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Definition for word General.

Accountant Ac*count"ant, n. [Cf. F. accomptant, OF. acontant, p. pr.] 1. One who renders account; one accountable. 2. A reckoner. 3. One who is skilled in, keeps, or adjusts, accounts; an officer in a public office, who has charge of the accounts. Accountatn general, the head or superintending accountant in certain public offices. Also, formerly, an officer in the English court of chancery who received the moneys paid into the court, and deposited them in the Bank of England., Adjutant Ad"ju*tant, n. [L. adjutans, p. pr. of adjutare to help. See Aid.] 1. A helper; an assistant. 2. (Mil.) A regimental staff officer, who assists the colonel, or commanding officer of a garrison or regiment, in the details of regimental and garrison duty. Adjutant general (a) (Mil.), the principal staff officer of an army, through whom the commanding general receives communications and issues military orders. In the U. S. army he is brigadier general. (b) (Among the Jesuits), one of a select number of fathers, who resided with the general of the order, each of whom had a province or country assigned to his care. 3. (Zo["o]l.) A species of very large stork (Ciconia argala), a native of India; -- called also the gigantic crane, and by the native name argala. It is noted for its serpent-destroying habits., Attorney-general At*tor"ney-gen"er*al, n.; (pl. Attorney-generals or Attorneys-general). (Law) The chief law officer of the state, empowered to act in all litigation in which the law-executing power is a party, and to advise this supreme executive whenever required. --Wharton., Brigadier general Brig`a*dier" gen"er*al [F. brigadier, fr. brigade.] (Mil.) An officer in rank next above a colonel, and below a major general. He commands a brigade, and is sometimes called, by a shortening of his title, simple a brigadier., Captaincy Cap"tain*cy, n.; pl. Captaincies. The rank, post, or commission of a captain. --Washington. Captaincy general, the office, power, territory, or jurisdiction of a captain general; as, the captaincy general of La Habana (Cuba and its islands)., Commissary Com"mis*sa*ry, n.; pl. Commissaries. [LL. commissarius, fr. L. commissus, p. p. of committere to commit, intrust to. See Commit.] 1. One to whom is committed some charge, duty, or office, by a superior power; a commissioner. Great Destiny, the Commissary of God. --Donne. 2. (Eccl.) An officer of the bishop, who exercises ecclesiastical jurisdiction in parts of the diocese at a distance from the residence of the bishop. --Ayliffe. 3. (Mil.) (a) An officer having charge of a special service; as, the commissary of musters. (b) An officer whose business is to provide food for a body of troops or a military post; -- officially called commissary of subsistence. [U. S.] Washington wrote to the President of Congress . . . urging the appointment of a commissary general, a quartermaster general, a commissary of musters, and a commissary of artillery. --W. Irving Commissary general, an officer in charge of some special department of army service; as: (a) The officer in charge of the commissariat and transport department, or of the ordnance store department. [Eng.] (b) The commissary general of subsistence. [U. S.] Commissary general of subsistence (Mil. U. S.), the head of the subsistence department, who has charge of the purchase and issue of provisions for the army., Commissary Com"mis*sa*ry, n.; pl. Commissaries. [LL. commissarius, fr. L. commissus, p. p. of committere to commit, intrust to. See Commit.] 1. One to whom is committed some charge, duty, or office, by a superior power; a commissioner. Great Destiny, the Commissary of God. --Donne. 2. (Eccl.) An officer of the bishop, who exercises ecclesiastical jurisdiction in parts of the diocese at a distance from the residence of the bishop. --Ayliffe. 3. (Mil.) (a) An officer having charge of a special service; as, the commissary of musters. (b) An officer whose business is to provide food for a body of troops or a military post; -- officially called commissary of subsistence. [U. S.] Washington wrote to the President of Congress . . . urging the appointment of a commissary general, a quartermaster general, a commissary of musters, and a commissary of artillery. --W. Irving Commissary general, an officer in charge of some special department of army service; as: (a) The officer in charge of the commissariat and transport department, or of the ordnance store department. [Eng.] (b) The commissary general of subsistence. [U. S.] Commissary general of subsistence (Mil. U. S.), the head of the subsistence department, who has charge of the purchase and issue of provisions for the army., Gaol Gaol, n. [See Jail.] A place of confinement, especially for minor offenses or provisional imprisonment; a jail. [Preferably, and in the United States usually, written jail.] Commission of general gaol delivery, an authority conferred upon judges and others included in it, for trying and delivering every prisoner in jail when the judges, upon their circuit, arrive at the place for holding court, and for discharging any whom the grand jury fail to indict. [Eng.] Gaol delivery. (Law) See Jail delivery, under Jail., Gross Gross, a. [Compar. Grosser; superl. Grossest.] [F. gros, L. grossus, perh. fr. L. crassus thick, dense, fat, E. crass, cf. Skr. grathita tied together, wound up, hardened. Cf. Engross, Grocer, Grogram.] 1. Great; large; bulky; fat; of huge size; excessively large. ``A gross fat man.' --Shak. A gross body of horse under the Duke. --Milton. 2. Coarse; rough; not fine or delicate. 3. Not easily aroused or excited; not sensitive in perception or feeling; dull; witless. Tell her of things that no gross ear can hear. --Milton. 4. Expressing, Or originating in, animal or sensual appetites; hence, coarse, vulgar, low, obscene, or impure. The terms which are delicate in one age become gross in the next. --Macaulay. 5. Thick; dense; not attenuated; as, a gross medium. 6. Great; palpable; serious; vagrant; shameful; as, a gross mistake; gross injustice; gross negligence. 7. Whole; entire; total; without deduction; as, the gross sum, or gross amount, the gross weight; -- opposed to net. Gross adventure (Law) the loan of money upon bottomry, i. e., on a mortgage of a ship. Gross average (Law), that kind of average which falls upon the gross or entire amount of ship, cargo, and freight; -- commonly called general average. --Bouvier. --Burrill. Gross receipts, the total of the receipts, before they are diminished by any deduction, as for expenses; -- distinguished from net profits. --Abbott. Gross weight the total weight of merchandise or goods, without deduction for tare, tret, or waste; -- distinguished from neat, or net, weight., Homology Ho*mol"o*gy, n. [Gr. ? agreement. See Homologous.] 1. The quality of being homologous; correspondence; relation; as, the homologyof similar polygons. 2. (Biol.) Correspondence or relation in type of structure in contradistinction to similarity of function; as, the relation in structure between the leg and arm of a man; or that between the arm of a man, the fore leg of a horse, the wing of a bird, and the fin of a fish, all these organs being modifications of one type of structure. Note: Homology indicates genetic relationship, and according to Haeckel special homology should be defined in terms of identity of embryonic origin. See Homotypy, and Homogeny. 3. (Chem.) The correspondence or resemblance of substances belonging to the same type or series; a similarity of composition varying by a small, regular difference, and usually attended by a regular variation in physical properties; as, there is an homology between methane, CH4, ethane, C2H6, propane, C3H8, etc., all members of the paraffin series. In an extended sense, the term is applied to the relation between chemical elements of the same group; as, chlorine, bromine, and iodine are said to be in homology with each other. Cf. Heterology. General homology (Biol.), the higher relation which a series of parts, or a single part, bears to the fundamental or general type on which the group is constituted. --Owen. Serial homology (Biol.), representative or repetitive relation in the segments of the same organism, -- as in the lobster, where the parts follow each other in a straight line or series. --Owen. See Homotypy. Special homology (Biol.), the correspondence of a part or organ with those of a different animal, as determined by relative position and connection. --Owen., Officer Of"fi*cer, n. [F. officier. See Office, and cf. Official, n.] 1. One who holds an office; a person lawfully invested with an office, whether civil, military, or ecclesiastical; as, a church officer; a police officer; a staff officer. ``I am an officer of state.' --Shak. 2. (U. S. Mil.) Specifically, a commissioned officer, in distinction from a warrant officer. Field officer, General officer, etc. See under Field, General. etc. Officer of the day (Mil.), the officer who, on a given day, has charge for that day of the quard, prisoners, and police of the post or camp. Officer of the deck, or Officer of the watch (Naut.), the officer temporarily in charge on the deck of a vessel, esp. a war vessel., Practitioner Prac*ti"tion*er, n. [From Practician.] 1. One who is engaged in the actual use or exercise of any art or profession, particularly that of law or medicine. --Crabbe. 2. One who does anything customarily or habitually. 3. A sly or artful person. --Whitgift. General practitioner. See under General, 2., Warrant War"rant, n. [OE. warant, OF. warant a warrant, a defender, protector, F. garant, originally a p. pr. pf German origin, fr. OHG. wer[=e]n to grant, warrant, G. gew["a]hren; akin to OFries. wera. Cf. Guarantee.] 1. That which warrants or authorizes; a commission giving authority, or justifying the doing of anything; an act, instrument, or obligation, by which one person authorizes another to do something which he has not otherwise a right to do; an act or instrument investing one with a right or authority, and thus securing him from loss or damage; commission; authority. Specifically: (a) A writing which authorizes a person to receive money or other thing. (b) (Law) A precept issued by a magistrate authorizing an officer to make an arrest, a seizure, or a search, or do other acts incident to the administration of justice. (c) (Mil. & Nav.) An official certificate of appointment issued to an officer of lower rank than a commissioned officer. See Warrant officer, below. 2. That which vouches or insures for anything; guaranty; security. I give thee warrant of thy place. --Shak. His worth is warrant for his welcome hither. --Shak. 3. That which attests or proves; a voucher. 4. Right; legality; allowance. [Obs.] --Shak. Bench warrant. (Law) See in the Vocabulary. Dock warrant (Com.), a customhouse license or authority. General warrant. (Law) See under General. Land warrant. See under Land. Search warrant. (Law) See under Search, n. Warrant of attorney (Law), written authority given by one person to another empowering him to transact business for him; specifically, written authority given by a client to his attorney to appear for him in court, and to suffer judgment to pass against him by confession in favor of some specified person. --Bouvier. Warrant officer, a noncommissioned officer, as a sergeant, corporal, bandmaster, etc., in the army, or a quartermaster, gunner, boatswain, etc., in the navy. Warrant to sue and defend. (a) (O. Eng. Law) A special warrant from the crown, authorizing a party to appoint an attorney to sue or defend for him. (b) A special authority given by a party to his attorney to commence a suit, or to appear and defend a suit in his behalf. This warrant is now disused. --Burrill., Generalia Gen`e*ra"li*a, n. pl. [Neut. pl., fr. L. generalis.] Generalities; general terms. --J. S. Mill., Generalissimo Gen`er*al*is"si*mo, n. [It., superl. of generale general. See General, a.] The chief commander of an army; especially, the commander in chief of an army consisting of two or more grand divisions under separate commanders; -- a title used in most foreign countries., Generalizable Gen"er*al*i`za*ble, a. Capable of being generalized, or reduced to a general form of statement, or brought under a general rule. Extreme cases are . . . not generalizable. --Coleridge, Generalize Gen"er*al*ize, v. i. To form into a genus; to view objects in their relations to a genus or class; to take general or comprehensive views., Generalized Gen"er*al*ized, a. (Zo["o]l.) Comprising structural characters which are separated in more specialized forms; synthetic; as, a generalized type., Generalizer Gen"er*al*i`zer, n. One who takes general or comprehensive views. --Tyndall., Generally Gen"er*al*ly, adv. 1. In general; commonly; extensively, though not universally; most frequently. 2. In a general way, or in general relation; in the main; upon the whole; comprehensively. Generally speaking, they live very quietly. --Addison. 3. Collectively; as a whole; without omissions. [Obs.] I counsel that all Israel be generally gathered unto thee. --2 Sam. xvii. ll., Generalness Gen"er*al*ness, n. The condition or quality of being general; frequency; commonness. --Sir P. Sidney., Generalship Gen"er*al*ship, n. 1. The office of a general; the exercise of the functions of a general; -- sometimes, with the possessive pronoun, the personality of a general. Your generalship puts me in mind of Prince Eugene. --Goldsmith. 2. Military skill in a general officer or commander. 3. Fig.: Leadership; management. An artful stroke of generalship in Trim to raise a dust. --Sterne., Generalty Gen"er*al*ty, n. Generality. [R.] --Sir M. Hale., Governor general Gov"ern*or gen"er*al A governor who has lieutenant or deputy governors under him; as, the governor general of Canada, of India., Audience Au"di*ence, n. [F. audience, L. audientia, fr. audire to hear. See Audible, a.] 1. The act of hearing; attention to sounds. Thou, therefore, give due audience, and attend. --Milton. 2. Admittance to a hearing; a formal interview, esp. with a sovereign or the head of a government, for conference or the transaction of business. According to the fair play of the world, Let me have audience: I am sent to speak. --Shak. 3. An auditory; an assembly of hearers. Also applied by authors to their readers. Fit audience find, though few. --Milton. He drew his audience upward to the sky. --Dryden. Court of audience, or Audience court (Eng.), a court long since disused, belonging to the Archbishop of Canterbury; also, one belonging to the Archbishop of York. --Mozley & W. In general (or open) audience, publicly. To give audience, to listen; to admit to an interview., Popularly, the title General is given to various general officers, as General, Lieutenant general, Major general, Brigadier general, Commissary general, etc. See Brigadier general, Lieutenant general, Major general, in the Vocabulary. 3. (Mil.) The roll of the drum which calls the troops together; as, to beat the general. 4. (Eccl.) The chief of an order of monks, or of all the houses or congregations under the same rule. 5. The public; the people; the vulgar. [Obs.] --Shak. In general, in the main; for the most part., Inspector In*spect"or, n. [L.: cf. F. inspecteur.] One who inspects, views, or oversees; one to whom the supervision of any work is committed; one who makes an official view or examination, as a military or civil officer; a superintendent; a supervisor; an overseer. Inspector general (Mil.), a staff officer of an army, whose duties are those of inspection, and embrace everything relative to organization, recruiting, discharge, administration, accountability for money and property, instruction, police, and discipline., Judge Judge, n. [OE. juge, OF. & F. juge, fr. OF. jugier, F. juger, to judge. See Judge, v. i.] 1. (Law) A public officer who is invested with authority to hear and determine litigated causes, and to administer justice between parties in courts held for that purpose. The parts of a judge in hearing are four: to direct the evidence; to moderate length, repetition, or impertinency of speech; to recapitulate, select, and collate the material points of that which hath been said; and to give the rule or sentence. --Bacon. 2. One who has skill, knowledge, or experience, sufficient to decide on the merits of a question, or on the quality or value of anything; one who discerns properties or relations with skill and readiness; a connoisseur; an expert; a critic. A man who is no judge of law may be a good judge of poetry, or eloquence, or of the merits of a painting. --Dryden. 3. A person appointed to decide in a?trial of skill, speed, etc., between two or more parties; an umpire; as, a judge in a horse race. 4. (Jewish Hist.) One of supreme magistrates, with both civil and military powers, who governed Israel for more than four hundred years. 5. pl. The title of the seventh book of the Old Testament; the Book of Judges. Judge Advocate (Mil. & Nav.), a person appointed to act as prosecutor at a court-martial; he acts as the representative of the government, as the responsible adviser of the court, and also, to a certain extent, as counsel for the accused, when he has no other counsel. Judge-Advocate General, in the United States, the title of two officers, one attached to the War Department and having the rank of brigadier general, the other attached to the Navy Department and having the rank of colonel of marines or captain in the navy. The first is chief of the Bureau of Military Justice of the army, the other performs a similar duty for the navy. In England, the designation of a member of the ministry who is the legal adviser of the secretary of state for war, and supreme judge of the proceedings of courts-martial. Syn: Judge, Umpire, Arbitrator, Referee. Usage: A judge, in the legal sense, is a magistrate appointed to determine questions of law. An umpire is a person selected to decide between two or more who contend for a prize. An arbitrator is one chosen to allot to two contestants their portion of a claim, usually on grounds of equity and common sense. A referee is one to whom a case is referred for final adjustment. Arbitrations and references are sometimes voluntary, sometimes appointed by a court., Lieutenant Lieu*ten"ant (l[-u]*t[e^]n"ant), n. [F., fr. lieu place + tenant holding, p. pr. of tenir to hold, L. tenere. See Lieu, and Tenant, and cf. Locum Tenens.] 1. An officer who supplies the place of a superior in his absence; a representative of, or substitute for, another in the performance of any duty. The lawful magistrate, who is the vicegerent or lieutenant of God. --Abp. Bramhall. 2. (a) A commissioned officer in the army, next below a captain. (b) A commissioned officer in the British navy, in rank next below a commander. (c) A commissioned officer in the United States navy, in rank next below a lieutenant commander. Note: Lieutenant is often used, either adjectively or in hyphened compounds, to denote an officer, in rank next below another, especially when the duties of the higher officer may devolve upon the lower one; as, lieutenant general, or lieutenant-general; lieutenant colonel, or lieutenant-colonel; lieutenant governor, etc. Deputy lieutenant, the title of any one of the deputies or assistants of the lord lieutenant of a county. [Eng.] Lieutenant colonel, an army officer next in rank above major, and below colonel. Lieutenant commander, an officer in the United States navy, in rank next below a commander and next above a lieutenant. Lieutenant general. See in Vocabulary. Lieutenant governor. (a) An officer of a State, being next in rank to the governor, and, in case of the death or resignation of the latter, himself acting as governor. [U. S.] (b) A deputy governor acting as the chief civil officer of one of several colonies under a governor general. [Eng.], Lieutenant general Lieu*ten"ant gen"er*al (j[e^]n"[~e]r*al). An army officer in rank next below a general and next above a major general. Note: In the United States, before the civil war, this rank had been conferred only on George Washington and (in brevet) on Winfield Scott. In 1864 it was revived by Congress and conferred on Ulysses S. Grant, and subsequently, by promotion, on William T. Sherman and Philip H. Sheridan, each of whom was advanced to the rank of general of the army. When Sheridan was made general (in 1888) the rank of lieutenant general was suffered to lapse. See General.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for General.

- a general officer is an officer of high military ranks , usually in the army, and in some nations, the air force the term is widely used
- général is the french word for general . there are two main categories of generals : the general officers (officiers généraux), which are
- brigadier general is a senior rank in the armed forces . it is the lowest ranking general officer in some countries, usually sitting
- the general officer s of the confederate states army (csa) were the senior military leaders of the confederacy during the american civil
- in the united states army , united states air force , and united states marine corps , general is a four-star general officer rank, with
- major general or major-general is a military rank used in many countries. it is derived from the older rank of sergeant major general .
- lieutenant general is a military rank used in many countries. ages where the title of lieutenant general was held by the second in command
- general (or full general to distinguish it from the lower general officer ranks) is the highest rank currently achievable by professional
- general relativity, or the general theory of relativity, is the geometric theory of gravitation published by albert einstein in 1916
- general motors company llc, commonly known as gm, is an american multinational holding corporation headquartered in detroit, michigan
-


We found definition for General you search from dictionaries , wikipedia mentions for General.

Similar meaning for word General.



Help for word general-average.

Gross Gross, a. [Compar. Grosser; superl. Grossest.] [F. gros, L. grossus, perh. fr. L. crassus thick, dense, fat, E. crass, cf. Skr. grathita tied together, wound up, hardened. Cf. Engross, Grocer, Grogram.] 1. Great; large; bulky; fat; of huge size; excessively large. ``A gross fat man.' --Shak. A gross body of horse under the Duke. --Milton. 2. Coarse; rough; not fine or delicate. 3. Not easily aroused or excited; not sensitive in perception or feeling; dull; witless. Tell her of things that no gross ear can hear. --Milton. 4. Expressing, Or originating in, animal or sensual appetites; hence, coarse, vulgar, low, obscene, or impure. The terms which are delicate in one age become gross in the next. --Macaulay. 5. Thick; dense; not attenuated; as, a gross medium. 6. Great; palpable; serious; vagrant; shameful; as, a gross mistake; gross injustice; gross negligence. 7. Whole; entire; total; without deduction; as, the gross sum, or gross amount, the gross weight; -- opposed to net. Gross adventure (Law) the loan of money upon bottomry, i. e., on a mortgage of a ship. Gross average (Law), that kind of average which falls upon the gross or entire amount of ship, cargo, and freight; -- commonly called general average. --Bouvier. --Burrill. Gross receipts, the total of the receipts, before they are diminished by any deduction, as for expenses; -- distinguished from net profits. --Abbott. Gross weight the total weight of merchandise or goods, without deduction for tare, tret, or waste; -- distinguished from neat, or net, weight.


Wiki for general-average.

- the law of general average is a legal principle of maritime law according to which all parties in a sea venture proportionally share any
- the general weighted average is a representation (often numerical) of the overall scholastic standing of students used for evaluation.
- in colloquial language average usually refers to the sum of a list of numbers or general average , where the owner can claim a
- an average adjuster is a marine claims specialist responsible for adjusting and providing the general average statement. an average
- the missouri senate is the upper chamber of the missouri general assembly . it has 34 members, representing districts with an average
- in mechanics , the virial theorem provides a general equation that relates the average over time of the total kinetic energy , \left\langle
- for elementary and high school levels, the more number of periods in a week the subject has, the greater its part in the general average
- general average contributions, or tithe rent-charge), or the incidence of a duty (e.g. obligations as to the maintenance of highways).
- the krylov–bogolyubov averaging method (krylov–bogolyubov method of averaging) is a that they developed a general averaging approach and
- research fellow at the university of oslo from 1953 to 1959, took the dr.juris degree in 1958 on the thesis the survival of general average.



Help for word General-homology.

Homology Ho*mol"o*gy, n. [Gr. ? agreement. See Homologous.] 1. The quality of being homologous; correspondence; relation; as, the homologyof similar polygons. 2. (Biol.) Correspondence or relation in type of structure in contradistinction to similarity of function; as, the relation in structure between the leg and arm of a man; or that between the arm of a man, the fore leg of a horse, the wing of a bird, and the fin of a fish, all these organs being modifications of one type of structure. Note: Homology indicates genetic relationship, and according to Haeckel special homology should be defined in terms of identity of embryonic origin. See Homotypy, and Homogeny. 3. (Chem.) The correspondence or resemblance of substances belonging to the same type or series; a similarity of composition varying by a small, regular difference, and usually attended by a regular variation in physical properties; as, there is an homology between methane, CH4, ethane, C2H6, propane, C3H8, etc., all members of the paraffin series. In an extended sense, the term is applied to the relation between chemical elements of the same group; as, chlorine, bromine, and iodine are said to be in homology with each other. Cf. Heterology. General homology (Biol.), the higher relation which a series of parts, or a single part, bears to the fundamental or general type on which the group is constituted. --Owen. Serial homology (Biol.), representative or repetitive relation in the segments of the same organism, -- as in the lobster, where the parts follow each other in a straight line or series. --Owen. See Homotypy. Special homology (Biol.), the correspondence of a part or organ with those of a different animal, as determined by relative position and connection. --Owen.


Wiki for General-homology.

- in mathematics , specifically in homology theory and algebraic topology , cohomology is a general term for a sequence of abelian group s
- homological algebra is the branch of mathematics that studies homology in a general algebraic setting. it is a relatively young
- homology (in part from greek ὁμός homos 'identical') is a certain general procedure to associate a sequence of abelian group s or
- homology in algebraic topology and abstract algebra , homology (in part from greek ὁμός homos 'identical') is a certain general procedure
- coefficient theorems establish relationships between homology and cohomology theories. simplicial homology or more general singular
- in mathematics , particularly algebraic topology and homology theory , the mayer– in general, the sequence holds for those theories
- of cys residues) and do not show general homology; in spite of this, homology is found inside some taxonomic groups (such as vertebrate mts).
- ridicule on the whole inquiry into those higher relations of parts to the archetype which sir richard owen (1804–1892) called 'general homologies.'
- the rules for development of special characteristics which differ significantly from general homology were listed by karl ernst von baer
- a statement relating the homology of two objects to the homology of their product. in general one uses singular homology; but if x and y



Help for word General-officer.

Officer Of"fi*cer, n. [F. officier. See Office, and cf. Official, n.] 1. One who holds an office; a person lawfully invested with an office, whether civil, military, or ecclesiastical; as, a church officer; a police officer; a staff officer. ``I am an officer of state.' --Shak. 2. (U. S. Mil.) Specifically, a commissioned officer, in distinction from a warrant officer. Field officer, General officer, etc. See under Field, General. etc. Officer of the day (Mil.), the officer who, on a given day, has charge for that day of the quard, prisoners, and police of the post or camp. Officer of the deck, or Officer of the watch (Naut.), the officer temporarily in charge on the deck of a vessel, esp. a war vessel.


Wiki for General-officer.

- a general officer is an officer of high military ranks , usually in the army, and in some nations, the air force the term is widely used
- the general officer s of the confederate states army (csa) were the senior military leaders of the confederacy during the american civil
- an officer is a member of an armed force or uniformed service who holds a domiciles, and general recreation facilities (officer clubs
- in the united states army , united states air force , and united states marine corps , general is a four-star general officer rank, with
- general (ɡenəˈʁaːl) is the highest rank of the german army and german air force . in which the officer served, and (nominally) commanded
- a four-star rank is the rank of any four-star officer described by the nato of-9 (full) admiral , (full) general , or (in the case of air
- a general officer is an officer of high military rank ; in the uniformed services of the united states , general officers are
- these individuals are not general authorities of the church, but are referred to as 'general auxiliary officers' or 'general officers' of
- general officer commanding (goc) is the usual title given in the armies of commonwealth (and some other) nations to a general officer who
- general officer commanding, ceylon (also known as commander of troops ) was the designation of the general officer appointed to command all
-



Help for word General-practitioner.

Practitioner Prac*ti"tion*er, n. [From Practician.] 1. One who is engaged in the actual use or exercise of any art or profession, particularly that of law or medicine. --Crabbe. 2. One who does anything customarily or habitually. 3. A sly or artful person. --Whitgift. General practitioner. See under General, 2.


Wiki for General-practitioner.



Help for word General-warrant.

Warrant War"rant, n. [OE. warant, OF. warant a warrant, a defender, protector, F. garant, originally a p. pr. pf German origin, fr. OHG. wer[=e]n to grant, warrant, G. gew["a]hren; akin to OFries. wera. Cf. Guarantee.] 1. That which warrants or authorizes; a commission giving authority, or justifying the doing of anything; an act, instrument, or obligation, by which one person authorizes another to do something which he has not otherwise a right to do; an act or instrument investing one with a right or authority, and thus securing him from loss or damage; commission; authority. Specifically: (a) A writing which authorizes a person to receive money or other thing. (b) (Law) A precept issued by a magistrate authorizing an officer to make an arrest, a seizure, or a search, or do other acts incident to the administration of justice. (c) (Mil. & Nav.) An official certificate of appointment issued to an officer of lower rank than a commissioned officer. See Warrant officer, below. 2. That which vouches or insures for anything; guaranty; security. I give thee warrant of thy place. --Shak. His worth is warrant for his welcome hither. --Shak. 3. That which attests or proves; a voucher. 4. Right; legality; allowance. [Obs.] --Shak. Bench warrant. (Law) See in the Vocabulary. Dock warrant (Com.), a customhouse license or authority. General warrant. (Law) See under General. Land warrant. See under Land. Search warrant. (Law) See under Search, n. Warrant of attorney (Law), written authority given by one person to another empowering him to transact business for him; specifically, written authority given by a client to his attorney to appear for him in court, and to suffer judgment to pass against him by confession in favor of some specified person. --Bouvier. Warrant officer, a noncommissioned officer, as a sergeant, corporal, bandmaster, etc., in the army, or a quartermaster, gunner, boatswain, etc., in the navy. Warrant to sue and defend. (a) (O. Eng. Law) A special warrant from the crown, authorizing a party to appoint an attorney to sue or defend for him. (b) A special authority given by a party to his attorney to commence a suit, or to appear and defend a suit in his behalf. This warrant is now disused. --Burrill.


Wiki for General-warrant.

- in general, customs writs of assistance served as general search warrant s that did not expire, allowing customs officials to search
- a governor general's warrant is a document authorizing canada 's president of the treasury board to spend money appropriated by parliament
- most often, the term warrant refers to a specific type of authorization ; a writ government had used a 'general warrant' to enforce its laws.
- requires any warrant to be judicially sanctioned and supported by probable cause . a type of general search warrant issued by the
- he initially supported the government, but in february 1764 he voted with the opposition over the use of general warrants in the wilkes
- the king felt personally insulted and ordered general warrant s to be issued for the arrest of wilkes and the publishers on 30 april 1763.
- warrant may refer to: warrant (law), a form of specific governor general's warrant , a non-budgeted payment instrument in canadian law
- attorney-general of new zealand michael cullen overrules an arrest warrant issued by a district court judge against former israeli
- in financial transactions, a warrant is a written order from a first person that in canada: governor general's warrant. see also
- for the issuance of search warrants when articles of expression, namely, the court found the warrant issued was a general warrant ,



Help for word generale.

Outgeneral Out*gen"er*al, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Outgeneraledor Outgeneralled; p. pr. & vb. n. Outgeneraling or Outgeneralling.] To exceed in generalship; to gain advantage over by superior military skill or executive ability; to outmaneuver. --Chesterfield.


Wiki for generale.

- army generals' insignia: svg , generale (italian army )file:general-arm. png , генерал(army of the republic of macedonia )file:gral sedena.
- compagnie générale des eaux (cge) was a french multinational company which gave birth to three world's leaders in their respective fields:
- generale di corpo d'armata(tenente generale)corps general (lieutenant general )generale di divisione(maggior generale)divisional general
- société générale s.a. (socgen) is a french multinational bank ing and financial service s company headquartered in paris. the company is a
- the ferme générale (fɛʁm ʒeneʁal) was, in ancien régime france , essentially an outsource d customs and excise operation which collected
- studium generale is the old customary name for a medieval university . definition : official definition of what constituted a studium generale.
- the compagnie générale transatlantique (shortened to 'cie. gle. transatlantique', or cgt, and commonly named 'transat'), typically known
- the direction générale de l’armement (dga), which can be translated with “general directorate for armament”, is the french government
- the société générale de belgique (generale maatschappij) (sgb) was one of the largest companies that ever existed in belgium .
- société générale twin towers are two office skyscraper s located in la défense , a high-rise business district , and in nanterre , france