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Definition for word great.

Gross Gross, n. [F. gros (in sense 1), grosse (in sense 2). See Gross, a.] 1. The main body; the chief part, bulk, or mass. ``The gross of the enemy.' --Addison. For the gross of the people, they are considered as a mere herd of cattle. --Burke. 2. sing. & pl. The number of twelve dozen; twelve times twelve; as, a gross of bottles; ten gross of pens. Advowson in gross (Law), an advowson belonging to a person, and not to a manor. A great gross, twelve gross; one hundred and forty-four dozen. By the gross, by the quantity; at wholesale. Common in gross. (Law) See under Common, n. In the gross, In gross, in the bulk, or the undivided whole; all parts taken together., 4. Not prolonged in duration; not extended in time; short; as, after a small space. --Shak. 5. Weak; slender; fine; gentle; soft; not loud. ``A still, small voice.' --1 Kings xix. 12. Great and small,of all ranks or degrees; -- used especially of persons. ``His quests, great and small.' --Chaucer. Small arms, muskets, rifles, pistols, etc., in distinction from cannon. Small beer. See under Beer. Small coal. (a) Little coals of wood formerly used to light fires. --Gay. (b) Coal about the size of a hazelnut, separated from the coarser parts by screening. Small craft (Naut.), a vessel, or vessels in general, of a small size. Small fruits. See under Fruit. Small hand, a certain size of paper. See under Paper. Small hours. See under Hour. Small letter. (Print.), a lower-case letter. See Lower-case, and Capital letter, under Capital, a. Small piece, a Scotch coin worth about 21/4d. sterling, or about 41/2cents. Small register. See the Note under 1st Register, 7. Small stuff (Naut.), spun yarn, marline, and the smallest kinds of rope. --R. H. Dana, Jr. Small talk, light or trifling conversation; chitchat. Small wares (Com.), various small textile articles, as tapes, braid, tringe, and the like. --M`Culloch., Burnet Bur"net, n. [OE. burnet burnet; also, brownish (the plant perh. being named from its color), fr. F. brunet, dim. of brun brown; cf. OF. brunete a sort of flower. See Brunette.] (Bot.) A genus of perennial herbs (Poterium); especially, P.Sanguisorba, the common, or garden, burnet. Burnet moth (Zo["o]l.), in England, a handsome moth (Zyg[ae]na filipendula), with crimson spots on the wings. Burnet saxifrage. (Bot.) See Saxifrage. Canadian burnet, a marsh plant (Poterium Canadensis). Great burnet, Wild burnet, Poterium (or Sanguisorba) oficinalis., Cassino Cas*si"no, n. [It. casino a small house, a gaming house. See casino.] A game at cards, played by two or more persons, usually for twenty-one points. Great cassino, the ten of diamonds. Little cassino, the two of spades., Climacteric Cli*mac"ter*ic, n. 1. A period in human life in which some great change is supposed to take place in the constitution. The critical periods are thought by some to be the years produced by multiplying 7 into the odd numbers 3, 5, 7, and 9; to which others add the 81st year. 2. Any critical period. It is your lot, as it was mine, to live during one of the grand climacterics of the world. --Southey. Grand or Great climacteric, the sixty-third year of human life. I should hardly yield my rigid fibers to be regenerated by them; nor begin, in my grand climacteric, to squall in their new accents, or to stammer, in my second cradle, the elemental sounds of their barbarous metaphysics. --Burke., Dane Dane, n. [LL. Dani: cf. AS. Dene.] A native, or a naturalized inhabitant, of Denmark. Great Dane. (Zo["o]l.) See Danish dog, under Danish., Danish Dan"ish, a. [See Dane.] Belonging to the Danes, or to their language or country. -- n. The language of the Danes. Danish dog (Zo["o]l.), one of a large and powerful breed of dogs reared in Denmark; -- called also great Dane. See Illustration in Appendix., Bird of paradise Bird" of par"a*dise (Zo["o]l.) The name of several very beautiful birds of the genus Paradisea and allied genera, inhabiting New Guinea and the adjacent islands. The males have brilliant colors, elegant plumes, and often remarkable tail feathers. Note: The Great emerald (Paradisea apoda) and the Lesser emerald (P. minor) furnish many of the plumes used as ornaments by ladies; the Red is P. rubra or sanguinea; the Golden is Parotia aurea or sexsetacea; the King is Cincinnurus regius. The name is also applied to the longer-billed birds of another related group (Epimachin[ae]) from the same region. The Twelve-wired (Seleucides alba) is one of these. See Paradise bird, and Note under Apod., Purslane Purs"lane, n. [OF. porcelaine, pourcelaine (cf. It. porcellana), corrupted fr. L. porcilaca for portulaca.] (Bot.) An annual plant (Portulaca oleracea), with fleshy, succulent, obovate leaves, sometimes used as a pot herb and for salads, garnishing, and pickling. Flowering purslane, or Great flowered purslane, the Portulaca grandiflora. See Portulaca. Purslane tree, a South African shrub (Portulacaria Afra) with many small opposite fleshy obovate leaves. Sea purslane, a seashore plant (Arenaria peploides) with crowded opposite fleshy leaves. Water purslane, an aquatic plant (Ludwiqia palustris) but slightly resembling purslane., Go Go, n. 1. Act; working; operation. [Obs.] So gracious were the goes of marriage. --Marston. 2. A circumstance or occurrence; an incident. [Slang] This is a pretty go. --Dickens. 3. The fashion or mode; as, quite the go. [Colloq.] 4. Noisy merriment; as, a high go. [Colloq.] 5. A glass of spirits. [Slang] 6. Power of going or doing; energy; vitality; perseverance; push; as, there is no go in him. [Colloq.] 7. (Cribbage) That condition in the course of the game when a player can not lay down a card which will not carry the aggregate count above thirty-one. Great go, Little go, the final and the preliminary examinations for a degree. [Slang, Eng. Univ.] No go, a failure; a fiasco. [Slang] --Thackeray. On the go, moving about; unsettled. [Colloq.], Widgeon Widg"eon, n. [Probably from an old French form of F. vigeon, vingeon, gingeon; of uncertain origin; cf. L. vipio, -onis, a kind of small crane.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of fresh-water ducks, especially those belonging to the subgenus Mareca, of the genus Anas. The common European widgeon (Anas penelope) and the American widgeon (A. Americana) are the most important species. The latter is called also baldhead, baldpate, baldface, baldcrown, smoking duck, wheat, duck, and whitebelly. Bald-faced, or Green-headed, widgeon, the American widgeon. Black widgeon, the European tufted duck. Gray widgeon. (a) The gadwall. (b) The pintail duck. Great headed widgeon, the poachard. Pied widgeon. (a) The poachard. (b) The goosander. Saw-billed widgeon, the merganser. Sea widgeon. See in the Vocabulary. Spear widgeon, the goosander. [Prov. Eng.] Spoonbilled widgeon, the shoveler. White widgeon, the smew. Wood widgeon, the wood duck., Horned Horned, a. Furnished with a horn or horns; furnished with a hornlike process or appendage; as, horned cattle; having some part shaped like a horn. The horned moon with one bright star Within the nether tip. --Coleridge. Horned bee (Zo["o]l.), a British wild bee (Osmia bicornis), having two little horns on the head. Horned dace (Zo["o]l.), an American cyprinoid fish (Semotilus corporialis) common in brooks and ponds; the common chub. See Illust. of Chub. Horned frog (Zo["o]l.), a very large Brazilian frog (Ceratophrys cornuta), having a pair of triangular horns arising from the eyelids. Horned grebe (Zo["o]l.), a species of grebe (Colymbus auritus), of Arctic Europe and America, having two dense tufts of feathers on the head. Horned horse (Zo["o]l.), the gnu. Horned lark (Zo["o]l.), the shore lark. Horned lizard (Zo["o]l.), the horned toad. Horned owl (Zo["o]l.), a large North American owl (Bubo Virginianus), having a pair of elongated tufts of feathers on the head. Several distinct varieties are known; as, the Arctic, Western, dusky, and striped horned owls, differing in color, and inhabiting different regions; -- called also great horned owl, horn owl, eagle owl, and cat owl. Sometimes also applied to the long-eared owl. See Eared owl, under Eared. Horned poppy. (Bot.) See Horn poppy, under Horn. Horned pout (Zo["o]l.), an American fresh-water siluroid fish; the bullpout. Horned rattler (Zo["o]l.), a species of rattlesnake (Crotalus cerastes), inhabiting the dry, sandy plains, from California to Mexico. It has a pair of triangular horns between the eyes; -- called also sidewinder. Horned ray (Zo["o]l.), the sea devil. Horned screamer (Zo["o]l.), the kamichi. Horned snake (Zo["o]l.), the cerastes. Horned toad (Zo["o]l.), any lizard of the genus Phrynosoma, of which nine or ten species are known. These lizards have several hornlike spines on the head, and a broad, flat body, covered with spiny scales. They inhabit the dry, sandy plains from California to Mexico and Texas. Called also horned lizard. Horned viper. (Zo["o]l.) See Cerastes., Morel Mor"el, n. [See Morelle.] (Bot.) 1. Nightshade; -- so called from its blackish purple berries. [Written also morelle.] 2. A kind of cherry. See Morello. Great morel, the deadly nightshade. Petty morel, the black nightshade. See Nightshade., Organ Or"gan, n. [L. organum, Gr. ?; akin to ? work, and E. work: cf. F. organe. See Work, and cf. Orgue, Orgy.] 1. An instrument or medium by which some important action is performed, or an important end accomplished; as, legislatures, courts, armies, taxgatherers, etc., are organs of government. 2. (Biol.) A natural part or structure in an animal or a plant, capable of performing some special action (termed its function), which is essential to the life or well-being of the whole; as, the heart, lungs, etc., are organs of animals; the root, stem, foliage, etc., are organs of plants. Note: In animals the organs are generally made up of several tissues, one of which usually predominates, and determines the principal function of the organ. Groups of organs constitute a system. See System. 3. A component part performing an essential office in the working of any complex machine; as, the cylinder, valves, crank, etc., are organs of the steam engine. 4. A medium of communication between one person or body and another; as, the secretary of state is the organ of communication between the government and a foreign power; a newspaper is the organ of its editor, or of a party, sect, etc. 5. [Cf. AS. organ, fr. L. organum.] (Mus.) A wind instrument containing numerous pipes of various dimensions and kinds, which are filled with wind from a bellows, and played upon by means of keys similar to those of a piano, and sometimes by foot keys or pedals; -- formerly used in the plural, each pipe being considired an organ. The deep, majestic, solemn organs blow. --Pope. Note: Chaucer used the form orgon as a plural. The merry orgon . . . that in the church goon [go]. Barrel organ, Choir organ, Great organ, etc. See under Barrel, Choir, etc. Cabinet organ (Mus.), an organ of small size, as for a chapel or for domestic use; a reed organ. Organ bird (Zo["o]l.), a Tasmanian crow shrike (Gymnorhina organicum). It utters discordant notes like those of a hand organ out of tune. Organ fish (Zo["o]l.), the drumfish. Organ gun. (Mil.) Same as Orgue (b) . Organ harmonium (Mus.), an harmonium of large capacity and power. Organ of Gorti (Anat.), a complicated structure in the cochlea of the ear, including the auditory hair cells, the rods or fibers of Corti, the membrane of Corti, etc. See Note under Ear. Organ pipe. See Pipe, n., 1. Organ-pipe coral. (Zo["o]l.) See Tubipora. Organ point (Mus.), a passage in which the tonic or dominant is sustained continuously by one part, while the other parts move., Pastern Pas"tern, n. [Of. pasturon, F. p[^a]turon, fr. OF. pasture a tether, for beasts while pasturing; prop., a pasturing. See Pasture.] 1. The part of the foot of the horse, and allied animals, between the fetlock and the coffin joint. See Illust. of Horse. Note: The upper bone, or phalanx, of the foot is called the great pastern bone; the second, the small pastern bone; and the third, in the hoof, the coffin bone. Pastern joint, the joint in the hoof of the horse, and allied animals, between the great and small pastern bones. 2. A shackle for horses while pasturing. --Knight. 3. A patten. [Obs.] --Dryden., Primer Prim"er, n. [Originally, the book read at prime, the first canonical hour. LL. primae liber. See Prime, n., 4.] 1. Originally, a small prayer book for church service, containing the little office of the Virgin Mary; also, a work of elementary religious instruction. The primer, or office of the Blessed Virgin. --Bp. Stillingfleet. 2. A small elementary book for teaching children to read; a reading or spelling book for a beginner. As he sat in the school at his prymer. --Chaucer. 3. (Print.) A kind of type, of which there are two species; one, called long primer, intermediate in size between bourgeois and small pica [see Long primer]; the other, called great primer, larger than pica. Note: Great primer type., Ragweed Rag"weed, n. (Bot.) A common American composite weed (Ambrosia artemisi[ae]folia) with finely divided leaves; hogweed. Great ragweed, a coarse American herb (Ambrosia trifida), with rough three-lobed opposite leaves., Greek schism (Eccl.), the separation of the Greek and Roman churches. Great schism, or Western schism (Eccl.) a schism in the Roman church in the latter part of the 14th century, on account of rival claimants to the papal throne. Schism act (Law), an act of the English Parliament requiring all teachers to conform to the Established Church, -- passed in 1714, repealed in 1719., Seal Seal, n. [OE. seel, OF. seel, F. sceau, fr. L. sigillum a little figure or image, a seal, dim. of signum a mark, sign, figure, or image. See Sign, n., and cf. Sigil.] 1. An engraved or inscribed stamp, used for marking an impression in wax or other soft substance, to be attached to a document, or otherwise used by way of authentication or security. 2. Wax, wafer, or other tenacious substance, set to an instrument, and impressed or stamped with a seal; as, to give a deed under hand and seal. Till thou canst rail the seal from off my bond Thou but offend;st thy lungs to speak so loud. --Shak. 3. That which seals or fastens; esp., the wax or wafer placed on a letter or other closed paper, etc., to fasten it. 4. That which confirms, ratifies, or makes stable; that which authenticates; that which secures; assurance. ``under the seal of silence.' --Milton. Like a red seal is the setting sun On the good and the evil men have done. --Lonfellow. 5. An arrangement for preventing the entrance or return of gas or air into a pipe, by which the open end of the pipe dips beneath the surface of water or other liquid, or a deep bend or sag in the pipe is filled with the liquid; a draintrap. Great seal. See under Great. Privy seal. See under Privy, a. Seal lock, a lock in which the keyhole is covered by a seal in such a way that the lock can not be opened without rupturing the seal. Seal manual. See under Manual, a. Seal ring, a ring having a seal engraved on it, or ornamented with a device resembling a seal; a signet ring. --Shak., Ghost Ghost, n. [OE. gast, gost, soul, spirit, AS. g[=a]st breath, spirit, soul; akin to OS. g?st spirit, soul, D. geest, G. geist, and prob. to E. gaze, ghastly.] 1. The spirit; the soul of man. [Obs.] Then gives her grieved ghost thus to lament. --Spenser. 2. The disembodied soul; the soul or spirit of a deceased person; a spirit appearing after death; an apparition; a specter. The mighty ghosts of our great Harrys rose. --Shak. I thought that I had died in sleep, And was a blessed ghost. --Coleridge. 3. Any faint shadowy semblance; an unsubstantial image; a phantom; a glimmering; as, not a ghost of a chance; the ghost of an idea. Each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor. --Poe. 4. A false image formed in a telescope by reflection from the surfaces of one or more lenses. Ghost moth (Zo["o]l.), a large European moth (Hepialus humuli); so called from the white color of the male, and the peculiar hovering flight; -- called also great swift. Holy Ghost, the Holy Spirit; the Paraclete; the Comforter; (Theol.) the third person in the Trinity. To give up or yield up the ghost, to die; to expire. And he gave up the ghost full softly. --Chaucer. Jacob . . . yielded up the ghost, and was gathered unto his people. --Gen. xlix. 33., Synagogue Syn"a*gogue, n. [F., from L. synagoga, Gr. ? a bringing together, an assembly, a synagogue, fr. ? to bring together; sy`n with + ? to lead. See Syn-, and Agent.] 1. A congregation or assembly of Jews met for the purpose of worship, or the performance of religious rites. 2. The building or place appropriated to the religious worship of the Jews. 3. The council of, probably, 120 members among the Jews, first appointed after the return from the Babylonish captivity; -- called also the Great Synagogue, and sometimes, though erroneously, the Sanhedrin. 4. A congregation in the early Christian church. My brethren, . . . if there come into your synagogue a man with a gold ring. --James ii. 1,2 (Rev. Ver.). 5. Any assembly of men. [Obs. or R.] --Milton., Great tithes. See under Tithes. The great, the eminent, distinguished, or powerful. The Great Spirit, among the North American Indians, their chief or principal deity. To be great (with one), to be intimate or familiar (with him). --Bacon., Trek Trek, n. [Written also treck.] [D. Cf. Track, n.] The act of trekking; a drawing or a traveling; a journey; a migration. [Chiefly South Africa] To the north a trek was projected, and some years later was nearly carried out, for the occupation of the Mashonaland. --James Bryce. Great Trek, the great emigration of Boers from Cape Colony which began in 1836, and resulted in the founding of the South African Republic and Orange Free State., Trochanter Tro*chan"ter, n. [NL., fr. Gr. ?.] 1. (Anat.) One of two processes near the head of the femur, the outer being called the great trochanter, and the inner the small trochanter. 2. (Zo["o]l.) The third joint of the leg of an insect, or the second when the trochantine is united with the coxa., Wallaroo Wal`la*roo", n. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of kangaroos of the genus Macropus, especially M. robustus, sometimes called the great wallaroo., Wanderoo Wan`der*oo", n. [Cingalese wanderu a monkey.] (Zo["o]l.) A large monkey (Macacus silenus) native of Malabar. It is black, or nearly so, but has a long white or gray beard encircling the face. Called also maha, silenus, neelbhunder, lion-tailed baboon, and great wanderoo. [Written also ouanderoo.] Note: The name is sometimes applied also to other allied species., Water crowfoot Wa"ter crow"foot` (Bot.) An aquatic kind of buttercup (Ranunculus aquatilis), used as food for cattle in parts of England. Great water crowfoot, an American water plant (Ranunculus multifidus), having deep yellow flowers., Whaap Whaap, n. [So called from one of its notes.] (Zo["o]l.) (a) The European curlew; -- called also awp, whaup, great whaup, and stock whaup. (b) The whimbrel; -- called also May whaup, little whaup, and tang whaup. [Prov. Eng. & Scot.], Great White Way Great White Way Broadway, in New York City, in the neighborhood chiefly occupied by theaters, as from about 30th Street about 50th Street; -- so called from its brilliant illumination at night., Rosebay Rose"bay`, n. (Bot.) (a) the oleander. [Obs.] (b) Any shrub of the genus Rhododendron. [U.S.] (c) An herb (Epilobium spicatum) with showy purple flowers, common in Europe and North America; -- called also great willow herb.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for great.

- every sexually-reproducing creature who is not a genetic chimera has a maximum of four gene tic grandparents, eight genetic great-
- great may refer to: greatness , being superior, majestic, transcendent, or divine. great , graph rewriting and transformation, a model
- gang resistance education and training, abbreviated g.r.e.a.t., provides a school-based, police officer instructed program that includes
- graph rewriting and transformation (great) is a model transformation language (mtl) for model integrated computing available in the gme
- a great power is a state that is recognized as having the ability to exert its influence on a global scale. great powers
- the great egret (ardea alba) also known as common egret, large egret or great white heron is a large, widely distributed egret .
- last wallace , first david , work the guardian , title letters: our education system's great shame , url http://www. guardian.
- the great basin is the largest area of wiktionary:contiguous , contiguous endorheic watersheds in north america . it is noted for both
- the great blue heron (ardea herodias) is a large wading bird in the heron family ardeidae , common near the shores of open water and in
- great cormorant (phalacrocorax carbo), known as the great black cormorant across the northern hemisphere, the black cormorant in australia
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We found definition for great you search from dictionaries , wikipedia mentions for great.

Similar meaning for word great.



Help for word Great-and-small.

4. Not prolonged in duration; not extended in time; short; as, after a small space. --Shak. 5. Weak; slender; fine; gentle; soft; not loud. ``A still, small voice.' --1 Kings xix. 12. Great and small,of all ranks or degrees; -- used especially of persons. ``His quests, great and small.' --Chaucer. Small arms, muskets, rifles, pistols, etc., in distinction from cannon. Small beer. See under Beer. Small coal. (a) Little coals of wood formerly used to light fires. --Gay. (b) Coal about the size of a hazelnut, separated from the coarser parts by screening. Small craft (Naut.), a vessel, or vessels in general, of a small size. Small fruits. See under Fruit. Small hand, a certain size of paper. See under Paper. Small hours. See under Hour. Small letter. (Print.), a lower-case letter. See Lower-case, and Capital letter, under Capital, a. Small piece, a Scotch coin worth about 21/4d. sterling, or about 41/2cents. Small register. See the Note under 1st Register, 7. Small stuff (Naut.), spun yarn, marline, and the smallest kinds of rope. --R. H. Dana, Jr. Small talk, light or trifling conversation; chitchat. Small wares (Com.), various small textile articles, as tapes, braid, tringe, and the like. --M`Culloch.


Wiki for Great-and-small.

- all creatures great and small may refer to: all creatures great and small, a book by james herriot , comprising his first two novels
- of matters great and small is a collection of seventeen scientific essay s by isaac asimov . the magazine of fantasy and science fiction ,
- all creatures great and small is a british television series, based on the books of the british veterinary surgeon alf wight, who wrote
- all creatures great and small is a 1975 television film, directed by claude whatham , based on the book all creatures great and small, by
- this is a list of television episodes from the british television series all creatures great and small . dates shown are original air
- this is a list of characters featured in the british television series all creatures great and small . characters : adamson. adderley
- he is best known for these semi-autobiographical works, which are often referred to collectively as all creatures great and small, a title
- the compound of small stellated dodecahedron and great dodecahedron is a polyhedron compound where the great dodecahedron is interior to
- the great world and the small: more tales of the ominous and magical is a collection of dark fantasy short stories written by darrell
- farnon in the television version of james herriot 's all creatures great and small , and as the fifth incarnation of the doctor in doctor
-



Help for word Great-burnet.

Burnet Bur"net, n. [OE. burnet burnet; also, brownish (the plant perh. being named from its color), fr. F. brunet, dim. of brun brown; cf. OF. brunete a sort of flower. See Brunette.] (Bot.) A genus of perennial herbs (Poterium); especially, P.Sanguisorba, the common, or garden, burnet. Burnet moth (Zo["o]l.), in England, a handsome moth (Zyg[ae]na filipendula), with crimson spots on the wings. Burnet saxifrage. (Bot.) See Saxifrage. Canadian burnet, a marsh plant (Poterium Canadensis). Great burnet, Wild burnet, Poterium (or Sanguisorba) oficinalis.


Wiki for Great-burnet.

- sanguisorba officinalis (great burnet) is a plant in the family rosaceae , subfamily rosoideae . it is native throughout the cooler
- the common name is burnet. description sanguisorba officinalis - great burnet, burnet bloodwort, salad burnet. sanguisorba stipulata
- sanguisorba canadensis, or canadian burnet, is a perennial in the family rosaceae (great burnet) and sanguisorba minor (salad burnet), the
- the larva of this species first feeds on sanguisorba officinalis (great burnet), then move to an ant nest and are predators of the ant
- life cycle of this species is strongly related to sanguisorba officinalis (great burnet). references- external links: phengaris nausithous
- the meadows are one of the few sites for great burnet (sanguisorba officinalis) on exmoor. springs emerging from the base of sandstone
- damp, herb rich areas have uncommon plants characteristic of old meadows such as great burnet , sneezewort and devil's bit scabious .
- common herbs include common sorrel, rumex acetosa , wood cranesbill, geranium sylvaticum , and great burnet, sanguisorba officinalis .
- several damp hollows, probably former ponds, contain tussocky grassland with uncommon wild flowers such as great burnet , bog stitchwort
- the grassland has a variety of wild flowers including burnet saxifrage and the rare great burnet see also : nature reserves in barnet



Help for word Great-cassino.

Cassino Cas*si"no, n. [It. casino a small house, a gaming house. See casino.] A game at cards, played by two or more persons, usually for twenty-one points. Great cassino, the ten of diamonds. Little cassino, the two of spades.


Wiki for Great-cassino.

- 2 , km to the west of the town of cassino (the roman casinum according to gregory the great's biography of benedict, life of saint
- successor of pope gregory vii , yet his pontificate is far less impressive in history than his time as desiderius, the great abbot of monte cassino .
- the battle of monte cassino (also known as the battle for rome and the battle for officers were fixed on the great abbey of monte cassino:
- it is possible that the great abbey at monte cassino was involved, but the fact that the abbey is not listed as a subject house in
- marco mazzaroppi (san germano (cassino), 1550-1620) was an italian painter . the chapel of st gregory the great, and the martyrdom of st
- 605), a disciple and friend of gregory the great peter the deacon (chronicler), another monk of monte cassino, also called 'the librarian
- as a member of the army film unit, he filmed the battle of monte cassino , where the polish army suffered great losses, but helped to win
- before moving to monte cassino in the mountains of southern italy . and, eventually, founded the great benedictine monastery of monte
- in 914, he succeeded in having the great abbey of monte cassino transferred from teano to capua and he and atenulf appointed one john
- st. gregory the great , in his dialogues, tells us that she was a nun and plombariola , about five miles from benedict's abbey at monte cassino .



Help for word Great-climacteric.

Climacteric Cli*mac"ter*ic, n. 1. A period in human life in which some great change is supposed to take place in the constitution. The critical periods are thought by some to be the years produced by multiplying 7 into the odd numbers 3, 5, 7, and 9; to which others add the 81st year. 2. Any critical period. It is your lot, as it was mine, to live during one of the grand climacterics of the world. --Southey. Grand or Great climacteric, the sixty-third year of human life. I should hardly yield my rigid fibers to be regenerated by them; nor begin, in my grand climacteric, to squall in their new accents, or to stammer, in my second cradle, the elemental sounds of their barbarous metaphysics. --Burke.


Wiki for Great-climacteric.

- of them has been running a race with old time for more than ninety years – one having exceeded his great climacteric 28, the other 33 years.
- in a late appearance, according to a fragmentary papyrus , alexander the great paused at the syrian seashore before the climacteric battle
- in ancient greek philosophy and astrology , the climacterics (latin, annus to the body, and be at a great risk of death during these years.
- great expectations is charles dickens 's thirteenth novel. chapter great expectations and the climacteric economy , title victorian studies
- a model organism to study the fruit ripening of climacteric fruit. title bioengineered tomatoes taste great , date july 1995 , journal
- the time of the principate was climacteric in the history of georgia although they enjoyed the loyalty of the great nobles, were of limited
- grape – non-climacteric fruit that grows on the perennial and group1 wine regions , list1 great southern margaret river swan valley
- the preservation of the nature of the human species a very great good. process to the menopause, they may experience the male climacteric .
- image:great saphenous vein thrombosis 05091312009. therapy and tibolone on climacteric symptoms and sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women.
- the church at great torrington being then considered too far for grand climacteric year , in hope of the blessed resurrection of the just. '
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Help for word great-Dane.

Dane Dane, n. [LL. Dani: cf. AS. Dene.] A native, or a naturalized inhabitant, of Denmark. Great Dane. (Zo["o]l.) See Danish dog, under Danish., Danish Dan"ish, a. [See Dane.] Belonging to the Danes, or to their language or country. -- n. The language of the Danes. Danish dog (Zo["o]l.), one of a large and powerful breed of dogs reared in Denmark; -- called also great Dane. See Illustration in Appendix.


Wiki for great-Dane.

- the great dane, is a german breed of domestic dog (canis lupus familiaris) known for its giant size the name of the breed in germany is
- the great dane may refer to: nils middelboe (1887–1976), a danish football player (attacker) victor borge (1909–2000), a danish comedian
- the albany great danes are the intercollegiate athletic programs of the university at albany, suny . the university's intercollegiate
- the project, funded through alumni donations, doubled the size of the great danes' previous facilities. in february 2012, university
- the albany great danes basketball team is the basketball team that represent the university at albany, state university of new york in
- the albany great danes football program is the intercollegiate american football team for the university at albany located in the u.s.
- the albany great danes baseball team is a varsity intercollegiate athletic team of the university at albany in albany, new york , usa the
- the albany great danes men's lacrosse team represents the university at albany in ncaa division i men's college lacrosse .
- the angeles university foundation (auf) great danes are the varsity teams of angeles university foundation of angeles , pampanga .
- the 2013 albany great danes football team represented the university at albany, suny in the 2013 ncaa division i fcs football season .



Help for word Great-emerald.

Bird of paradise Bird" of par"a*dise (Zo["o]l.) The name of several very beautiful birds of the genus Paradisea and allied genera, inhabiting New Guinea and the adjacent islands. The males have brilliant colors, elegant plumes, and often remarkable tail feathers. Note: The Great emerald (Paradisea apoda) and the Lesser emerald (P. minor) furnish many of the plumes used as ornaments by ladies; the Red is P. rubra or sanguinea; the Golden is Parotia aurea or sexsetacea; the King is Cincinnurus regius. The name is also applied to the longer-billed birds of another related group (Epimachin[ae]) from the same region. The Twelve-wired (Seleucides alba) is one of these. See Paradise bird, and Note under Apod.


Wiki for Great-emerald.

- vaillantella maassi (great emeralder, spiny eel loach, giant scissortail loach, forktail loach) is a species of loach in the
- the grass emerald (pseudoterpna pruinata) is a moth species that is fairly common throughout great britain with the exception of northern
- the great emerald stolen by napoleon's troops, which had once been on the tiara of pope julius ii , was placed on the tiara in the monde
- 'thrice great these writings have greatly influenced the western esoteric is derived from the the emerald tablet of hermes trismegistus ,
- production of the series with the emerald city of oz (1910), by glinda's great book of records is introduced in chapter 29 of the emerald
- the downy emerald (cordulia aenea) is a species of dragonfly . some of its historic native area in great britain due to habitat loss,
- among these are the patricia emerald, a 632 carat (126 g) stone that is considered one of the world's great emeralds for its size and
- emerald is a gemstone , and a variety of the mineral beryl (be 3 al 2(sio 3)6) gemmological association of great britain , volume 30 ,
- emerald is a town and semi-rural locality in the greater melbourne area, victoria 2006 had 2,403 participants in the 25th great train race.
- (28.10 carats) and great emerald (17 carats) of louis xiv , the diamond pins of queen marie antoinette , the diamond-portrait (9.10 carats