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Definition for word principle.

Principle Prin"ci*ple, n. [F. principe, L. principium beginning, foundation, fr. princeps, -cipis. See Prince.] 1. Beginning; commencement. [Obs.] Doubting sad end of principle unsound. --Spenser. 2. A source, or origin; that from which anything proceeds; fundamental substance or energy; primordial substance; ultimate element, or cause.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for principle.

- a principle is a law or rule that has to be, or usually is to be followed, or can be desirably followed, or is an inevitable consequence
- the pauli exclusion principle is the quantum mechanical principle that no two identical fermions (particles with half-integer spin ) may
- in fluid dynamics , bernoulli's principle states that for an inviscid flow , an increase in the speed of the fluid occurs simultaneously
- in chemistry , le chatelier's principle, also called chatelier's principle or 'the equilibrium law', can be used to predict the effect of a
- in physics , the principle of least action – or, more accurately, the principle of stationary action – is a variational principle that,
- the pareto principle (also known as the 80–20 rule, the law of the vital few, and the principle of factor sparsity) states that, for many
- the huygens–fresnel principle (named after dutch physicist christiaan huygens and french physicist augustin-jean fresnel ) is a method
- in theoretical physics , particularly in discussions of category:theories of gravitation , gravitation theories , mach's principle (or
- the separation of powers, often imprecisely used interchangeably with the trias politica principle is a model for the governance of a
- in mathematics , helmut hasse 's local-global principle, also known as the hasse principle, is the idea that one can find an integer


We found definition for principle you search from dictionaries , wikipedia mentions for principle.

Similar meaning for word principle.



Help for word principle-doctrine-or-policy.

Let-alone Let"-a*lone" (l[e^]t"[.a]*l[=o]n"), a. Letting alone. The let-alone principle, doctrine, or policy. (Polit. Econ.) See Laissez faire.


Wiki for principle-doctrine-or-policy.

- the stimson doctrine is a policy of the united states federal government , the doctrine was an application of the principle of ex injuria
- the calvo doctrine is a foreign policy doctrine which holds that jurisdiction in doctrine is a narrower application of calvo's wider principle.
- the zhdanov doctrine (also called zhdanovism or zhdanovshchina headed by the soviet union the main principle of the zhdanov doctrine was
- leaders with commonly held doctrine , policy and worship without denominational structure as a matter of principle, holding that each
- delicto, though all of these doctrines have similar policy rationales. the same principle can be applied when neither party is at fault if
- the lesser of two evils principle (or lesser evil principle) is the idea in closely related to the kirkpatrick doctrine of jeane kirkpatrick .
- doctrine (from doctrina ) is a codification of beliefs or a body of teaching s or also used to refer to a principle of law, in the common
- strategic principle on which the atomic pakistan is based this doctrine is not a part of the surpassed instead, the policy of the minimum
- general principle is widely accepted, strength and scope of the doctrine. the president can control policy-making by all executive agencies
- in law , the doctrine of evasion is a fundamental public policy . it is also a common principle in conflict of laws . definition



Help for word Principle-of-contradiction.

Contradiction Con`tra*dic"tion, n. [L. contradictio answer, objection: cf. F. contradiction.] 1. An assertion of the contrary to what has been said or affirmed; denial of the truth of a statement or assertion; contrary declaration; gainsaying. His fair demands Shall be accomplished without contradiction. --Shak. 2. Direct opposition or repugnancy; inconsistency; incongruity or contrariety; one who, or that which, is inconsistent. can be make deathless death? That were to make Strange contradiction. --Milton. We state our experience and then we come to a manly resolution of acting in contradiction to it. --Burke. Both parts of a contradiction can not possibly be true. --Hobbes. Of contradictions infinite the slave. --Wordsworth. Principle of contradiction (Logic), the axiom or law of thought that a thing cannot be and not be at the same time, or a thing must either be or not be, or the same attribute can not at the same time be affirmed and and denied of the same subject. Note: It develops itself in three specific forms which have been called the ``Three Logical Axioms.' First, ``A is A.' Second, ``A is not Not-A' Third, ``Everything is either A or Not-A.'


Wiki for Principle-of-contradiction.

- contradiction (pm) or the principle of non-contradiction (pnc), or the principle of contradiction) is the second of the three classic laws of thought .
- therefore it has 'not nullified the principle of contradiction' and can become either good or evil, and whichever way is chosen, the '
- he thought innovatively about traditional propositional logic , the principle of non-contradiction and the law of excluded middle .
- in logic , the law of excluded middle (or the principle of excluded middle) is the between the two parts of a contradiction the principle
- reasoned decision the principles of equality of arms and the principle of contradiction the right to carry out the judge's decision b) serge
- the principle of explosion, (latin : ex falso quodlibet or ex contradictione sequitur quodlibet, 'from a contradiction, anything follows')
- the principle of inquisition is a form of criminal proceeding developed in italy, inquisition was replaced by a principle of contradiction .
- (and tradable) good is not accepted unanimously; especially human rights groups see this principle in contradiction to the right to water .
- article 'laws of thought'), the principle of contradiction is not sufficient to define contradictories; the principle of excluded middle
- the same principle must also hold in the case of the new birth. it would indeed be a ludicrous contradiction if an existing person asked



Help for word Principle-of-virtual-velocities.

Virtual Vir"tu*al (?; 135), a. [Cf. F. virtuel. See Virtue.] 1. Having the power of acting or of invisible efficacy without the agency of the material or sensible part; potential; energizing. Heat and cold have a virtual transition, without communication of substance. --Bacon. Every kind that lives, Fomented by his virtual power, and warmed. --Milton. 2. Being in essence or effect, not in fact; as, the virtual presence of a man in his agent or substitute. A thing has a virtual existence when it has all the conditions necessary to its actual existence. --Fleming. To mask by slight differences in the manners a virtual identity in the substance. --De Quincey. Principle of virtual velocities (Mech.), the law that when several forces are in equilibrium, the algebraic sum of their virtual moments is equal to zero. Virtual focus (Opt.), the point from which rays, having been rendered divergent by reflection of refraction, appear to issue; the point at which converging rays would meet if not reflected or refracted before they reach it. Virtual image. (Optics) See under Image. Virtual moment (of a force) (Mech.), the product of the intensity of the force multiplied by the virtual velocity of its point of application; -- sometimes called virtual work. Virtual velocity (Mech.), a minute hypothetical displacement, assumed in analysis to facilitate the investigation of statical problems. With respect to any given force of a number of forces holding a material system in equilibrium, it is the projection, upon the direction of the force, of a line joining its point of application with a new position of that point indefinitely near to the first, to which the point is conceived to have been moved, without disturbing the equilibrium of the system, or the connections of its parts with each other. Strictly speaking, it is not a velocity but a length. Virtual work. (Mech.) See Virtual moment, above.


Wiki for Principle-of-virtual-velocities.

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Help for word Principle-of-vis-viva.

Vis Vis, n. 1. Force; power. 2. (Law) (a) Physical force. (b) Moral power. Principle of vis viva (Mech.), the principle that the difference between the aggregate work of the accelerating forces of a system and that of the retarding forces is equal to one half the vis viva accumulated or lost in the system while the work is being done. Vis impressa [L.] (Mech.), force exerted, as in moving a body, or changing the direction of its motion; impressed force. Vis inerti[ae]. [L.] (a) The resistance of matter, as when a body at rest is set in motion, or a body in motion is brought to rest, or has its motion changed, either in direction or in velocity. (b) Inertness; inactivity. Note: Vis interti[ae] and inertia are not strictly synonymous. The former implies the resistance itself which is given, while the latter implies merely the property by which it is given. Vis mortua [L.] (Mech.), dead force; force doing no active work, but only producing pressure. Vis vit[ae], or Vis vitalis [L.] (Physiol.), vital force. Vis viva [L.] (Mech.), living force; the force of a body moving against resistance, or doing work, in distinction from vis mortua, or dead force; the kinetic energy of a moving body; the capacity of a moving body to do work by reason of its being in motion. See Kinetic energy, in the Note under Energy. The term vis viva is not usually understood to include that part of the kinetic energy of the body which is due to the vibrations of its molecules.


Wiki for Principle-of-vis-viva.

- the vis viva regarding consciousness in relation to the principle of continuity can be seen as an early theory regarding the stages of sleep.
- in the history of science , vis viva (from the latin for early formulation of the principle of conservation of description of what we now
- in astrodynamics , the vis viva equation, also referred to as orbital energy it represents the principle that the difference between the
- 1805, on the force of percussion, to defend gottfried leibniz 's principle of vis viva , an early formulation of the conservation of energy .
- reviewed the two competing theories of vis viva and caloric theory the position momentum uncertainty principle, and merely holds in
- the principle in classical mechanics that e ∝ mv² was described kinetic energy as the living force, vis viva . willem 's gravesande of the
- was to come to associate heat with motion , there is no evidence that he was committed to the kinetic theory or the principle of vis viva .
- of hydrodynamic pressure and discovered the role of loss of vis viva in fluid flow, which would later be known as the bernoulli principle .
- bernoulli made a connection with gottfried leibniz 's vis viva principle, an early formulation of the principle of conservation of energy
- through this book that hutton's principle of uniformitarianism , later playfair was an opponent of gottfried leibniz 's vis viva principle



Help for word principled.

Bitter Bit"ter, a. [AS. biter; akin to Goth. baitrs, Icel. bitr, Dan., Sw., D., & G. bitter, OS. bittar, fr. root of E. bite. See Bite, v. t.] 1. Having a peculiar, acrid, biting taste, like that of wormwood or an infusion of hops; as, a bitter medicine; bitter as aloes. 2. Causing pain or smart; piercing; painful; sharp; severe; as, a bitter cold day. 3. Causing, or fitted to cause, pain or distress to the mind; calamitous; poignant. It is an evil thing and bitter, that thou hast forsaken the Lord thy God. --Jer. ii. 19. 4. Characterized by sharpness, severity, or cruelty; harsh; stern; virulent; as, bitter reproach. Husbands, love your wives, and be not bitter against them. --Col. iii. 19. 5. Mournful; sad; distressing; painful; pitiable. The Egyptians . . . made their lives bitter with hard bondage. --Ex. i. 14. Bitter apple, Bitter cucumber, Bitter gourd. (Bot.) See Colocynth. Bitter cress (Bot.), a plant of the genus Cardamine, esp. C. amara. Bitter earth (Min.), tale earth; calcined magnesia. Bitter principles (Chem.), a class of substances, extracted from vegetable products, having strong bitter taste but with no sharply defined chemical characteristics. Bitter salt, Epsom salts; magnesium sulphate. Bitter vetch (Bot.), a name given to two European leguminous herbs, Vicia Orobus and Ervum Ervilia. To the bitter end, to the last extremity, however calamitous. Syn: Acrid; sharp; harsh; pungent; stinging; cutting; severe; acrimonious., Extract Ex"tract`, n. 1. That which is extracted or drawn out. 2. A portion of a book or document, separately transcribed; a citation; a quotation. 3. A decoction, solution, or infusion made by drawing out from any substance that which gives it its essential and characteristic virtue; essence; as, extract of beef; extract of dandelion; also, any substance so extracted, and characteristic of that from which it is obtained; as, quinine is the most important extract of Peruvian bark. 4. (Med.) A solid preparation obtained by evaporating a solution of a drug, etc., or the fresh juice of a plant; -- distinguished from an abstract. See Abstract, n., 4. 5. (Old Chem.) A peculiar principle once erroneously supposed to form the basis of all vegetable extracts; -- called also the extractive principle. [Obs.] 6. Extraction; descent. [Obs.] --South. 7. (Scots Law) A draught or copy of writing; certified copy of the proceedings in an action and the judgement therein, with an order for execution. --Tomlins. Fluid extract (Med.), a concentrated liquid preparation, containing a definite proportion of the active principles of a medicinal substance. At present a fluid gram of extract should represent a gram of the crude drug., High-principled High"-prin`ci*pled, a. Possessed of noble or honorable principles., Spirit Spir"it, n. [OF. espirit, esperit, F. esprit, L. spiritus, from spirare to breathe, to blow. Cf. Conspire, Expire, Esprit, Sprite.] 1. Air set in motion by breathing; breath; hence, sometimes, life itself. [Obs.] ``All of spirit would deprive.' --Spenser. The mild air, with season moderate, Gently attempered, and disposed eo well, That still it breathed foorth sweet spirit. --Spenser. 2. A rough breathing; an aspirate, as the letter h; also, a mark to denote aspiration; a breathing. [Obs.] Be it a letter or spirit, we have great use for it. --B. Jonson. 3. Life, or living substance, considered independently of corporeal existence; an intelligence conceived of apart from any physical organization or embodiment; vital essence, force, or energy, as distinct from matter. 4. The intelligent, immaterial and immortal part of man; the soul, in distinction from the body in which it resides; the agent or subject of vital and spiritual functions, whether spiritual or material. There is a spirit in man; and the inspiration of the Almighty giveth them understanding. --Job xxxii. 8. As the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also. --James ii. 26. Spirit is a substance wherein thinking, knowing, doubting, and a power of moving, do subsist. --Locke. 5. Specifically, a disembodied soul; the human soul after it has left the body. Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was, and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it. --Eccl. xii. 7. Ye gentle spirits far away, With whom we shared the cup of grace. --Keble. 6. Any supernatural being, good or bad; an apparition; a specter; a ghost; also, sometimes, a sprite,; a fairy; an elf. Whilst young, preserve his tender mind from all impressions of spirits and goblins in the dark. --Locke. 7. Energy, vivacity, ardor, enthusiasm, courage, etc. ``Write it then, quickly,' replied Bede; and summoning all his spirits together, like the last blaze of a candle going out, he indited it, and expired. --Fuller. 8. One who is vivacious or lively; one who evinces great activity or peculiar characteristics of mind or temper; as, a ruling spirit; a schismatic spirit. Such spirits as he desired to please, such would I choose for my judges. --Dryden. 9. Temper or disposition of mind; mental condition or disposition; intellectual or moral state; -- often in the plural; as, to be cheerful, or in good spirits; to be downhearted, or in bad spirits. God has . . . made a spirit of building succeed a spirit of pulling down. --South. A perfect judge will read each work of wit With the same spirit that its author writ. --Pope. 10. Intent; real meaning; -- opposed to the letter, or to formal statement; also, characteristic quality, especially such as is derived from the individual genius or the personal character; as, the spirit of an enterprise, of a document, or the like. 11. Tenuous, volatile, airy, or vapory substance, possessed of active qualities. All bodies have spirits . . . within them. --Bacon. 12. Any liquid produced by distillation; especially, alcohol, the spirits, or spirit, of wine (it having been first distilled from wine): -- often in the plural. 13. pl. Rum, whisky, brandy, gin, and other distilled liquors having much alcohol, in distinction from wine and malt liquors. 14. (Med.) A solution in alcohol of a volatile principle. Cf. Tincture. --U. S. Disp. 15. (Alchemy) Any one of the four substances, sulphur, sal ammoniac, quicksilver, or arsenic (or, according to some, orpiment). The four spirits and the bodies seven. --Chaucer. 16. (Dyeing) Stannic chloride. See under Stannic. Note: Spirit is sometimes joined with other words, forming compounds, generally of obvious signification; as, spirit-moving, spirit-searching, spirit-stirring, etc. Astral spirits, Familiar spirits, etc. See under Astral, Familiar, etc. Animal spirits. (a) (Physiol.) The fluid which at one time was supposed to circulate through the nerves and was regarded as the agent of sensation and motion; -- called also the nervous fluid, or nervous principle. (b) Physical health and energy; frolicsomeness; sportiveness. Ardent spirits, strong alcoholic liquors, as brandy, rum, whisky, etc., obtained by distillation. Holy Spirit, or The Spirit (Theol.), the Spirit of God, or the third person of the Trinity; the Holy Ghost. The spirit also signifies the human spirit as influenced or animated by the Divine Spirit. Proof spirit. (Chem.) See under Proof. Rectified spirit (Chem.), spirit rendered purer or more concentrated by redistillation, so as to increase the percentage of absolute alcohol. Spirit butterfly (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of delicate butterflies of tropical America belonging to the genus Ithomia. The wings are gauzy and nearly destitute of scales. Spirit duck. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The buffle-headed duck. (b) The golden-eye. Spirit lamp (Art), a lamp in which alcohol or methylated spirit is burned. Spirit level. See under Level. Spirit of hartshorn. (Old Chem.) See under Hartshorn. Spirit of Mindererus (Med.), an aqueous solution of acetate of ammonium; -- named after R. Minderer, physician of Augsburg. Spirit of nitrous ether (Med. Chem.), a pale yellow liquid, of a sweetish taste and a pleasant ethereal odor. It is obtained by the distillation of alcohol with nitric and sulphuric acids, and consists essentially of ethyl nitrite with a little acetic aldehyde. It is used as a diaphoretic, diuretic, antispasmodic, etc. Called also sweet spirit of niter. Spirit of salt (Chem.), hydrochloric acid; -- so called because obtained from salt and sulphuric acid. [Obs.] Spirit of sense, the utmost refinement of sensation. [Obs.] --Shak. Spirits, or Spirit, of turpentine (Chem.), rectified oil of turpentine, a transparent, colorless, volatile, and very inflammable liquid, distilled from the turpentine of the various species of pine; camphine. See Camphine. Spirit of vitriol (Chem.), sulphuric acid; -- so called because formerly obtained by the distillation of green vitriol. [Obs.] Spirit of vitriolic ether (Chem.) ether; -- often but incorrectly called sulphuric ether. See Ether. [Obs.] Spirits, or Spirit, of wine (Chem.), alcohol; -- so called because formerly obtained by the distillation of wine. Spirit rapper, one who practices spirit rapping; a ``medium' so called. Spirit rapping, an alleged form of communication with the spirits of the dead by raps. See Spiritualism, 3. Sweet spirit of niter. See Spirit of nitrous ether, above., Principle Prin"ci*ple, n. [F. principe, L. principium beginning, foundation, fr. princeps, -cipis. See Prince.] 1. Beginning; commencement. [Obs.] Doubting sad end of principle unsound. --Spenser. 2. A source, or origin; that from which anything proceeds; fundamental substance or energy; primordial substance; ultimate element, or cause., Let-alone Let"-a*lone" (l[e^]t"[.a]*l[=o]n"), a. Letting alone. The let-alone principle, doctrine, or policy. (Polit. Econ.) See Laissez faire., Contradiction Con`tra*dic"tion, n. [L. contradictio answer, objection: cf. F. contradiction.] 1. An assertion of the contrary to what has been said or affirmed; denial of the truth of a statement or assertion; contrary declaration; gainsaying. His fair demands Shall be accomplished without contradiction. --Shak. 2. Direct opposition or repugnancy; inconsistency; incongruity or contrariety; one who, or that which, is inconsistent. can be make deathless death? That were to make Strange contradiction. --Milton. We state our experience and then we come to a manly resolution of acting in contradiction to it. --Burke. Both parts of a contradiction can not possibly be true. --Hobbes. Of contradictions infinite the slave. --Wordsworth. Principle of contradiction (Logic), the axiom or law of thought that a thing cannot be and not be at the same time, or a thing must either be or not be, or the same attribute can not at the same time be affirmed and and denied of the same subject. Note: It develops itself in three specific forms which have been called the ``Three Logical Axioms.' First, ``A is A.' Second, ``A is not Not-A' Third, ``Everything is either A or Not-A.', Virtual Vir"tu*al (?; 135), a. [Cf. F. virtuel. See Virtue.] 1. Having the power of acting or of invisible efficacy without the agency of the material or sensible part; potential; energizing. Heat and cold have a virtual transition, without communication of substance. --Bacon. Every kind that lives, Fomented by his virtual power, and warmed. --Milton. 2. Being in essence or effect, not in fact; as, the virtual presence of a man in his agent or substitute. A thing has a virtual existence when it has all the conditions necessary to its actual existence. --Fleming. To mask by slight differences in the manners a virtual identity in the substance. --De Quincey. Principle of virtual velocities (Mech.), the law that when several forces are in equilibrium, the algebraic sum of their virtual moments is equal to zero. Virtual focus (Opt.), the point from which rays, having been rendered divergent by reflection of refraction, appear to issue; the point at which converging rays would meet if not reflected or refracted before they reach it. Virtual image. (Optics) See under Image. Virtual moment (of a force) (Mech.), the product of the intensity of the force multiplied by the virtual velocity of its point of application; -- sometimes called virtual work. Virtual velocity (Mech.), a minute hypothetical displacement, assumed in analysis to facilitate the investigation of statical problems. With respect to any given force of a number of forces holding a material system in equilibrium, it is the projection, upon the direction of the force, of a line joining its point of application with a new position of that point indefinitely near to the first, to which the point is conceived to have been moved, without disturbing the equilibrium of the system, or the connections of its parts with each other. Strictly speaking, it is not a velocity but a length. Virtual work. (Mech.) See Virtual moment, above., Vis Vis, n. 1. Force; power. 2. (Law) (a) Physical force. (b) Moral power. Principle of vis viva (Mech.), the principle that the difference between the aggregate work of the accelerating forces of a system and that of the retarding forces is equal to one half the vis viva accumulated or lost in the system while the work is being done. Vis impressa [L.] (Mech.), force exerted, as in moving a body, or changing the direction of its motion; impressed force. Vis inerti[ae]. [L.] (a) The resistance of matter, as when a body at rest is set in motion, or a body in motion is brought to rest, or has its motion changed, either in direction or in velocity. (b) Inertness; inactivity. Note: Vis interti[ae] and inertia are not strictly synonymous. The former implies the resistance itself which is given, while the latter implies merely the property by which it is given. Vis mortua [L.] (Mech.), dead force; force doing no active work, but only producing pressure. Vis vit[ae], or Vis vitalis [L.] (Physiol.), vital force. Vis viva [L.] (Mech.), living force; the force of a body moving against resistance, or doing work, in distinction from vis mortua, or dead force; the kinetic energy of a moving body; the capacity of a moving body to do work by reason of its being in motion. See Kinetic energy, in the Note under Energy. The term vis viva is not usually understood to include that part of the kinetic energy of the body which is due to the vibrations of its molecules., Proximate Prox"i*mate, a. [L. proximatus, p. p. of proximare to come near, to approach, fr. proximus the nearest, nest, superl. of propior nearer, and prope, adv., near.] Nearest; next immediately preceding or following. ``Proximate ancestors.' --J. S. Harford. The proximate natural causes of it [the deluge]. --T. Burnet. Proximate analysis (Chem.), an analysis which determines the proximate principles of any substance, as contrasted with an ultimate analysis. Proximate cause. (a) A cause which immediately precedes and produces the effect, as distinguished from the remote, mediate, or predisposing cause. --I. Watts. (b) That which in ordinary natural sequence produces a specific result, no independent disturbing agencies intervening. Proximate principle (Physiol. Chem.), one of a class of bodies existing ready formed in animal and vegetable tissues, and separable by chemical analysis, as albumin, sugar, collagen, fat, etc. Syn: Nearest; next; closest; immediate; direct., Unprinciple Un*prin"ci*ple, v. t. [1st pref. un- + principle.] To destroy the moral principles of. [R.], Unprincipled Un*prin"ci*pled, a. [Pref. un- not + principled.] Being without principles; especially, being without right moral principles; also, characterized by absence of principle. -- Un*prin"ci*pled*ness, n., Unprincipled Un*prin"ci*pled, a. [Pref. un- not + principled.] Being without principles; especially, being without right moral principles; also, characterized by absence of principle. -- Un*prin"ci*pled*ness, n., Vital Vi"tal, a. [F., fr. L. vitalis, fr. vita life; akin to vivere to live. See Vivid.] 1. Belonging or relating to life, either animal or vegetable; as, vital energies; vital functions; vital actions. 2. Contributing to life; necessary to, or supporting, life; as, vital blood. Do the heavens afford him vital food? --Spenser. And vital virtue infused, and vital warmth. --Milton. 3. Containing life; living. ``Spirits that live throughout, vital in every part.' --Milton. 4. Being the seat of life; being that on which life depends; mortal. The dart flew on, and pierced a vital part. --Pope. 5. Very necessary; highly important; essential. A competence is vital to content. --Young. 6. Capable of living; in a state to live; viable. [R.] Pythagoras and Hippocrates . . . affirm the birth of the seventh month to be vital. --Sir T. Browne. Vital air, oxygen gas; -- so called because essential to animal life. [Obs.] Vital capacity (Physiol.), the breathing capacity of the lungs; -- expressed by the number of cubic inches of air which can be forcibly exhaled after a full inspiration. Vital force. (Biol.) See under Force. The vital forces, according to Cope, are nerve force (neurism), growth force (bathmism), and thought force (phrenism), all under the direction and control of the vital principle. Apart from the phenomena of consciousness, vital actions no longer need to be considered as of a mysterious and unfathomable character, nor vital force as anything other than a form of physical energy derived from, and convertible into, other well-known forces of nature. Vital functions (Physiol.), those functions or actions of the body on which life is directly dependent, as the circulation of the blood, digestion, etc. Vital principle, an immaterial force, to which the functions peculiar to living beings are ascribed. Vital statistics, statistics respecting the duration of life, and the circumstances affecting its duration. Vital tripod. (Physiol.) See under Tripod. Vital vessels (Bot.), a name for latex tubes, now disused. See Latex.


Wiki for principled.

- 1 http://www. iranmania. com/news/articleview/default. asp? newscode 44959&newskind currentaffairs: triggered by \biranmania\.com\b on the local
- advocates for principlism argue that from the beginning of recorded history most moral decision-makers descriptively and prescriptively
- research ethics in a medical context is dominated by principlism , an approach that has been criticised as being decontextualised
- references : edu/language/principl/principl. htm , title art, design, and visual thinking: principles of design url http://goshen.
- (egoism), to ultimately benefit the other person (altruism), to benefit a group (collectivism), or to uphold a moral principle (principlism ).
- external links : org/topics/principl. htm the principles of the naqshbandi way at naqshbandi. org (the first eight principles) category:sufism
- this index of ethics articles puts articles relevant to well-known ethical (right and wrong, good and bad) debates and decisions in one
- lb/en/themes/arts/painting/principl-tech/paint-instruct/class-oil-paint/classoilpaint. htm , title classical oil painting technique ,
- basis of the beauchamp/childress work is principlism , an ethical framework that uses principles as the foundation for ethical decision making .
- clinical ethics support services initially developed in the united states of america, following court cases such as the karen quinlan case
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Help for word principles.

Principle Prin"ci*ple, n. [F. principe, L. principium beginning, foundation, fr. princeps, -cipis. See Prince.] 1. Beginning; commencement. [Obs.] Doubting sad end of principle unsound. --Spenser. 2. A source, or origin; that from which anything proceeds; fundamental substance or energy; primordial substance; ultimate element, or cause.


Wiki for principles.

- a principle is a law or rule that has to be, or usually is to be followed, or can be desirably followed, or is an inevitable consequence
- the pauli exclusion principle is the quantum mechanical principle that no two identical fermions (particles with half-integer spin ) may
- in fluid dynamics , bernoulli's principle states that for an inviscid flow , an increase in the speed of the fluid occurs simultaneously
- in chemistry , le chatelier's principle, also called chatelier's principle or 'the equilibrium law', can be used to predict the effect of a
- in physics , the principle of least action – or, more accurately, the principle of stationary action – is a variational principle that,
- the pareto principle (also known as the 80–20 rule, the law of the vital few, and the principle of factor sparsity) states that, for many
- the huygens–fresnel principle (named after dutch physicist christiaan huygens and french physicist augustin-jean fresnel ) is a method
- in theoretical physics , particularly in discussions of category:theories of gravitation , gravitation theories , mach's principle (or
- the separation of powers, often imprecisely used interchangeably with the trias politica principle is a model for the governance of a
- in mathematics , helmut hasse 's local-global principle, also known as the hasse principle, is the idea that one can find an integer