OnlineHelpWords
divine


Definition for word found.

Find Find, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Found; p. pr. & vb. n. Finding.] [AS. findan; akin to D. vinden, OS. & OHG. findan, G. finden, Dan. finde, icel. & Sw. finna, Goth. fin?an; and perh. to L. petere to seek, Gr. ? to fall, Skr. pat to fall, fly, E. petition.] 1. To meet with, or light upon, accidentally; to gain the first sight or knowledge of, as of something new, or unknown; hence, to fall in with, as a person. Searching the window for a flint, I found This paper, thus sealed up. --Shak. In woods and forests thou art found. --Cowley. 2. To learn by experience or trial; to perceive; to experience; to discover by the intellect or the feelings; to detect; to feel. ``I find you passing gentle.' --Shak. The torrid zone is now found habitable. --Cowley. 3. To come upon by seeking; as, to find something lost. (a) To discover by sounding; as, to find bottom. (b) To discover by study or experiment direct to an object or end; as, water is found to be a compound substance. (c) To gain, as the object of desire or effort; as, to find leisure; to find means. (d) To attain to; to arrive at; to acquire. Seek, and ye shall find. --Matt. vii. 7. Every mountain now hath found a tongue. --Byron. 4. To provide for; to supply; to furnish; as, to find food for workemen; he finds his nephew in money. Wages [pounds]14 and all found. --London Times. Nothing a day and find yourself. --Dickens., Found Found, imp. & p. p. of Find., Found Found, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Founded; p. pr. & vb. n. Founding.] [F. fondre, L. fundere to found, pour.] To form by melting a metal, and pouring it into a mold; to cast. ``Whereof to found their engines.' --Milton., Found Found, n. A thin, single-cut file for combmakers., Found Found, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Founded; p. pr. & vb. n. Founding.] [F. fonder, L. fundare, fr. fundus bottom. See 1st Bottom, and cf. Founder, v. i., Fund.] 1. To lay the basis of; to set, or place, as on something solid, for support; to ground; to establish upon a basis, literal or figurative; to fix firmly. I had else been perfect, Whole as the marble, founded as the rock. --Shak. A man that all his time Hath founded his good fortunes on your love. --Shak. It fell not, for it was founded on a rock. --Matt. vii. 25. 2. To take the ffirst steps or measures in erecting or building up; to furnish the materials for beginning; to begin to raise; to originate; as, to found a college; to found a family. There they shall found Their government, and their great senate choose. --Milton. Syn: To base; ground; institute; establish; fix. See Predicate.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for found.

- found may refer to: found (rossetti), an unfinished oil painting by dante gabriel rossetti. found (band), an experimental pop band from
- many successful companies including dell computers and facebook were founded this way. there are different types of bootstrapping:
- research has found that insects depend on native plants. environmental conditions : an ecosystem consists of interactions of plants, animals,
- found object originates from the french objet trouvé, describing art created from undisguised, but often modified, objects or products
- it is organized under the laws of the state of florida, where it was founded and initially based. it operates several online collaborative
- small yes name euclid , image scuola di atene 07. jpg , caption euclid in raphael 's school of athens , birth_date unknown , death_date
- the terms endemic and indigenous do not imply that an organism necessarily originated or evolved where it is found. native plant
- the letters were found in upper egypt at amarna , the modern name for the egyptian capital of akhetaten (el-amarna), founded by pharaoh
- that the more cost effective saliva testing could eventually replace some blood tests, as saliva contains 20% of the proteins found in blood
- the material that is eaten by foraging animals , forage file:grizzly bear foraging. jpg , grizzly bear (ursus arctos horribilis) mother and


We found definition for found you search from dictionaries , wikipedia mentions for found.

Similar meaning for word found.



Help for word founda.

Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundationer Foun*da"tion*er, n. One who derives support from the funds or foundation of a college or school. [Eng.], Foundationless Foun*da"tion*less, a. Having no foundation., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Exhibit Ex*hib"it, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Exhibited; p. pr. & vb. n. Exhibiting.] [L. exhibitus, p. p. of exhibere to hold forth, to tender, exhibit; ex out + habere to have or hold. See Habit.] 1. To hold forth or present to view; to produce publicly, for inspection; to show, especially in order to attract notice to what is interesting; to display; as, to exhibit commodities in a warehouse, a picture in a gallery. Exhibiting a miserable example of the weakness of mind and body. --Pope. 2. (Law) To submit, as a document, to a court or officer, in course of proceedings; also, to present or offer officially or in legal form; to bring, as a charge. He suffered his attorney-general to exhibit a charge of high treason against the earl. --Clarendon. 3. (Med.) To administer as a remedy; as, to exhibit calomel. To exhibit a foundation or prize, to hold it forth or to tender it as a bounty to candidates. To exibit an essay, to declaim or otherwise present it in public. [Obs.]


Wiki for founda.

- in his review, foundas praised the film for being 'one of the few movies to depict vietnam and its aftermath through the eyes of the
- included as a trailer and entitled 'to be born again' is an interview conducted by scott foundas with morrison explaining some of the
- uk/about-your-local-nhs-foundation-trust/nhs-foundation-trust-directory-and-register-licence-holders/norfolk-and-suffolk-nhs-founda monitor
- scott foundas of the village voice praised outrage for its 'well-honed arguments, sound sourcing, and journalistic boldness and the san
- scott foundas at variety calls the film 'pleasant,' and gives much credit to director pasquin . although foundas refers to the screenplay
- scott foundas with la weekly wrote 'he seeks to transcend the apparent boundaries of any given song; to achieve a total freedom of form;
- and gave it 2.5 stars out of four. variety reviewer scott foundas described the film as 'goofy fantasy hokum' with a message, one scene
- in contrast, foundas is kinder to the film, observing that it is:less a straight matter of addition or subtraction than it is a complex
- critic scott foundas, writing for fipresci believes the film achieved enrique piñeyro's exact goal. he wrote, 'whisky romeo zulu ..
- asymmetry and language dominance: foundas, et al. showed that language function can be localized to one region of the brain, as broca had
-



Help for word foundas.

Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundationer Foun*da"tion*er, n. One who derives support from the funds or foundation of a college or school. [Eng.], Foundationless Foun*da"tion*less, a. Having no foundation., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Exhibit Ex*hib"it, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Exhibited; p. pr. & vb. n. Exhibiting.] [L. exhibitus, p. p. of exhibere to hold forth, to tender, exhibit; ex out + habere to have or hold. See Habit.] 1. To hold forth or present to view; to produce publicly, for inspection; to show, especially in order to attract notice to what is interesting; to display; as, to exhibit commodities in a warehouse, a picture in a gallery. Exhibiting a miserable example of the weakness of mind and body. --Pope. 2. (Law) To submit, as a document, to a court or officer, in course of proceedings; also, to present or offer officially or in legal form; to bring, as a charge. He suffered his attorney-general to exhibit a charge of high treason against the earl. --Clarendon. 3. (Med.) To administer as a remedy; as, to exhibit calomel. To exhibit a foundation or prize, to hold it forth or to tender it as a bounty to candidates. To exibit an essay, to declaim or otherwise present it in public. [Obs.]


Wiki for foundas.

- in his review, foundas praised the film for being 'one of the few movies to depict vietnam and its aftermath through the eyes of the
- included as a trailer and entitled 'to be born again' is an interview conducted by scott foundas with morrison explaining some of the
- uk/about-your-local-nhs-foundation-trust/nhs-foundation-trust-directory-and-register-licence-holders/norfolk-and-suffolk-nhs-founda monitor
- scott foundas at variety calls the film 'pleasant,' and gives much credit to director pasquin . although foundas refers to the screenplay
- scott foundas of the village voice praised outrage for its 'well-honed arguments, sound sourcing, and journalistic boldness and the san
- scott foundas with la weekly wrote 'he seeks to transcend the apparent boundaries of any given song; to achieve a total freedom of form;
- in contrast, foundas is kinder to the film, observing that it is:less a straight matter of addition or subtraction than it is a complex
- critic scott foundas, writing for fipresci believes the film achieved enrique piñeyro's exact goal. he wrote, 'whisky romeo zulu ..
- and gave it 2.5 stars out of four. variety reviewer scott foundas described the film as 'goofy fantasy hokum' with a message, one scene
- as they are psychologically trip-wired la weekly critic scott foundas wrote, 'at a time when most american movies, studio made or '
-



Help for word foundated.

Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundationer Foun*da"tion*er, n. One who derives support from the funds or foundation of a college or school. [Eng.], Foundationless Foun*da"tion*less, a. Having no foundation., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Exhibit Ex*hib"it, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Exhibited; p. pr. & vb. n. Exhibiting.] [L. exhibitus, p. p. of exhibere to hold forth, to tender, exhibit; ex out + habere to have or hold. See Habit.] 1. To hold forth or present to view; to produce publicly, for inspection; to show, especially in order to attract notice to what is interesting; to display; as, to exhibit commodities in a warehouse, a picture in a gallery. Exhibiting a miserable example of the weakness of mind and body. --Pope. 2. (Law) To submit, as a document, to a court or officer, in course of proceedings; also, to present or offer officially or in legal form; to bring, as a charge. He suffered his attorney-general to exhibit a charge of high treason against the earl. --Clarendon. 3. (Med.) To administer as a remedy; as, to exhibit calomel. To exhibit a foundation or prize, to hold it forth or to tender it as a bounty to candidates. To exibit an essay, to declaim or otherwise present it in public. [Obs.]


Wiki for foundated.

- uk/about-your-local-nhs-foundation-trust/nhs-foundation-trust-directory-and-register-licence-holders/guys-and-st-thomas-nhs-foundat monitor
- uk/books/about/natural_language_processing_as_a_foundat. html? id hck59e2nhswc&redir_esc y.
- com/authors-eng/augustus-ferryman-mockler-ferryman/annals-of-sandhurst--a-chronicle-of-the-royal-military-college-from-its-foundat-hci.
- budget , chair john bacon cb , chief_exec sue morris (acting) , employees , cqc rx2 , monitor sussex-partnership-nhs-foundat , website www.
- com/authors-eng/augustus-ferryman-mockler-ferryman/annals-of-sandhurst--a-chronicle-of-the-royal-military-college-from-its-foundat-hci.
- com/authors-eng/augustus-ferryman-mockler-ferryman/annals-of-sandhurst--a-chronicle-of-the-royal-military-college-from-its-foundat-hci.
- com/authors-eng/augustus-ferryman-mockler-ferryman/annals-of-sandhurst--a-chronicle-of-the-royal-military-college-from-its-foundat-hci.
- com/authors-eng/augustus-ferryman-mockler-ferryman/annals-of-sandhurst--a-chronicle-of-the-royal-military-college-from-its-foundat-hci.
- com/authors-eng/augustus-ferryman-mockler-ferryman/annals-of-sandhurst--a-chronicle-of-the-royal-military-college-from-its-foundat-hci.
- com/authors-eng/augustus-ferryman-mockler-ferryman/annals-of-sandhurst--a-chronicle-of-the-royal-military-college-from-its-foundat-hci.



Help for word foundatio.

Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Foundationer Foun*da"tion*er, n. One who derives support from the funds or foundation of a college or school. [Eng.], Foundationless Foun*da"tion*less, a. Having no foundation., Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college., Exhibit Ex*hib"it, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Exhibited; p. pr. & vb. n. Exhibiting.] [L. exhibitus, p. p. of exhibere to hold forth, to tender, exhibit; ex out + habere to have or hold. See Habit.] 1. To hold forth or present to view; to produce publicly, for inspection; to show, especially in order to attract notice to what is interesting; to display; as, to exhibit commodities in a warehouse, a picture in a gallery. Exhibiting a miserable example of the weakness of mind and body. --Pope. 2. (Law) To submit, as a document, to a court or officer, in course of proceedings; also, to present or offer officially or in legal form; to bring, as a charge. He suffered his attorney-general to exhibit a charge of high treason against the earl. --Clarendon. 3. (Med.) To administer as a remedy; as, to exhibit calomel. To exhibit a foundation or prize, to hold it forth or to tender it as a bounty to candidates. To exibit an essay, to declaim or otherwise present it in public. [Obs.]


Wiki for foundatio.

- uk/about-your-local-nhs-foundation-trust/nhs-foundation-trust-directory-and-register-licence-holders/gateshead-health-nhs-foundatio monitor
- she currently serves on the board of the haitian roundtable, the rsq foundatio,n and the grassroots foundation. references : name scott, mona
- the social market foundation (smf) is a british public policy think-tank based in westminster , london . it was set up by supporters of
- the authority of the women in military service for america memorial foundatio to establish a memorial in the district of columbia area; s.
- date july 2011 name our children foundatio , image file:logo ocf blue. png , alt ocf logo alt text type non-profit organisation , founded
- org/about_us/board_of_trustees/lady_gladys_olebile_masire/ , work , publisher sir ketumile masire foundatio , date , accessdate 2012-08-09
- external links : com/9891199 world handicapped foundatio. references : name senturk, metin , alternative names , short description turkish
- references : ssf/2010/11/oregon_rail_heritage_foundatio. html , author ruud, candice , title oregon rail heritage foundation steams up to
- org/standupforgirlsblog/2012/10/2/we-stand-up-for-hope-a-guest-blog-from-the-rukmini-foundatio. html rukmini and litworld. category:non-profit
- references : net/html/swami_satyamitranand_foundatio. html swami_satyamitranand_foundation . http://www. bharatmatamandir. co. in/?page_id 264
-



Help for word foundation.

Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college.


Wiki for foundation.

- foundation commonly refers to: foundation (engineering), the lowest and supporting layer of a structure. foundation (nonprofit), a type of
- a foundation (also a charitable foundation) is a legal categorization of nonprofit organizations that will typically either donate funds
- a foundation is the lowest and supporting layer of a structure . foundations are generally divided into two categories: shallow
- the foundation series is a science fiction series by isaac asimov . there are seven volumes in the foundation series proper, which in its
- originally imported into england in the 17th century and 18th century, and to a larger number of foundation mares of mostly english breeding.
- a very similar type of organization termed a supporting organization operates like a foundation, but they are more complicated to
- in england and wales , a foundation school is a state-funded school in which the governing body has greater freedom in the running of the
- a deep foundation is a type of foundation distinguished from shallow foundations by the depth they are embedded into the ground.
- examples of a non-operating private foundation would be the rockefeller foundation and the bill & melinda gates foundation .
- in/ national foundation for promotion & protection of private education in india. private school statistics. http://www. cesi. edu/ canadian



Help for word Foundation-course.

Foundation Foun*da"tion, n. [F. fondation, L. fundatio. See Found to establish.] 1. The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect. 2. That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis. Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a stone . . . a precious corner stone, a sure foundation. --Is. xxviii. 16. The foundation of a free common wealth. --Motley. 3. (Arch.) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course (see Base course (a), under Base, n.) and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry. 4. A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment. He was entered on the foundation of Westminster. --Macaulay. 5. That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity. Against the canon laws of our foundation. --Milton. Foundation course. See Base course, under Base, n. Foundation muslin, an open-worked gummed fabric used for stiffening dresses, bonnets, etc. Foundation school, in England, an endowed school. To be on a foundation, to be entitled to a support from the proceeds of an endowment, as a scholar or a fellow of a college.


Wiki for Foundation-course.

- a foundation course is a preparatory course for university-level art and design education, used particularly in the united kingdom .
- the foundation degree is a vocational qualification in higher education , courses are typically two years full-time study or 3 to 4
- foundation course to indian civil services is an introductory course designed for the fresh recruits to the various civil services in india
- foundation course for agricultural research services is an introductory course designed for the fresh recruits to the various agricultural
- the awareness course is the education programme of the awareness foundation . the awareness course has been described as '(helping)
- a course in miracles (also referred to as acim or the course) is a self-study the 3rd foundation for inner peace (fip) edition, is
- unsw foundation studies provides foundation courses to assist students in meeting tertiary admission requirements and preparing for
- the european film college is a school that offers an eight-month foundation course in practical filmmaking covering the fields of script-
- baccalaureate diploma programme, english language courses , liberal arts courses, ib teacher training workshops and university foundation course .
- foundation courses: the international study centre (isc) offers foundation courses (pre-degree and pre-masters) for students whose academic