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Discretive Dis*cre"tive, a. [L. discretivus. See Discrete.] Marking distinction or separation; disjunctive. Discretive proposition (Logic & Gram.), one that expresses distinction, opposition, or variety, by means of discretive particles, as but, though, yet, etc.; as, travelers change their climate, but not their temper.

Disjunctive Dis*junc"tive, a. [L. disjunctivus: cf. F. disjonctif.] 1. Tending to disjoin; separating; disjoining. 2. (Mus.) Pertaining to disjunct tetrachords. ``Disjunctive notes.' -Moore (Encyc. of Music). Disjunctive conjunction (Gram.), one connecting grammatically two words or clauses, expressing at the same time an opposition or separation inherent in the notions or thoughts; as, either, or, neither, nor, but, although, except, lest, etc. Disjunctive proposition, one in which the parts are connected by disjunctive conjunctions; as it is either day or night. Disjunctive syllogism (Logic), one in which the major proposition is disjunctive; as, the earth moves in a circle or an ellipse; but in does not move in a circle, therefore it moves in an ellipse.

Indefinite In*def"i*nite, a. [L. indefinitus. See In not, and Definite.] 1. Not definite; not limited, defined, or specified; not explicit; not determined or fixed upon; not precise; uncertain; vague; confused; obscure; as, an indefinite time, plan, etc. It were to be wished that . . . men would leave off that indefinite way of vouching, ``the chymists say this,' or ``the chymists affirm that.' -Boyle. The time of this last is left indefinite. -Dryden. 2. Having no determined or certain limits; large and unmeasured, though not infinite; unlimited; as indefinite space; the indefinite extension of a straight line. Though it is not infinite, it may be indefinite; though it is not boundless in itself, it may be so to human comprehension. -Spectator. 3. Boundless; infinite. [R.] Indefinite and omnipresent God, Inhabiting eternity. -W. Thompson (1745). 4. (Bot.) Too numerous or variable to make a particular enumeration important; - said of the parts of a flower, and the like. Also, indeterminate. Indefinite article (Gram.), the word a or an, used with nouns to denote any one of a common or general class. Indefinite inflorescence. (Bot.) See Indeterminate inflorescence, under Indeterminate. Indefinite proposition (Logic), a statement whose subject is a common term, with nothing to indicate distribution or nondistribution; as, Man is mortal. Indefinite term (Logic), a negative term; as, the not good. Syn: Inexplicit; vague; uncertain; unsettled; indeterminate; loose; equivocal; inexact; approximate.

Proposition Prop`o*si"tion, n. [L. propositio: cf. F. proposition. See Propound.] 1. The act of setting or placing before; the act of offering. ``Oblations for the altar of proposition.' -Jer. Taylor. 2. That which is proposed; that which is offered, as for consideration, acceptance, or adoption; a proposal; as, the enemy made propositions of peace; his proposition was not accepted. 3. A statement of religious doctrine; an article of faith; creed; as, the propositions of Wyclif and Huss. Some persons . . . change their propositions according as their temporal necessities or advantages do turn. -Jer. Taylor. 4. (Gram. & Logic) A complete sentence, or part of a sentence consisting of a subject and predicate united by a copula; a thought expressed or propounded in language; a from of speech in which a predicate is affirmed or denied of a subject; as, snow is white. 5. (Math.) A statement in terms of a truth to be demonstrated, or of an operation to be performed. Note: It is called a theorem when it is something to be proved, and a problem when it is something to be done. 6. (Rhet.) That which is offered or affirmed as the subject of the discourse; anything stated or affirmed for discussion or illustration. 7. (Poetry) The part of a poem in which the author states the subject or matter of it. Leaves of proposition (Jewish Antiq.), the showbread. -Wyclif (Luke vi. 4). Syn: Proposal; offer; statement; declaration. Usage: Proposition, Proposal. These words are both from the Latin verb proponere, to set forth, and as here compared they mark different forms or stages of a negotiation. A proposition is something presented for discussion or consideration; as, propositions of peace. A proposal is some definite thing offered by one party to be accepted or rejected by the other. If the proposition is favorably received, it is usually followed by proposals which complete the arrangement.

Malapropos Mal*ap"ro*pos`, a. & adv. [F. mal [`a] propos; mal evil + [`a] propos to the purpose.] Unseasonable or unseasonably; unsuitable or unsuitably.

Proposal Pro*pos"al, n. [From Propose.] 1. That which is proposed, or propounded for consideration or acceptance; a scheme or design; terms or conditions proposed; offer; as, to make proposals for a treaty of peace; to offer proposals for erecting a building; to make proposals of marriage. ``To put forth proposals for a book.' -Macaulay. 2. (Law) The offer by a party of what he has in view as to an intended business transaction, which, with acceptance, constitutes a contract. Syn: Proffer; tender; overture. See Proposition.

Propose Pro*pose", n. [F. propos, L. propositum. See Propound, Purpose, n.] Talk; discourse. [Obs.] -Shak.

Proposer Pro*pos"er, n. 1. One who proposes or offers anything for consideration or adoption. 2. A speaker; an orator. [Obs.] -Shak.

Proposition Prop`o*si"tion, n. [L. propositio: cf. F. proposition. See Propound.] 1. The act of setting or placing before; the act of offering. ``Oblations for the altar of proposition.' -Jer. Taylor. 2. That which is proposed; that which is offered, as for consideration, acceptance, or adoption; a proposal; as, the enemy made propositions of peace; his proposition was not accepted. 3. A statement of religious doctrine; an article of faith; creed; as, the propositions of Wyclif and Huss. Some persons . . . change their propositions according as their temporal necessities or advantages do turn. -Jer. Taylor. 4. (Gram. & Logic) A complete sentence, or part of a sentence consisting of a subject and predicate united by a copula; a thought expressed or propounded in language; a from of speech in which a predicate is affirmed or denied of a subject; as, snow is white. 5. (Math.) A statement in terms of a truth to be demonstrated, or of an operation to be performed. Note: It is called a theorem when it is something to be proved, and a problem when it is something to be done. 6. (Rhet.) That which is offered or affirmed as the subject of the discourse; anything stated or affirmed for discussion or illustration. 7. (Poetry) The part of a poem in which the author states the subject or matter of it. Leaves of proposition (Jewish Antiq.), the showbread. -Wyclif (Luke vi. 4). Syn: Proposal; offer; statement; declaration. Usage: Proposition, Proposal. These words are both from the Latin verb proponere, to set forth, and as here compared they mark different forms or stages of a negotiation. A proposition is something presented for discussion or consideration; as, propositions of peace. A proposal is some definite thing offered by one party to be accepted or rejected by the other. If the proposition is favorably received, it is usually followed by proposals which complete the arrangement.

Propositional Prop`o*si"tion*al, a. Pertaining to, or in the nature of, a proposition; considered as a proposition; as, a propositional sense. -I. Watts.

Pythagorean Pyth`a*go"re*an, a. [L. Pythagoreus, Gr. ?.] Of or pertaining to Pythagoras (a Greek philosopher, born about 582 b. c.), or his philosophy. The central thought of the Pythagorean philosophy is the idea of number, the recognition of the numerical and mathematical relations of things. -Encyc. Brit. Pythagorean proposition (Geom.), the theorem that the square described upon the hypothenuse of a plane right angled triangle is equal to the sum of the squares described upon the other two sides.

Explination we found from Wikipedia

- prophenoloxidase (propo) is a modified form of the complement response found in some invertebrates, including insect s, crab s and worm s
- À propos de nice is a 1930 silent short documentary film directed by jean vigo and photographed by boris kaufman . the film depicts
- petits propos culinaires is a journal of the history of food and cookery. founded by alan davidson in 1979, it is now edited by tom jaine
- À propos is a canadian radio program that presents french language music for english audiences. musician, À propos began in november 1988.
- À propos de sarajevo is a name of a documentary written and directed by haris pašović it is the story about a sarajevo festival led by
- ko propo is a manufacturer of radio control equipment and humanoid robot khr-1 , established in tokyo , japan in 1945. external links
- (commonly called saurce propo, source racing, or hum) is a japan ese manufacturer unique to jr propo's radios is the company's patented
- name a letter to freddy buache , image , caption , director jean-luc godard , producer , writer jean-luc godard , narrator jean-luc
- published in the first issue of the food history journal, petits propos culinaires , in 1979 speakers included kai brodersen , then at st
- in 1979 davidson was alistair horne research fellow at st antony's college, oxford in that same year he began to edit petits propos

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