obligation; pertinency; validity; special signification; as, the force of an appeal, an argument, a contract, or a term. He was, in the full force of the words, a good man. --Macaulay. 2. Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion. Which now they hold by force, and not by right. --Shak. 3. Strength or power for war; hence, a body of land or naval combatants, with their appurtenances, ready for action; -- an armament; troops; warlike array; -- often in the plural; hence, a body of men prepared for action in other ways; as, the laboring force of a plantation. Is Lucius general of the forces? --Shak. 4. (Law) (a) Strength or power exercised without law, or contrary to law, upon persons or things; violence. (b) Validity; efficacy. --Burrill. 5. (Physics) Any action between two bodies which changes, or tends to change, their relative condition as to rest or motion; or, more generally, which changes, or tends to change, any physical relation between them, whether mechanical, thermal, chemical, electrical, magnetic, or of any other kind; as, the force of gravity; cohesive force; centrifugal force. Animal force (Physiol.), muscular force or energy. Catabiotic force [Gr. ? down (intens.) + ? life.] (Biol.), the influence exerted by living structures on adjoining cells, by which the latter are developed in harmony with the primary structures. Centrifugal force, Centripetal force, Coercive force, etc. See under Centrifugal, Centripetal, etc. Composition of forces, Correlation of forces, etc. See under Composition, Correlation, etc. Force and arms [trans. of L. vi et armis] (Law), an expression in old indictments, signifying violence. In force, or Of force, of unimpaired efficacy; valid; of full virtue; not suspended or reversed. ``A testament is of force after men are dead.' --Heb. ix. 17. Metabolic force (Physiol.), the influence which causes and controls the metabolism of the body. No force, no matter of urgency or consequence; no account; hence, to do no force, to make no account of; not to heed. [Obs.] --Chaucer. Of force, of necessity; unavoidably; imperatively. ``Good reasons must, of force, give place to better.' --Shak. Plastic force (Physiol.), the force which presumably acts in the growth and repair of the tissues. Vital force (Physiol.), that force or power which is inherent in organization; that form of energy which is the cause of the vital phenomena of the body, as distinguished from the physical forces generally known. Syn: Strength; vigor; might; energy; stress; vehemence; violence; compulsion; coaction; constraint; coercion. Usage: Force, Strength. Strength looks rather to power as an inward capability or energy. Thus we speak of the strength of timber, bodily strength, mental strength, strength of emotion, etc. Force, on the other hand, looks more to the outward; as, the force of gravitation, force of circumstances, force of habit, etc. We do, indeed, speak of strength of will and force of will; but even here the former may lean toward the internal tenacity of purpose, and the latter toward the outward expression of it in action. But, though the two words do in a few cases touch thus closely on each other, there is, on the whole, a marked distinction in our use of force and strength. ``Force is the name given, in mechanical science, to whatever produces, or can produce, motion.' --Nichol. Thy tears are of no force to mollify This flinty man. --Heywood. More huge in strength than wise in works he was. --Spenser. Adam and first matron Eve Had ended now their orisons, and found Strength added from above, new hope to spring Out of despair. --Milton., Force Force, v. i. [Obs. in all the senses.] 1. To use violence; to make violent effort; to strive; to endeavor. Forcing with gifts to win his wanton heart. --Spenser. 2. To make a difficult matter of anything; to labor; to hesitate; hence, to force of, to make much account of; to regard. Your oath once broke, you force not to forswear. --Shak. I force not of such fooleries. --Camden. 3. To be of force, importance, or weight; to matter. It is not sufficient to have attained the name and dignity of a shepherd, not forcing how. --Udall.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for force.

- in physics , a force is any influence that causes an object to undergo a certain change, either concerning its movement, direction, or
- forcé is a commune in the mayenne department in north-western france . see also : communes of the mayenne department category:communes of
- force is what causes mass to accelerate or become deformed. force may also refer to: in science : forcing (mathematics), a proof-technique of
- facing our risk of cancer empowered (f.o.r.c.e.) is a non-profit organization and an active web-based community for women at high risk of
- the force is a binding, metaphysical , and ubiquitous power in the fictional universe of the star wars galaxy created by george lucas .
- a police force is a constituted body of persons empowered by the state to enforce the law , protect property, and limit civil disorder
- the british army sent the british expeditionary force to france and belgium to prevent germany from occupying these countries the british
- g-force (with g from gravitational) is a measurement of acceleration felt as weight . it is not a force, but a force per unit mass and can
- a military is an organization authorized by its greater society to use lethal force , usually including use of weapons, in defending its
- western force is a rugby union team based in perth , western australia playing in the international super rugby competition.


We found definition for force you search from dictionaries , wikipedia mentions for force.

Similar meaning for word force.



Help for word Force-and-arms.

Force Force, n. [F. force, LL. forcia, fortia, fr. L. fortis strong. See Fort, n.] 1. Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigor; might; often, an unusual degree of strength or energy; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect; especially, power to persuade, or convince, or impose obligation; pertinency; validity; special signification; as, the force of an appeal, an argument, a contract, or a term. He was, in the full force of the words, a good man. --Macaulay. 2. Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion. Which now they hold by force, and not by right. --Shak. 3. Strength or power for war; hence, a body of land or naval combatants, with their appurtenances, ready for action; -- an armament; troops; warlike array; -- often in the plural; hence, a body of men prepared for action in other ways; as, the laboring force of a plantation. Is Lucius general of the forces? --Shak. 4. (Law) (a) Strength or power exercised without law, or contrary to law, upon persons or things; violence. (b) Validity; efficacy. --Burrill. 5. (Physics) Any action between two bodies which changes, or tends to change, their relative condition as to rest or motion; or, more generally, which changes, or tends to change, any physical relation between them, whether mechanical, thermal, chemical, electrical, magnetic, or of any other kind; as, the force of gravity; cohesive force; centrifugal force. Animal force (Physiol.), muscular force or energy. Catabiotic force [Gr. ? down (intens.) + ? life.] (Biol.), the influence exerted by living structures on adjoining cells, by which the latter are developed in harmony with the primary structures. Centrifugal force, Centripetal force, Coercive force, etc. See under Centrifugal, Centripetal, etc. Composition of forces, Correlation of forces, etc. See under Composition, Correlation, etc. Force and arms [trans. of L. vi et armis] (Law), an expression in old indictments, signifying violence. In force, or Of force, of unimpaired efficacy; valid; of full virtue; not suspended or reversed. ``A testament is of force after men are dead.' --Heb. ix. 17. Metabolic force (Physiol.), the influence which causes and controls the metabolism of the body. No force, no matter of urgency or consequence; no account; hence, to do no force, to make no account of; not to heed. [Obs.] --Chaucer. Of force, of necessity; unavoidably; imperatively. ``Good reasons must, of force, give place to better.' --Shak. Plastic force (Physiol.), the force which presumably acts in the growth and repair of the tissues. Vital force (Physiol.), that force or power which is inherent in organization; that form of energy which is the cause of the vital phenomena of the body, as distinguished from the physical forces generally known. Syn: Strength; vigor; might; energy; stress; vehemence; violence; compulsion; coaction; constraint; coercion. Usage: Force, Strength. Strength looks rather to power as an inward capability or energy. Thus we speak of the strength of timber, bodily strength, mental strength, strength of emotion, etc. Force, on the other hand, looks more to the outward; as, the force of gravitation, force of circumstances, force of habit, etc. We do, indeed, speak of strength of will and force of will; but even here the former may lean toward the internal tenacity of purpose, and the latter toward the outward expression of it in action. But, though the two words do in a few cases touch thus closely on each other, there is, on the whole, a marked distinction in our use of force and strength. ``Force is the name given, in mechanical science, to whatever produces, or can produce, motion.' --Nichol. Thy tears are of no force to mollify This flinty man. --Heywood. More huge in strength than wise in works he was. --Spenser. Adam and first matron Eve Had ended now their orisons, and found Strength added from above, new hope to spring Out of despair. --Milton.


Wiki for Force-and-arms.

- the zero retention force arming unit (zrfau) is an electro mechanical device used on military aircraft bomb racks to arm munitions as they
- the armenian air force is the air arm formed by independent armenia in 1992 in the wake of the dissolution of the soviet union .
- air command is the operational arm of the royal australian air force (raaf). manage and command the raaf's force element group s (fegs),
- raaf command was the main operational arm of the royal australian air force (raaf) during world war ii. september 1942 and by april 1943
- the tongan maritime force is the naval arm of the tonga defence services . the pacific-class patrol craft were provided to tonga by
- force 14 is the aerial arm of the fatah , the largest palestinian faction within the palestine liberation organization . palestinian air
- panzerwaffe (german for 'armoured force', 'armoured arm' or 'tank force'. waffe: 'arm') refers to a command within the heer of the
- air force was the air arm of the armed forces of the second spanish republic , the legally established government of spain between 1931
- the air component (luchtcomponent, composante air), formerly the belgian air force, is the air arm of the belgian armed forces .
- torque, moment or moment of force (see the terminology below), is the tendency of the length of the lever arm connecting the axis to the



Help for word force-function.

Potential Po*ten"tial, n. 1. Anything that may be possible; a possibility; potentially. --Bacon. 2. (Math.) In the theory of gravitation, or of other forces acting in space, a function of the rectangular coordinates which determine the position of a point, such that its differential coefficients with respect to the co["o]rdinates are equal to the components of the force at the point considered; -- also called potential function, or force function. It is called also Newtonian potential when the force is directed to a fixed center and is inversely as the square of the distance from the center. 3. (Elec.) The energy of an electrical charge measured by its power to do work; hence, the degree of electrification as referred to some standard, as that of the earth; electro-motive force.


Wiki for force-function.

- forcing function can mean: in differential calculus, a forcing function (differential equations) in interaction design, a behavior-shaping
- in a system of differential equations used to describe a time-dependent process, a forcing function is a function that appears in the
- the strength and direction of some force , such as the magnetic or be represented as a vector-valued function that associates an n-tuple
- a behavior-shaping constraint, also sometimes referred to as a forcing function or poka-yoke , is a technique used in error-tolerant design
- in classical mechanics , a central force on an object is a force whose magnitude f is a vector valued force function , f is a scalar valued
- in the context of molecular modeling , a force field refers to the form and parameter s of mathematical functions used to describe the
- pairwise force functions: using the abbreviated notation u u(x,t) and u'u(x',t)newton's third law places the following restriction on f:\
- lsp usa , 1959 us air force , payload user us air force , orbit suborbital , function missile test , d-date 1 october , outcome
- the united states air force (usaf) is the aerial warfare service branch of the the usaf articulates its core functions as nuclear
- z force was a forward observation force attached to the british general staff z force's function was to obtain information for the



Help for word Force-pump.

Force pump Force" pump` (Mach.) (a) A pump having a solid piston, or plunger, for drawing and forcing a liquid, as water, through the valves; in distinction from a pump having a bucket, or valved piston. (b) A pump adapted for delivering water at a considerable height above the pump, or under a considerable pressure; in distinction from one which lifts the water only to the top of the pump or delivers it through a spout. See Illust. of Plunger pump, under Plunger.


Wiki for Force-pump.

- a pump is a device that moves fluids (liquid s or gas es), or sometimes slurries , trapping a fixed amount and forcing (displacing) that
- a bilge pump is a water pump used to remove bilge water . ancient bilge 'force pumps' had a number of common uses. where the pump was
- force pump: file:heron2. jpg , hero's fire-engine ctesibius is credited with the invention of the force pump , which vitruvius describes as
- the pulsometer steam pump is a pistonless pump which was patented in 1872 by was introduced under pressure and so it acted as a force pump.
- a ram press is a device or machine commonly used to press items with a mechanical ram such as with a plunger , piston , force pump , or
- 'the other side ', re-establishing the band as a serious musical force pump was a critical and commercial success, eventually selling 7
- a piston is a component of reciprocating engine s, reciprocating pump s, gas in a pump, the function is reversed and force is transferred
- a domestic hot water circulating pump a centrifugal pump whose purpose is to force the water flow in the main supply conduction and in the
- principally to pump water out of mines , starting in the early 18th century. james dead-weight force pumps were used, the work of the
- including a water pump invented by ctesibius of alexandria in the third century were only force pump s and had a very short range due to



Help for word forced.

Forced Forced, a. Done or produced with force or great labor, or by extraordinary exertion; hurried; strained; produced by unnatural effort or pressure; as, a forced style; a forced laugh. Forced draught. See under Draught. Forced march (Mil.), a march of one or more days made with all possible speed. -- For"ced*ly, adv. -- For"ced*ness, n.


Wiki for forced.

- force (disambiguation) , forcing expiry 2014-05-03t13:36:02z , small yes bgcolour default , name force , image file:force examples.
- http://medical-dictionary. thefreedictionary. com/masticatory+force masticatory force or force of mastication is defined as a force , which
- brown, jeff lcb (18/18), 6.01, 170, 22, liberty baptist, 73 tkl/14 ast, 1 forc fumb, 6 ints/47 yds 38. taylor, billy fb (15/13), 6.00, 215
- the major forc of the front in punjab is brick kiln workers, rural peasant s, mnrega workers and trade union workers. prominent leaders of
- html uc davis forc group, introduction to forc diagrams. category:articles with inconsistent citation formats category:geology category:
- subsequently, this group explained that fluid motion occurs due to the presence of a kelvin body forc e that has two terms. the first term
- external links : forc. org/public/journals/38#255 , last low , first michael j. , year 2005 , title it's the end of the world as we know it
- non-exhaustive list of battle labs : mil/au/awc/awcgate/awc-forc. htm#batlab here. other battle labs: , ! name ! acronym ! country !
- external links : forc. org/public/journals/43#286 misrepresentation and rescission of insurance contracts. forc journal. http://www.
- external links -: forc. org/public/journals/9#57 the validity of arbitration agreements in insurance policies. forc journal 15(4).
-



Help for word Forced-draught.

Forced Forced, a. Done or produced with force or great labor, or by extraordinary exertion; hurried; strained; produced by unnatural effort or pressure; as, a forced style; a forced laugh. Forced draught. See under Draught. Forced march (Mil.), a march of one or more days made with all possible speed. -- For"ced*ly, adv. -- For"ced*ness, n.


Wiki for Forced-draught.

- types of draught can also be divided into induced draught, where exhaust gases are pulled out of the boiler; forced draught, where fresh
- forced draught: rendel and alfred yarrow pioneered the use of forced-draught fans in boiler rooms, significantly increasing the power of
- 21 november 1913) was a scottish engineer and inventor who is noted for his invention of the howden forced draught system for steam boilers.
- she could make 20 , kn , km/h with forced draught and 18 , kn , km/h with natural draught. she was a very good sea boat and an exceptional
- normand water-tube boiler s which could give 7000 , hp for limited periods of time with forced draught, and 5000 , hp under natural draught.
- the engines generated 13000 , ihp , kw , lk in under natural draught and 20000 , ihp , kw with forced draught, giving a speed of 22 , kn
- collingwood was the first royal navy battleship to be equipped with forced draught this was a system in which air was forced into the
- on natural draught or 19+1/4 , kn , km/h , 0 with forced draught . construction: rattlesnake was laid down at laird brothers ' birkenhead
- reciprocating engine s and five boilers that gave 7000 indicated horsepower (ihp) using natural draught and 9000 , ihp , abbr on using forced draught.
- under forced draught, or 7500 , ihp , kw , abbr on under open draught she was also the first royal navy ship to be equipped with a steam



Help for word Forced-march.

Forced Forced, a. Done or produced with force or great labor, or by extraordinary exertion; hurried; strained; produced by unnatural effort or pressure; as, a forced style; a forced laugh. Forced draught. See under Draught. Forced march (Mil.), a march of one or more days made with all possible speed. -- For"ced*ly, adv. -- For"ced*ness, n.


Wiki for Forced-march.

- a death march is a forced march of prisoners of war or other captives or deportees with the intent to kill, brutalize, weaken and/or
- death marches (todesmärsche in german) refer to the forcible movements of prisoners on arrival at their destination, they were then forced
- 'the march' refers to a series of forced marches during the final stages of the second world war in europe. 000 pows were forced to march
- crisis , it was released in 1995 the song 'forced march' was covered by the band between the buried and me in their 2006 album the anatomy of
- the bataan death march (tagalog : martsa ng kamatayan sa bataan, japanese after they reached capas, they were forced to walk the final 9
- the potawatomi trail of death was the forced removal by united states forces from typhoid fever and the stress of the forced march led to
- the sandakan death marches were a series of forced marches in borneo from sandakan to ranau which resulted in the deaths of 2345 allied
- a loaded march is a rapid march over distance carrying weight. training also included some forced marches of 20–30 miles, often followed
- trooper ronald joseph moore (1915–1992) was the leader of 'moore's march', a forced march through the libyan desert by survivors of a long