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Definition for word optic.

Optic Op"tic, n. [From Optic, a.] 1. The organ of sight; an eye. The difference is as great between The optics seeing, as the object seen. --Pope. 2. An eyeglass. [Obs.] --Herbert.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for optic.

- as light signals travel down a fibre optic cable, it undergoes total internal reflection allowing for essentially no light lost over the
- an optic is something that changes the behavior or properties of light. optic may also refer to: alcoholic spirits measure , a device for
- the optic nerve, also known as cranial nerve ii, transmits visual information from the retina to the brain . the optic nerve does not
- the fundus (area opposite the pupil) shows the characteristic pale optic disk (papilla), where vessels entering the eye pass across and
- etched reticles are images of the desired reticle layout that are etched on an optic element. this optical element (lens) with the etched
- the optic nerve contains axons of nerve cells that emerge from the retina, leave the eye at the optic disc, and go to the visual cortex
- the optic chiasm or optic chiasma (greek grc , χίασμα, 'crossing', from the greek grc , χιάζω 'to mark with an x', after the greek
- the optic disc or optic nerve head is the location where ganglion cell axons exit the eye to form the optic nerve . there are no light
- optic neuritis is a multi-etiological condition consisting in the inflammation of the optic nerve that may cause a complete or partial
- fiber-optic communication is a method of transmitting information from one place to another by sending pulses of light through an optical


We found definition for optic you search from dictionaries , wikipedia mentions for optic.

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Help for word Optic-axis.

Axis Ax"is, n.; pl. Axes. [L. axis axis, axle. See Axle.] A straight line, real or imaginary, passing through a body, on which it revolves, or may be supposed to revolve; a line passing through a body or system around which the parts are symmetrically arranged. 2. (Math.) A straight line with respect to which the different parts of a magnitude are symmetrically arranged; as, the axis of a cylinder, i. e., the axis of a cone, that is, the straight line joining the vertex and the center of the base; the axis of a circle, any straight line passing through the center. 3. (Bot.) The stem; the central part, or longitudinal support, on which organs or parts are arranged; the central line of any body. --Gray. 4. (Anat.) (a) The second vertebra of the neck, or vertebra dentata. (b) Also used of the body only of the vertebra, which is prolonged anteriorly within the foramen of the first vertebra or atlas, so as to form the odontoid process or peg which serves as a pivot for the atlas and head to turn upon. 5. (Crystallog.) One of several imaginary lines, assumed in describing the position of the planes by which a crystal is bounded. 6. (Fine Arts) The primary or secondary central line of any design. Anticlinal axis (Geol.), a line or ridge from which the strata slope downward on the two opposite sides. Synclinal axis, a line from which the strata slope upward in opposite directions, so as to form a valley. Axis cylinder (Anat.), the neuraxis or essential, central substance of a nerve fiber; -- called also axis band, axial fiber, and cylinder axis. Axis in peritrochio, the wheel and axle, one of the mechanical powers. Axis of a curve (Geom.), a straight line which bisects a system of parallel chords of a curve; called a principal axis, when cutting them at right angles, in which case it divides the curve into two symmetrical portions, as in the parabola, which has one such axis, the ellipse, which has two, or the circle, which has an infinite number. The two axes of the ellipse are the major axis and the minor axis, and the two axes of the hyperbola are the transverse axis and the conjugate axis. Axis of a lens, the straight line passing through its center and perpendicular to its surfaces. Axis of a telescope or microscope, the straight line with which coincide the axes of the several lenses which compose it. Axes of co["o]rdinates in a plane, two straight lines intersecting each other, to which points are referred for the purpose of determining their relative position: they are either rectangular or oblique. Axes of co["o]rdinates in space, the three straight lines in which the co["o]rdinate planes intersect each other. Axis of a balance, that line about which it turns. Axis of oscillation, of a pendulum, a right line passing through the center about which it vibrates, and perpendicular to the plane of vibration. Axis of polarization, the central line around which the prismatic rings or curves are arranged. --Brewster. Axis of revolution (Descriptive Geom.), a straight line about which some line or plane is revolved, so that the several points of the line or plane shall describe circles with their centers in the fixed line, and their planes perpendicular to it, the line describing a surface of revolution, and the plane a solid of revolution. Axis of symmetry (Geom.), any line in a plane figure which divides the figure into two such parts that one part, when folded over along the axis, shall coincide with the other part. Axis of the equator, ecliptic, horizon (or other circle considered with reference to the sphere on which it lies), the diameter of the sphere which is perpendicular to the plane of the circle. --Hutton. Axis of the Ionic capital (Arch.), a line passing perpendicularly through the middle of the eye of the volute. Neutral axis (Mech.), the line of demarcation between the horizontal elastic forces of tension and compression, exerted by the fibers in any cross section of a girder. Optic axis of a crystal, the direction in which a ray of transmitted light suffers no double refraction. All crystals, not of the isometric system, are either uniaxial or biaxial. Optic axis, Visual axis (Opt.), the straight line passing through the center of the pupil, and perpendicular to the surface of the eye. Radical axis of two circles (Geom.), the straight line perpendicular to the line joining their centers and such that the tangents from any point of it to the two circles shall be equal to each other. Spiral axis (Arch.), the axis of a twisted column drawn spirally in order to trace the circumvolutions without. Axis of abscissas and Axis of ordinates. See Abscissa.


Wiki for Optic-axis.



Help for word Optic-axis-of-a-crystal.

Axis Ax"is, n.; pl. Axes. [L. axis axis, axle. See Axle.] A straight line, real or imaginary, passing through a body, on which it revolves, or may be supposed to revolve; a line passing through a body or system around which the parts are symmetrically arranged. 2. (Math.) A straight line with respect to which the different parts of a magnitude are symmetrically arranged; as, the axis of a cylinder, i. e., the axis of a cone, that is, the straight line joining the vertex and the center of the base; the axis of a circle, any straight line passing through the center. 3. (Bot.) The stem; the central part, or longitudinal support, on which organs or parts are arranged; the central line of any body. --Gray. 4. (Anat.) (a) The second vertebra of the neck, or vertebra dentata. (b) Also used of the body only of the vertebra, which is prolonged anteriorly within the foramen of the first vertebra or atlas, so as to form the odontoid process or peg which serves as a pivot for the atlas and head to turn upon. 5. (Crystallog.) One of several imaginary lines, assumed in describing the position of the planes by which a crystal is bounded. 6. (Fine Arts) The primary or secondary central line of any design. Anticlinal axis (Geol.), a line or ridge from which the strata slope downward on the two opposite sides. Synclinal axis, a line from which the strata slope upward in opposite directions, so as to form a valley. Axis cylinder (Anat.), the neuraxis or essential, central substance of a nerve fiber; -- called also axis band, axial fiber, and cylinder axis. Axis in peritrochio, the wheel and axle, one of the mechanical powers. Axis of a curve (Geom.), a straight line which bisects a system of parallel chords of a curve; called a principal axis, when cutting them at right angles, in which case it divides the curve into two symmetrical portions, as in the parabola, which has one such axis, the ellipse, which has two, or the circle, which has an infinite number. The two axes of the ellipse are the major axis and the minor axis, and the two axes of the hyperbola are the transverse axis and the conjugate axis. Axis of a lens, the straight line passing through its center and perpendicular to its surfaces. Axis of a telescope or microscope, the straight line with which coincide the axes of the several lenses which compose it. Axes of co["o]rdinates in a plane, two straight lines intersecting each other, to which points are referred for the purpose of determining their relative position: they are either rectangular or oblique. Axes of co["o]rdinates in space, the three straight lines in which the co["o]rdinate planes intersect each other. Axis of a balance, that line about which it turns. Axis of oscillation, of a pendulum, a right line passing through the center about which it vibrates, and perpendicular to the plane of vibration. Axis of polarization, the central line around which the prismatic rings or curves are arranged. --Brewster. Axis of revolution (Descriptive Geom.), a straight line about which some line or plane is revolved, so that the several points of the line or plane shall describe circles with their centers in the fixed line, and their planes perpendicular to it, the line describing a surface of revolution, and the plane a solid of revolution. Axis of symmetry (Geom.), any line in a plane figure which divides the figure into two such parts that one part, when folded over along the axis, shall coincide with the other part. Axis of the equator, ecliptic, horizon (or other circle considered with reference to the sphere on which it lies), the diameter of the sphere which is perpendicular to the plane of the circle. --Hutton. Axis of the Ionic capital (Arch.), a line passing perpendicularly through the middle of the eye of the volute. Neutral axis (Mech.), the line of demarcation between the horizontal elastic forces of tension and compression, exerted by the fibers in any cross section of a girder. Optic axis of a crystal, the direction in which a ray of transmitted light suffers no double refraction. All crystals, not of the isometric system, are either uniaxial or biaxial. Optic axis, Visual axis (Opt.), the straight line passing through the center of the pupil, and perpendicular to the surface of the eye. Radical axis of two circles (Geom.), the straight line perpendicular to the line joining their centers and such that the tangents from any point of it to the two circles shall be equal to each other. Spiral axis (Arch.), the axis of a twisted column drawn spirally in order to trace the circumvolutions without. Axis of abscissas and Axis of ordinates. See Abscissa.


Wiki for Optic-axis-of-a-crystal.



Help for word optic-thalamus.

Thalamus Thal"a*mus, n.; pl. Thalami. [L. thalamus chamber, Gr. qa`lamos.] 1. (Anat.) A mass of nervous matter on either side of the third ventricle of the brain; -- called also optic thalamus. 2. (Bot.) (a) Same as Thallus. (b) The receptacle of a flower; a torus.


Wiki for optic-thalamus.

- structures , and emotional feeling results from stimulations of the dorsal thalamus. longer present when the optic thalamus was removed
- the lgn is found inside the thalamus of the brain ascending retinal ganglion cell s via the optic tract and from the reticular activating system .
- diencephalon /thalamencephalon - thalamus : 808 thalami (optic thalamus ) extremities. anterior extremity the optic nerve: (197 882
- this led to the first accurate account of the functions of the optic thalamus and its relation to the cerebral cortex. the two men
- lights rays followed the optic nerves to the optic thalamus, where they were converted into sensations, and then to an area in the third
- brain tumours and optic chiasm, traumatic hysteria, and writing disorders. (a case of tumor of the optic thalamus and temporal lobe) ,
- with gordon holmes: a case of lesion of the optic thalamus with autopsy. brain, 1911–12, 34, 255–271.) case showing an abnormal condition
- the thalamus (from greek θάλαμος , 'inner chamber is a midline symmetrical png , the left optic nerve and the optic tracts.
- fibers to thalamus : optic nerve about 90% of the axons in the optic nerve go to the lateral geniculate nucleus in the thalamus .
- the optic radiation (also known as the geniculo- s in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus carrying visual information to



Help for word optica.

Biprism Bi"prism, n. [Pref. bi- + prism.] 1. A prism whose refracting angle is very nearly 180 degrees. 2. A combination of two short rectangular glass prisms cemented together at their diagonal faces so as to form a cube; -- called also optical cube. It is used in one form of photometer., Optically Op"tic*al*ly, adv. By optics or sight; with reference to optics., Optically active, Optically inactive (Chem. Physics), terms used of certain metameric substances which, while identical with each other in other respects, differ in this, viz., that they do or do not produce right-handed or left-handed circular polarization of light. Optically positive, Optically negative. See under Refraction., Optically active, Optically inactive (Chem. Physics), terms used of certain metameric substances which, while identical with each other in other respects, differ in this, viz., that they do or do not produce right-handed or left-handed circular polarization of light. Optically positive, Optically negative. See under Refraction., Optically active, Optically inactive (Chem. Physics), terms used of certain metameric substances which, while identical with each other in other respects, differ in this, viz., that they do or do not produce right-handed or left-handed circular polarization of light. Optically positive, Optically negative. See under Refraction., Optically active, Optically inactive (Chem. Physics), terms used of certain metameric substances which, while identical with each other in other respects, differ in this, viz., that they do or do not produce right-handed or left-handed circular polarization of light. Optically positive, Optically negative. See under Refraction., Scoptic Scop"tic, Scoptical Scop"tic*al, a. [Gr. skwptiko`s, from skw`ptein to mock, to scoff at.] Jesting; jeering; scoffing. [Obs.] --South. -- Scop"tic*al*ly, adv. [Obs.], Scoptic Scop"tic, Scoptical Scop"tic*al, a. [Gr. skwptiko`s, from skw`ptein to mock, to scoff at.] Jesting; jeering; scoffing. [Obs.] --South. -- Scop"tic*al*ly, adv. [Obs.], Synoptic Syn*op"tic, Synoptical Syn*op"tic*al, a. [Gr. ?: cf. F. synoptique. See Synopsis.] Affording a general view of the whole, or of the principal parts of a thing; as, a synoptic table; a synoptical statement of an argument. ``The synoptic Gospels.' --Alford. -- Syn*op"tic*al*ly, adv., Synoptic Syn*op"tic, Synoptical Syn*op"tic*al, a. [Gr. ?: cf. F. synoptique. See Synopsis.] Affording a general view of the whole, or of the principal parts of a thing; as, a synoptic table; a synoptical statement of an argument. ``The synoptic Gospels.' --Alford. -- Syn*op"tic*al*ly, adv.


Wiki for optica.



Help for word optical.

Biprism Bi"prism, n. [Pref. bi- + prism.] 1. A prism whose refracting angle is very nearly 180 degrees. 2. A combination of two short rectangular glass prisms cemented together at their diagonal faces so as to form a cube; -- called also optical cube. It is used in one form of photometer., Optically Op"tic*al*ly, adv. By optics or sight; with reference to optics., Optically active, Optically inactive (Chem. Physics), terms used of certain metameric substances which, while identical with each other in other respects, differ in this, viz., that they do or do not produce right-handed or left-handed circular polarization of light. Optically positive, Optically negative. See under Refraction., Optically active, Optically inactive (Chem. Physics), terms used of certain metameric substances which, while identical with each other in other respects, differ in this, viz., that they do or do not produce right-handed or left-handed circular polarization of light. Optically positive, Optically negative. See under Refraction., Optically active, Optically inactive (Chem. Physics), terms used of certain metameric substances which, while identical with each other in other respects, differ in this, viz., that they do or do not produce right-handed or left-handed circular polarization of light. Optically positive, Optically negative. See under Refraction., Optically active, Optically inactive (Chem. Physics), terms used of certain metameric substances which, while identical with each other in other respects, differ in this, viz., that they do or do not produce right-handed or left-handed circular polarization of light. Optically positive, Optically negative. See under Refraction., Scoptic Scop"tic, Scoptical Scop"tic*al, a. [Gr. skwptiko`s, from skw`ptein to mock, to scoff at.] Jesting; jeering; scoffing. [Obs.] --South. -- Scop"tic*al*ly, adv. [Obs.], Scoptic Scop"tic, Scoptical Scop"tic*al, a. [Gr. skwptiko`s, from skw`ptein to mock, to scoff at.] Jesting; jeering; scoffing. [Obs.] --South. -- Scop"tic*al*ly, adv. [Obs.], Synoptic Syn*op"tic, Synoptical Syn*op"tic*al, a. [Gr. ?: cf. F. synoptique. See Synopsis.] Affording a general view of the whole, or of the principal parts of a thing; as, a synoptic table; a synoptical statement of an argument. ``The synoptic Gospels.' --Alford. -- Syn*op"tic*al*ly, adv., Synoptic Syn*op"tic, Synoptical Syn*op"tic*al, a. [Gr. ?: cf. F. synoptique. See Synopsis.] Affording a general view of the whole, or of the principal parts of a thing; as, a synoptic table; a synoptical statement of an argument. ``The synoptic Gospels.' --Alford. -- Syn*op"tic*al*ly, adv.


Wiki for optical.

- most optical phenomena can be accounted for using the classical electromagnetic description of light. complete electromagnetic
- an optical fiber (or optical fibre) is a flexible, transparent fiber made of high quality extruded glass (silica ) or plastic, slightly
- in computing and optical disc recording technologies , an optical disc (od) is a flat, usually circular - disc which encodes binary data
- an optical fiber cable is a cable containing one or more optical fiber s. the optical fiber elements are typically individually coated
- the optical microscope, often referred to as the 'light microscope', is a type of microscope which uses visible light and a system of
- optical communication, also known as optical telecommunication, is communication at a distance using light to carry information.
- an optical telescope is a telescope which is used to gather and focus light mainly from the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum
- optical tweezers (originally called 'single-beam gradient force trap') are scientific instruments that use a highly focused laser beam to
- in computing , an optical disc drive (odd) is a disk drive that uses laser light or electromagnetic waves within or near the visible
- a lens is an optical device which transmits and refracts light , converging or diverging the beam . consists of a single optical element.



Help for word optical-cube.

Biprism Bi"prism, n. [Pref. bi- + prism.] 1. A prism whose refracting angle is very nearly 180 degrees. 2. A combination of two short rectangular glass prisms cemented together at their diagonal faces so as to form a cube; -- called also optical cube. It is used in one form of photometer.


Wiki for optical-cube.

- the necker cube is an optical illusion first published as a rhomboid in 1832 by swiss crystallographer louis albert necker
- electron microscopy ;mg molecular graphics ;optical optical microscopy .! com , 4d cube for life applications , avizo em mg optical mri
- optical corner reflectors, called corner cubes, made of three-sided glass prisms, are used in surveying and laser rangefinding.
- the optical path is shortened and the light cube delivers bright illumination intensities. each led lasts for more than 50,000 hours.
- an optical illusion (also called a visual illusion) is characterized by visually gif , cubes in increasing height image:kersten's shadow
- a beam splitter is an optical device that splits a beam of light in two. in its most common form, a cube, it is made from two triangular
- geographer he is best remembered for devising the optical illusion now known as the necker cube he was a keen mountaineer and spent the
- the fact that its design is similar to a small cube -shaped tetherball . nanomachine optical fiber provides many advantages over the other types
- polarization beam cube may have a low optical damage threshold value, and (3) the beam can be distorded in cube polarizers at very high attenuation.
- of a cube of transparent material such as conventional optical glass. this technique is used in advanced optical systems such as high-