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Definition for word roman.

Roman Ro"man, a. [L. Romanus, fr. Roma Rome: cf. F. romain. Cf. Romaic, Romance, Romantic.] 1. Of or pertaining to Rome, or the Roman people; like or characteristic of Rome, the Roman people, or things done by Romans; as, Roman fortitude; a Roman aqueduct; Roman art. 2. Of or pertaining to the Roman Catholic religion; professing that religion. 3. (Print.) (a) Upright; erect; -- said of the letters or kind of type ordinarily used, as distinguished from Italic characters. (b) Expressed in letters, not in figures, as I., IV., i., iv., etc.; -- said of numerals, as distinguished from the Arabic numerals, 1, 4, etc. Roman alum (Chem.), a cubical potassium alum formerly obtained in large quantities from Italian alunite, and highly valued by dyers on account of its freedom from iron. Roman balance, a form of balance nearly resembling the modern steelyard. See the Note under Balance, n., 1. Roman candle, a kind of firework (generally held in the hand), characterized by the continued emission of shower of sparks, and the ejection, at intervals, of brilliant balls or stars of fire which are thrown upward as they become ignited. Roman Catholic, of, pertaining to, or the religion of that church of which the pope is the spiritual head; as, a Roman Catholic priest; the Roman Catholic Church. Roman cement, a cement having the property of hardening under water; a species of hydraulic cement. Roman law. See under Law. Roman nose, a nose somewhat aquiline. Roman ocher, a deep, rich orange color, transparent and durable, used by artists. --Ure. Roman order (Arch.), the composite order. See Composite, a., 2., Roman Ro"man, n. 1. A native, or permanent resident, of Rome; a citizen of Rome, or one upon whom certain rights and privileges of a Roman citizen were conferred. 2. Roman type, letters, or print, collectively; -- in distinction from Italics., Composite Com*pos"ite (?; 277), a. [L. compositus made up of parts, p. p. of componere. See Compound, v. t., and cf. Compost.] 1. Made up of distinct parts or elements; compounded; as, a composite language. Happiness, like air and water . . . is composite. --Landor. 2. (Arch.) Belonging to a certain order which is composed of the Ionic order grafted upon the Corinthian. It is called also the Roman or the Italic order, and is one of the five orders recognized by the Italian writers of the sixteenth century. See Capital.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for roman.

- roman or romans may refer to: a thing or person of or from the city of rome history : ancient rome (9th century bc – 5th century ad)
- romanian. romanian may refer to: anything of, from, or related to the country and nation of romania romanians , an ethnic group
- the roman empire (imperium romanum) was the post- republican period of the ancient roman civilization , characterised by an autocratic
- the romans gradually subdued the other peoples on the italian peninsula, including the etruscans the last threat to roman hegemony in
- today known as roman britain, was a province of the roman empire from 43 to 409, spanning at its height in 160, the southern three-
- the roman republic (res pvblica romana) was the period of the ancient roman civilization when the government operated as a republic .
- the catholic church, also known as the roman catholic church, is the world's largest christian church , with 1.2 billion members.
- the byzantine empire was the predominantly greek -speaking continuation of the roman empire during late antiquity and the middle ages .
- differences ), in linguistics , is the conversion of writing from a different writing system to the roman (latin) script , or a system for doing so.
- roman mythology is the body of traditional stories pertaining to ancient rome 's legendary origins and religious system , as represented


We found definition for roman you search from dictionaries , wikipedia mentions for roman.

Similar meaning for word roman.



Help for word Roman-alum.

Roman Ro"man, a. [L. Romanus, fr. Roma Rome: cf. F. romain. Cf. Romaic, Romance, Romantic.] 1. Of or pertaining to Rome, or the Roman people; like or characteristic of Rome, the Roman people, or things done by Romans; as, Roman fortitude; a Roman aqueduct; Roman art. 2. Of or pertaining to the Roman Catholic religion; professing that religion. 3. (Print.) (a) Upright; erect; -- said of the letters or kind of type ordinarily used, as distinguished from Italic characters. (b) Expressed in letters, not in figures, as I., IV., i., iv., etc.; -- said of numerals, as distinguished from the Arabic numerals, 1, 4, etc. Roman alum (Chem.), a cubical potassium alum formerly obtained in large quantities from Italian alunite, and highly valued by dyers on account of its freedom from iron. Roman balance, a form of balance nearly resembling the modern steelyard. See the Note under Balance, n., 1. Roman candle, a kind of firework (generally held in the hand), characterized by the continued emission of shower of sparks, and the ejection, at intervals, of brilliant balls or stars of fire which are thrown upward as they become ignited. Roman Catholic, of, pertaining to, or the religion of that church of which the pope is the spiritual head; as, a Roman Catholic priest; the Roman Catholic Church. Roman cement, a cement having the property of hardening under water; a species of hydraulic cement. Roman law. See under Law. Roman nose, a nose somewhat aquiline. Roman ocher, a deep, rich orange color, transparent and durable, used by artists. --Ure. Roman order (Arch.), the composite order. See Composite, a., 2.


Wiki for Roman-alum.

- alum ˈ , æ , l , əm is both a specific chemical compound and a class of chemical namely, roman alum, levant alum, british alum and alum
- cloth was sold in spain which also provided wool, and the medici family made rouen into the main port for the resale of roman alum.
- jet and alum were mined locally, and whitby jet, which was mined by the romans and victorians became fashionable during the 19th century.
- alexander acha is also a pianist and a berklee college of music alum. he was raised as a devout roman catholic and he still attends the
- roman technology is the engineering practice which supported roman civilization and alum , the production of alum (kal(so 4)2 .12h 2 o)
- the romans had two main ways of tanning, one of which was of tanning, especially by soaking it in a solution of alum and salt.
- alum cartel: alum was a vital commodity because of its many uses and relatively few sources. roman branch: the rome branch of the medici bank
- it is located in the roman catholic diocese of wichita . 25 alums are in the seminary, 20 for the diocese of wichita, making up about 1/3
- katherine trying to find her place in her roman catholic private school . snl and the kids in the hall alum mark mckinney , who appeared
- the romans pasted soft leather patches of alum directly over blemishes to pretend that they were beauty marks. criminals and freedmen



Help for word Roman-balance.

Roman Ro"man, a. [L. Romanus, fr. Roma Rome: cf. F. romain. Cf. Romaic, Romance, Romantic.] 1. Of or pertaining to Rome, or the Roman people; like or characteristic of Rome, the Roman people, or things done by Romans; as, Roman fortitude; a Roman aqueduct; Roman art. 2. Of or pertaining to the Roman Catholic religion; professing that religion. 3. (Print.) (a) Upright; erect; -- said of the letters or kind of type ordinarily used, as distinguished from Italic characters. (b) Expressed in letters, not in figures, as I., IV., i., iv., etc.; -- said of numerals, as distinguished from the Arabic numerals, 1, 4, etc. Roman alum (Chem.), a cubical potassium alum formerly obtained in large quantities from Italian alunite, and highly valued by dyers on account of its freedom from iron. Roman balance, a form of balance nearly resembling the modern steelyard. See the Note under Balance, n., 1. Roman candle, a kind of firework (generally held in the hand), characterized by the continued emission of shower of sparks, and the ejection, at intervals, of brilliant balls or stars of fire which are thrown upward as they become ignited. Roman Catholic, of, pertaining to, or the religion of that church of which the pope is the spiritual head; as, a Roman Catholic priest; the Roman Catholic Church. Roman cement, a cement having the property of hardening under water; a species of hydraulic cement. Roman law. See under Law. Roman nose, a nose somewhat aquiline. Roman ocher, a deep, rich orange color, transparent and durable, used by artists. --Ure. Roman order (Arch.), the composite order. See Composite, a., 2.


Wiki for Roman-balance.

- a steelyard balance or steelyard is a straight-beam balance with arms of unequal a steelyard is also known as a roman steelyard, or roman
- the roman republic (res pvblica romana) was the period of the ancient roman principles of a separation of powers and checks and balances .
- members of their families with the divinely sanctioned authority of the roman state . was expected to balance the interests of the roman
- the roman magistrates were elected officials in ancient rome . the constitutional balance of power shifted from the executive (the roman
- the senate of the roman empire was a political institution in the ancient roman the constitutional balance of power shifted from the '
- the executive magistrates of the roman empire were elected individuals of the the constitutional balance of power shifted from the
- through precedent after the fall of the roman republic , the constitutional balance of power shifted from the roman senate to the roman emperor .
- battled it out even though they all were inside the holy roman empire . changing the relative balance of power within the empire was at
- the roman constitution was an uncodified set of guidelines and principles passed examples include checks and balances, the separation of
- rome , a show about the fall of the roman republic and the rise of the roman empire . who struggles to balance his personal beliefs, his



Help for word Roman-calendar.

Roman calendar Roman calendar The calendar of the ancient Romans, from which our modern calendars are derived. It is said to have consisted originally of ten months, Martius, Aprilis, Maius, Junius, Quintilis, Sextilis, September, October, November, and December, having a total of 304 days. Numa added two months, Januarius at the beginning of the year, and Februarius at the end, making in all 355 days. He also ordered an intercalary month, Mercedinus, to be inserted every second year. Later the order of the months was changed so that January should come before February. Through abuse of power by the pontiffs to whose care it was committed, this calendar fell into confusion. It was replaced by the Julian calendar. In designating the days of the month, the Romans reckoned backward from three fixed points, the calends, the nones, and the ides. The calends were always the first day of the month. The ides fell on the 15th in March, May, July (Quintilis), and October, and on the 13th in other months. The nones came on the eighth day (the ninth, counting the ides) before the ides. Thus, Jan. 13 was called the ides of January, Jan. 12, the day before the ides, and Jan. 11, the third day before the ides (since the ides count as one), while Jan. 14 was the 19th day before the calends of February.


Wiki for Roman-calendar.

- the roman calendar changed its form several times between the founding of rome and the fall of the roman empire . or pre-julian calendar s.
- the general roman calendar is the liturgical calendar that indicates the dates of celebrations of saint s and 'mysteries of the lord '
- the calendar of saints is a traditional christian method of organizing a january, they were moved back to 7 march (see general roman calendar ).
- ancient roman fasti were calendars (fasti ) that recorded religious observances and officially commemorated events. they were typically
- this article lists the feast days of the general roman calendar as it was in 1962, following the reforms that pope john xxiii introduced
- the following is a list of the feast days of the general roman calendar as it was in 1954. it is thus basically that established by pope
- in 1955 pope pius xii made several changes to the general roman calendar of 1954 , changes that remained in force only until 1960, when
- the julian calendar was a reform of the roman calendar introduced by julius caesar in 46 bc (708 auc ). it took effect in 45 bc (709
- some of the memorials that were removed from the general roman calendar because they did not have universal significance were subsequently
- tridentine calendar is the calendar of saints to be honoured in the course of the liturgical year in the official liturgy of the roman



Help for word Roman-candle.

Roman Ro"man, a. [L. Romanus, fr. Roma Rome: cf. F. romain. Cf. Romaic, Romance, Romantic.] 1. Of or pertaining to Rome, or the Roman people; like or characteristic of Rome, the Roman people, or things done by Romans; as, Roman fortitude; a Roman aqueduct; Roman art. 2. Of or pertaining to the Roman Catholic religion; professing that religion. 3. (Print.) (a) Upright; erect; -- said of the letters or kind of type ordinarily used, as distinguished from Italic characters. (b) Expressed in letters, not in figures, as I., IV., i., iv., etc.; -- said of numerals, as distinguished from the Arabic numerals, 1, 4, etc. Roman alum (Chem.), a cubical potassium alum formerly obtained in large quantities from Italian alunite, and highly valued by dyers on account of its freedom from iron. Roman balance, a form of balance nearly resembling the modern steelyard. See the Note under Balance, n., 1. Roman candle, a kind of firework (generally held in the hand), characterized by the continued emission of shower of sparks, and the ejection, at intervals, of brilliant balls or stars of fire which are thrown upward as they become ignited. Roman Catholic, of, pertaining to, or the religion of that church of which the pope is the spiritual head; as, a Roman Catholic priest; the Roman Catholic Church. Roman cement, a cement having the property of hardening under water; a species of hydraulic cement. Roman law. See under Law. Roman nose, a nose somewhat aquiline. Roman ocher, a deep, rich orange color, transparent and durable, used by artists. --Ure. Roman order (Arch.), the composite order. See Composite, a., 2.


Wiki for Roman-candle.

- roman candle may refer to: roman candle (album), a 1994 album by elliott smith. roman candle (band), band from chapel hill, nc. roman candle
- roman candle is a traditional type of firework that ejects one or more stars or exploding shells. roman candles come in a variety of sizes
- roman candle is the debut studio album by american singer-songwriter elliott smith , recorded late 1993 and released on july 14, 1994
- roman candle is an indie rock band from chapel hill, north carolina , composed of skip matheny, logan matheny and timshel matheny.
- roman candles is a 1966 short film by filmmaker john waters starring divine , mary vivian pearce , david lochary , mink stole , and
- 'in december 2009, kill rock stars announced that it had obtained the rights to re-release roman candle and from a basement on the hill,
- the album is of a similar musical style to roman candle in its minimalist, acoustic sound. smith mostly appears alone on his acoustic
- artists as the helio sequence , hazel and pete krebs , but is most notable for releasing elliott smith 's debut album, roman candle in 1994.
- the success of roman candle and elliott smith caused tensions in the band, especially between smith and gust, and led to the band's
- gust also created the album sleeves for the elliott smith albums roman candle and elliott smith as well as the layout for either/or .



Help for word Roman-Catholic.

Roman Ro"man, a. [L. Romanus, fr. Roma Rome: cf. F. romain. Cf. Romaic, Romance, Romantic.] 1. Of or pertaining to Rome, or the Roman people; like or characteristic of Rome, the Roman people, or things done by Romans; as, Roman fortitude; a Roman aqueduct; Roman art. 2. Of or pertaining to the Roman Catholic religion; professing that religion. 3. (Print.) (a) Upright; erect; -- said of the letters or kind of type ordinarily used, as distinguished from Italic characters. (b) Expressed in letters, not in figures, as I., IV., i., iv., etc.; -- said of numerals, as distinguished from the Arabic numerals, 1, 4, etc. Roman alum (Chem.), a cubical potassium alum formerly obtained in large quantities from Italian alunite, and highly valued by dyers on account of its freedom from iron. Roman balance, a form of balance nearly resembling the modern steelyard. See the Note under Balance, n., 1. Roman candle, a kind of firework (generally held in the hand), characterized by the continued emission of shower of sparks, and the ejection, at intervals, of brilliant balls or stars of fire which are thrown upward as they become ignited. Roman Catholic, of, pertaining to, or the religion of that church of which the pope is the spiritual head; as, a Roman Catholic priest; the Roman Catholic Church. Roman cement, a cement having the property of hardening under water; a species of hydraulic cement. Roman law. See under Law. Roman nose, a nose somewhat aquiline. Roman ocher, a deep, rich orange color, transparent and durable, used by artists. --Ure. Roman order (Arch.), the composite order. See Composite, a., 2.


Wiki for Roman-Catholic.

- the catholic church, also known as the roman catholic church, is the world's largest christian church , with 1.2 billion members.
- the roman catholic church however, many others use the term to refer to other churches with historical continuity from the first millennium.
- the ministerial orders of the roman catholic church are those of bishop , presbyter (more commonly called priest in english ), and
- the term roman catholic appeared in the english language at the beginning of the 17th century, to differentiate specific groups of
- god's work is further illuminated in the marian dogmas of the roman catholic church such as the immaculate conception and the assumption
- christianity, in one form or another, is the sole state religion of the following nations: - costa rica (roman catholic denmark
- the latin church is the largest particular church within the catholic church . 'roman catholic' to mean 'latin catholic while others 'are
- the roman catholic archdiocese of detroit. (archidioecesis detroitensis. is an archdiocese of the latin rite of the catholic church
- the roman catholic church in the philippines is part of the worldwide catholic church , with its head being the pope . predominantly roman
- in the catholic church , a bishop is an ordained minister who holds see also : roman catholic (term) list of roman catholic dioceses



Help for word Roman-cement.

Roman Ro"man, a. [L. Romanus, fr. Roma Rome: cf. F. romain. Cf. Romaic, Romance, Romantic.] 1. Of or pertaining to Rome, or the Roman people; like or characteristic of Rome, the Roman people, or things done by Romans; as, Roman fortitude; a Roman aqueduct; Roman art. 2. Of or pertaining to the Roman Catholic religion; professing that religion. 3. (Print.) (a) Upright; erect; -- said of the letters or kind of type ordinarily used, as distinguished from Italic characters. (b) Expressed in letters, not in figures, as I., IV., i., iv., etc.; -- said of numerals, as distinguished from the Arabic numerals, 1, 4, etc. Roman alum (Chem.), a cubical potassium alum formerly obtained in large quantities from Italian alunite, and highly valued by dyers on account of its freedom from iron. Roman balance, a form of balance nearly resembling the modern steelyard. See the Note under Balance, n., 1. Roman candle, a kind of firework (generally held in the hand), characterized by the continued emission of shower of sparks, and the ejection, at intervals, of brilliant balls or stars of fire which are thrown upward as they become ignited. Roman Catholic, of, pertaining to, or the religion of that church of which the pope is the spiritual head; as, a Roman Catholic priest; the Roman Catholic Church. Roman cement, a cement having the property of hardening under water; a species of hydraulic cement. Roman law. See under Law. Roman nose, a nose somewhat aquiline. Roman ocher, a deep, rich orange color, transparent and durable, used by artists. --Ure. Roman order (Arch.), the composite order. See Composite, a., 2.


Wiki for Roman-cement.

- roman cement is a substance developed by james parker in the 1780s, and finally patented in 1796 'natural cement ' made by burning septaria
- a cement is a binder , a substance that sets and hardens independently, and can the word 'cement' traces to the romans , who used the term
- portland cement (often referred to as opc, from ordinary portland cement) is the 'roman cement ', which had been patented in 1796 by james
- 1778 – 20 march 1855) was an english cement manufacturer who developed to compete with parker ’s roman cement , and was similar to that
- when in 1796, james parker set up kilns on northfleet creek to make his roman cement , it was the beginning of a large complex of cement
- composites, toxic and radioactive waste encapsulation and new cements for concrete. roman cements : very simple lime cement, which hardened
- from a mixture of sand , a binder such as cement or lime , and water. the romans later improved the use and methods of making what became
- james parker was a british clergyman and cement manufacturer who invented one of covers roman cement , a term used in a 1798 pamphlet
- isaac charles johnson (28 january 1811 — 29 november 1911) was a british cement that time was producing 'artificial cement' and 'roman cement'.
- the archway road section was built by thomas telford using roman cement and gravel, an innovative technique that was used there for the