OnlineHelpWords
divine


Definition for word major.

Major Ma"jor, [L. major, compar. of magnus great: cf. F. majeur. Cf. Master, Mayor, Magnitude, More, a.] 1. Greater in number, quantity, or extent; as, the major part of the assembly; the major part of the revenue; the major part of the territory. 2. Of greater dignity; more important. --Shak. 3. Of full legal age. [Obs.] 4. (Mus.) Greater by a semitone, either in interval or in difference of pitch from another tone. Major axis (Geom.), the greater axis. See Focus, n., 2. Major key (Mus.), a key in which one and two, two and three, four and five, five and six and seven, make major seconds, and three and four, and seven and eight, make minor seconds. Major offense (Law), an offense of a greater degree which contains a lesser offense, as murder and robbery include assault. Major premise (Logic), that premise of a syllogism which contains the major term. Major scale (Mus.), the natural diatonic scale, which has semitones between the third and fourth, and seventh and fourth, and seventh and eighth degrees; the scale of the major mode, of which the third is major. See Scale, and Diatonic. Major second (Mus.), a second between whose tones is a difference in pitch of a step. Major sixth (Mus.), a sixth of four steps and a half step. In major keys the third and sixth from the key tone are major. Major keys and intervals, as distinguished from minors, are more cheerful. Major term (Logic), that term of a syllogism which forms the predicate of the conclusion. Major third (Mus.), a third of two steps., Major Ma"jor, n. [F. major. See Major, a.] 1. (Mil.) An officer next in rank above a captain and next below a lieutenant colonel; the lowest field officer. 2. (Law) A person of full age. 3. (Logic) That premise which contains the major term. It its the first proposition of a regular syllogism; as: No unholy person is qualified for happiness in heaven [the major]. Every man in his natural state is unholy [minor]. Therefore, no man in his natural state is qualified for happiness in heaven [conclusion or inference]. Note: In hypothetical syllogisms, the hypothetical premise is called the major. 4. [LL. See Major.] A mayor. [Obs.] --Bacon.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for major.

- major is a rank of commissioned officer , with corresponding ranks existing in many military forces. when used unhyphenated, in
- major is a sports manga series by takuya mitsuda . it has been serialized in shōnen sunday and has been collected in 78 tankōbon
- major's was the name of an american chain of department store s with outlets in many states east of the mississippi river in the decades
- major league baseball (mlb) is a professional baseball organization which constitutes one of the four major professional sports leagues
- the men's major golf championships, commonly known as the major championships and often referred to simply as the majors, are the four most
- in the united states army , air force , and marine corps , major is a field grade military officer rank just above the rank of captain
- major general or major-general is a military rank used in many countries. it is derived from the older rank of sergeant major general .
- in the british military , major is a military rank which is used by both the british army and royal marines . the rank is superior to
- sir john major. post-noms kg , ch , acib. (born 29 march 1943) is a british conservative politician who served as prime minister of the
- a bachelor's degree is usually an academic degree earned for a graduate course of study or major that in theory, depending on the location


We found definition for major you search from dictionaries , wikipedia mentions for major.

Similar meaning for word major.



Help for word major-axis.

Major Ma"jor, [L. major, compar. of magnus great: cf. F. majeur. Cf. Master, Mayor, Magnitude, More, a.] 1. Greater in number, quantity, or extent; as, the major part of the assembly; the major part of the revenue; the major part of the territory. 2. Of greater dignity; more important. --Shak. 3. Of full legal age. [Obs.] 4. (Mus.) Greater by a semitone, either in interval or in difference of pitch from another tone. Major axis (Geom.), the greater axis. See Focus, n., 2. Major key (Mus.), a key in which one and two, two and three, four and five, five and six and seven, make major seconds, and three and four, and seven and eight, make minor seconds. Major offense (Law), an offense of a greater degree which contains a lesser offense, as murder and robbery include assault. Major premise (Logic), that premise of a syllogism which contains the major term. Major scale (Mus.), the natural diatonic scale, which has semitones between the third and fourth, and seventh and fourth, and seventh and eighth degrees; the scale of the major mode, of which the third is major. See Scale, and Diatonic. Major second (Mus.), a second between whose tones is a difference in pitch of a step. Major sixth (Mus.), a sixth of four steps and a half step. In major keys the third and sixth from the key tone are major. Major keys and intervals, as distinguished from minors, are more cheerful. Major term (Logic), that term of a syllogism which forms the predicate of the conclusion. Major third (Mus.), a third of two steps., Axis Ax"is, n.; pl. Axes. [L. axis axis, axle. See Axle.] A straight line, real or imaginary, passing through a body, on which it revolves, or may be supposed to revolve; a line passing through a body or system around which the parts are symmetrically arranged. 2. (Math.) A straight line with respect to which the different parts of a magnitude are symmetrically arranged; as, the axis of a cylinder, i. e., the axis of a cone, that is, the straight line joining the vertex and the center of the base; the axis of a circle, any straight line passing through the center. 3. (Bot.) The stem; the central part, or longitudinal support, on which organs or parts are arranged; the central line of any body. --Gray. 4. (Anat.) (a) The second vertebra of the neck, or vertebra dentata. (b) Also used of the body only of the vertebra, which is prolonged anteriorly within the foramen of the first vertebra or atlas, so as to form the odontoid process or peg which serves as a pivot for the atlas and head to turn upon. 5. (Crystallog.) One of several imaginary lines, assumed in describing the position of the planes by which a crystal is bounded. 6. (Fine Arts) The primary or secondary central line of any design. Anticlinal axis (Geol.), a line or ridge from which the strata slope downward on the two opposite sides. Synclinal axis, a line from which the strata slope upward in opposite directions, so as to form a valley. Axis cylinder (Anat.), the neuraxis or essential, central substance of a nerve fiber; -- called also axis band, axial fiber, and cylinder axis. Axis in peritrochio, the wheel and axle, one of the mechanical powers. Axis of a curve (Geom.), a straight line which bisects a system of parallel chords of a curve; called a principal axis, when cutting them at right angles, in which case it divides the curve into two symmetrical portions, as in the parabola, which has one such axis, the ellipse, which has two, or the circle, which has an infinite number. The two axes of the ellipse are the major axis and the minor axis, and the two axes of the hyperbola are the transverse axis and the conjugate axis. Axis of a lens, the straight line passing through its center and perpendicular to its surfaces. Axis of a telescope or microscope, the straight line with which coincide the axes of the several lenses which compose it. Axes of co["o]rdinates in a plane, two straight lines intersecting each other, to which points are referred for the purpose of determining their relative position: they are either rectangular or oblique. Axes of co["o]rdinates in space, the three straight lines in which the co["o]rdinate planes intersect each other. Axis of a balance, that line about which it turns. Axis of oscillation, of a pendulum, a right line passing through the center about which it vibrates, and perpendicular to the plane of vibration. Axis of polarization, the central line around which the prismatic rings or curves are arranged. --Brewster. Axis of revolution (Descriptive Geom.), a straight line about which some line or plane is revolved, so that the several points of the line or plane shall describe circles with their centers in the fixed line, and their planes perpendicular to it, the line describing a surface of revolution, and the plane a solid of revolution. Axis of symmetry (Geom.), any line in a plane figure which divides the figure into two such parts that one part, when folded over along the axis, shall coincide with the other part. Axis of the equator, ecliptic, horizon (or other circle considered with reference to the sphere on which it lies), the diameter of the sphere which is perpendicular to the plane of the circle. --Hutton. Axis of the Ionic capital (Arch.), a line passing perpendicularly through the middle of the eye of the volute. Neutral axis (Mech.), the line of demarcation between the horizontal elastic forces of tension and compression, exerted by the fibers in any cross section of a girder. Optic axis of a crystal, the direction in which a ray of transmitted light suffers no double refraction. All crystals, not of the isometric system, are either uniaxial or biaxial. Optic axis, Visual axis (Opt.), the straight line passing through the center of the pupil, and perpendicular to the surface of the eye. Radical axis of two circles (Geom.), the straight line perpendicular to the line joining their centers and such that the tangents from any point of it to the two circles shall be equal to each other. Spiral axis (Arch.), the axis of a twisted column drawn spirally in order to trace the circumvolutions without. Axis of abscissas and Axis of ordinates. See Abscissa.


Wiki for major-axis.

- between small local gangs as the major cause of the area's unsolved select vs9bb0_8axi_3bf5suknyw#vs9bb0_8axi_3bf5suknyw palou community
- major, richard henry (1868) the discoveries of prince henry the 'aquest flum es apelat ued anil axi matex es apelat riu de lor per tal com
- major races axi-tun - first appeared in fantastic four a humanoid race that appears much like tall humans, with an average height of 6'4
- the basic structure of an annexin is composed of two major domains. annexin a-xi has also been shown to organize cell membrane properties.
- by contrast, the three 'axi' cars had further modifications to the there have also been major finds in the last few years of 'pilot cars
- major immigration : european union countries are given in bold. , external links : es/inebase/cgi/axi? axis_path/inebase/temas/t20/e245/p08/
- traveled to california on their first major competition, receiving welling, creator of the axi series on youtube which they regularly star in.
- (including nisu, sani, axi, lolo, acheh) and sometimes speak mutually magic plays a major role in daily life through healing, exorcism,
- major authors included ihara saikaku , chikamatsu monzaemon , matsuo final examples: gozàru gozàr, fitòtçu fitòtç, and àxi no fàra àx no fàra.
- ge aviation , first run 1980s , major applications lockheed p-7 weight 1104.7 lb , compressor 5+1 axi-centrifugal compressor (5 axial



Help for word Major-general.

Major general Ma"jor gen"er*al An officer of the army holding a rank next above that of brigadier general and next below that of lieutenant general, and who usually commands a division or a corps.


Wiki for Major-general.

- major general or major-general is a military rank used in many countries. it is derived from the older rank of sergeant major general .
- in the united states army , united states marine corps , and united states air force , major general is a two-star general-officer rank,
- major general (maj gen) is a 2 star rank in the british army and royal marines . the rank was used by the royal air force from 1918 to
- a general officer is an officer of high military ranks , usually in the army, and the rank of major general is a shorter form of sergeant
- the general officer s of the confederate states army (csa) were the senior allowing for the appointment of major generals as well as
- major general (abbreviated majgen) is a senior rank of the australian army , and was created as a direct equivalent of the british
- vice admiral is a senior naval flag officer rank, equivalent to lieutenant general and major general , and junior to an admiral and general .
- lieutenant general (abbreviated ltg in the army, lt gen in the air force, and lieutenant general ranks above major general and below
- general (ɡenəˈʁaːl) is the highest rank of the german army and german air force . as a four-star rank it is the equivalent to the rank
- the highest-ranking officer in the royal marines at present is major general it has a nato code of of-8 , and is the equivalent of a



Help for word Major-key.

Major Ma"jor, [L. major, compar. of magnus great: cf. F. majeur. Cf. Master, Mayor, Magnitude, More, a.] 1. Greater in number, quantity, or extent; as, the major part of the assembly; the major part of the revenue; the major part of the territory. 2. Of greater dignity; more important. --Shak. 3. Of full legal age. [Obs.] 4. (Mus.) Greater by a semitone, either in interval or in difference of pitch from another tone. Major axis (Geom.), the greater axis. See Focus, n., 2. Major key (Mus.), a key in which one and two, two and three, four and five, five and six and seven, make major seconds, and three and four, and seven and eight, make minor seconds. Major offense (Law), an offense of a greater degree which contains a lesser offense, as murder and robbery include assault. Major premise (Logic), that premise of a syllogism which contains the major term. Major scale (Mus.), the natural diatonic scale, which has semitones between the third and fourth, and seventh and fourth, and seventh and eighth degrees; the scale of the major mode, of which the third is major. See Scale, and Diatonic. Major second (Mus.), a second between whose tones is a difference in pitch of a step. Major sixth (Mus.), a sixth of four steps and a half step. In major keys the third and sixth from the key tone are major. Major keys and intervals, as distinguished from minors, are more cheerful. Major term (Logic), that term of a syllogism which forms the predicate of the conclusion. Major third (Mus.), a third of two steps.


Wiki for Major-key.

- the major scale or ionian scale is one of the most commonly used scales . seven sharps or flats make major keys (c sharp major or c flat
- the band the major keys and made releases crediting eva eastwood and the major keys through the small tail records label based in jönköping
- classical music (and in other genres) of writing music in sets of pieces that collectively cover all the major and minor keys of the scale.
- in music , relative keys are the major and minor scale s that have the same key signature s. minor of a particular major key , or the
- g major (or the key of g) is a major scale based on g, with the pitches g , a , b , c , d , e , and f music , sharp . its key signature
- the f major scale (or the key of f) consists of the pitches f , g , a , b music , flat , c , d , and e . its key signature has one flat
- minor of a particular major key is the minor key based on the same tonic ; similarly the parallel major has the same tonic as the minor key.
- in musical notation , a key signature is a set of sharp or flat symbols placed the key note or tonic of a piece in a major key is
- major/minor compositions are musical composition s that begin in a major key and end in a minor key (generally the parallel minor ),
- d major (or the key of d) is a major scale based on d , consisting of the pitches d , e , f music , sharp , g , a , b , and c music ,



Help for word Major-offense.

Major Ma"jor, [L. major, compar. of magnus great: cf. F. majeur. Cf. Master, Mayor, Magnitude, More, a.] 1. Greater in number, quantity, or extent; as, the major part of the assembly; the major part of the revenue; the major part of the territory. 2. Of greater dignity; more important. --Shak. 3. Of full legal age. [Obs.] 4. (Mus.) Greater by a semitone, either in interval or in difference of pitch from another tone. Major axis (Geom.), the greater axis. See Focus, n., 2. Major key (Mus.), a key in which one and two, two and three, four and five, five and six and seven, make major seconds, and three and four, and seven and eight, make minor seconds. Major offense (Law), an offense of a greater degree which contains a lesser offense, as murder and robbery include assault. Major premise (Logic), that premise of a syllogism which contains the major term. Major scale (Mus.), the natural diatonic scale, which has semitones between the third and fourth, and seventh and fourth, and seventh and eighth degrees; the scale of the major mode, of which the third is major. See Scale, and Diatonic. Major second (Mus.), a second between whose tones is a difference in pitch of a step. Major sixth (Mus.), a sixth of four steps and a half step. In major keys the third and sixth from the key tone are major. Major keys and intervals, as distinguished from minors, are more cheerful. Major term (Logic), that term of a syllogism which forms the predicate of the conclusion. Major third (Mus.), a third of two steps.


Wiki for Major-offense.

- issues cumulative demerits, or points to drivers on conviction for road traffic offenses. a major offense may lead to more than the
- in exchange for pleading guilty to a minor charge, she averted being prosecuted for the major offenses but agreed to serve as a witness
- a majority vote is needed to put the accused on trial a majority vote convicts for a minor offense, and a two-thirds vote for a major
- his legal career has spanned representation of individuals charged with major offenses from watergate to the present time. as a lieutenant
- while major offenses are defined as 'any offense which jeopardizes the reputation or standards of the philomathean literary society.'
- the last major offense : on 17 march 1853, gold-buyer edward ritter and his brother-in-law samuel maxwell alexander were riding in their
- modern scholars suspect that he must have been in disgrace at court for some unrecorded mistake or other major offense typically resulting
- the millsaps majors is the nickname for the sports teams of millsaps college in for the 5th year in a row, the majors' offense was the
- the offense was popularized at the major college level by john skip, attack, attack'), the offense is also sometimes known as the 'walberg
- the option offense is a generic term that is used to describe a wide variety of there has been a resurgence of option offenses in major



Help for word Major-premise.

Major Ma"jor, [L. major, compar. of magnus great: cf. F. majeur. Cf. Master, Mayor, Magnitude, More, a.] 1. Greater in number, quantity, or extent; as, the major part of the assembly; the major part of the revenue; the major part of the territory. 2. Of greater dignity; more important. --Shak. 3. Of full legal age. [Obs.] 4. (Mus.) Greater by a semitone, either in interval or in difference of pitch from another tone. Major axis (Geom.), the greater axis. See Focus, n., 2. Major key (Mus.), a key in which one and two, two and three, four and five, five and six and seven, make major seconds, and three and four, and seven and eight, make minor seconds. Major offense (Law), an offense of a greater degree which contains a lesser offense, as murder and robbery include assault. Major premise (Logic), that premise of a syllogism which contains the major term. Major scale (Mus.), the natural diatonic scale, which has semitones between the third and fourth, and seventh and fourth, and seventh and eighth degrees; the scale of the major mode, of which the third is major. See Scale, and Diatonic. Major second (Mus.), a second between whose tones is a difference in pitch of a step. Major sixth (Mus.), a sixth of four steps and a half step. In major keys the third and sixth from the key tone are major. Major keys and intervals, as distinguished from minors, are more cheerful. Major term (Logic), that term of a syllogism which forms the predicate of the conclusion. Major third (Mus.), a third of two steps.


Wiki for Major-premise.

- inferred from two or more others (the premise s) of a specific form. the major premise links m with p and the minor premise links m with
- in a categorical syllogism that is invalid because its major term is undistributed in the major premise but distributed in the conclusion.
- the major premise of cradle is contact between a few humans from the miami area in 1994 and the super robots of a damaged space ship
- the end terms in a categorical syllogism are the major term and the minor term middle term in the major premise and minor premise, respectively.
- from which diogenes laërtius quotes:an argument, as crinis says, is that which is composed of a lemma or major premise , an assumption
- of a categorical proposition in both premise s but not in the conclusion of a the major term and the minor term s, also called the end
- that is committed when the middle term in a categorical syllogism is not distributed in either the minor premise or the major premise .
- note: this argument is now valid but unsound because the major premise is untrue. the fallacy of four terms also applies to syllogisms that
- a syllogism is a three-proposition argument consisting of a major premise stating some universal truth, a minor premise stating some
- major premise all innate human desires have objects that exist. by 'innate' we mean those desires that are universal. the desire for food



Help for word Major-scale.

Major Ma"jor, [L. major, compar. of magnus great: cf. F. majeur. Cf. Master, Mayor, Magnitude, More, a.] 1. Greater in number, quantity, or extent; as, the major part of the assembly; the major part of the revenue; the major part of the territory. 2. Of greater dignity; more important. --Shak. 3. Of full legal age. [Obs.] 4. (Mus.) Greater by a semitone, either in interval or in difference of pitch from another tone. Major axis (Geom.), the greater axis. See Focus, n., 2. Major key (Mus.), a key in which one and two, two and three, four and five, five and six and seven, make major seconds, and three and four, and seven and eight, make minor seconds. Major offense (Law), an offense of a greater degree which contains a lesser offense, as murder and robbery include assault. Major premise (Logic), that premise of a syllogism which contains the major term. Major scale (Mus.), the natural diatonic scale, which has semitones between the third and fourth, and seventh and fourth, and seventh and eighth degrees; the scale of the major mode, of which the third is major. See Scale, and Diatonic. Major second (Mus.), a second between whose tones is a difference in pitch of a step. Major sixth (Mus.), a sixth of four steps and a half step. In major keys the third and sixth from the key tone are major. Major keys and intervals, as distinguished from minors, are more cheerful. Major term (Logic), that term of a syllogism which forms the predicate of the conclusion. Major third (Mus.), a third of two steps.


Wiki for Major-scale.

- the major scale or ionian scale is one of the most commonly used scale s. it is one of the diatonic scale s. like many musical scales it
- in music , a scale is any set of musical notes ordered by fundamental frequency for instance, the increasing c major scale is c–d–e–f–g–
- a major (or the key of a) is a major scale based on a, with the pitches a , b , c music , sharp , d , e , f music , sharp , and g music ,
- in music theory , a diatonic scale (or heptatonia prima) is an eight- note musical pitches which form the c- major scale can be obtained
- in music, the major locrian scale, also called the locrian major scale, is the scale obtained by sharpening the second and third degrees of
- in music theory , the harmonic major scale is a musical scale which found occasional use during the common practice era and is now
- the c major scale (often just c or key of c) consists of the pitches c , d , e , f , g , a , and b . its key signature has no flats/
- in music , the double harmonic major scale is a scale whose gaps may evoke 'exotic' music to western listeners. arabic and the byzantine scale.
- in music , the major neapolitan scale and the minor neapolitan scale are two musical scale s, one minor, one major . the sequence of scale
- ptolemy's intense diatonic scale, also known as ptolemaic sequence justly tuned major scale or syntonous (or syntonic) diatonic scale, is