OnlineHelpWords
divine


Definition for word scope.

Aeroscope A"["e]r*o*scope, n. [A["e]ro- + Gr. ? to look out.] (Biol.) An apparatus designed for collecting spores, germs, bacteria, etc., suspended in the air., AEthrioscope [AE]"thri*o*scope, n. [Gr. ? clear + ? to observe.] An instrument consisting in part of a differential thermometer. It is used for measuring changes of temperature produced by different conditions of the sky, as when clear or clouded., Alethoscope A*leth"o*scope, n. [Gr. ? true + ? to view.] An instrument for viewing pictures by means of a lens, so as to present them in their natural proportions and relations., Altiscope Al"ti*scope, n. [L. altus high + Gr. ? to view.] An arrangement of lenses and mirrors which enables a person to see an object in spite of intervening objects., Anamorphoscope An`a*mor"pho*scope, n. [Anamorphosis + -scope.] An instrument for restoring a picture or image distorted by anamorphosis to its normal proportions. It usually consists of a cylindrical mirror., Angioscope An"gi*o*scope ([a^]n"j[i^]*[-o]*sk[=o]p), n. [Angio- + -scope.] An instrument for examining the capillary vessels of animals and plants. --Morin., Astroscope As"tro*scope, n. [Astro- + scope.] An old astronomical instrument, formed of two cones, on whose surface the constellations were delineated., Auriscope Au"ri*scope (-sk[=o]p), n. [L. auris + -scope.] (Med.) An instrument for examining the condition of the ear., Baroscope Bar"o*scope, n. [Gr. ? weight + -scope: cf. F. baroscope.] Any instrument showing the changes in the weight of the atmosphere; also, less appropriately, any instrument that indicates -or foreshadows changes of the weather, as a deep vial of liquid holding in suspension some substance which rises and falls with atmospheric changes., Cinematograph Cin`e*mat"o*graph, n. [Gr. ?, ?, motion + -graph.] 1. A machine, combining magic lantern and kinetoscope features, for projecting on a screen a series of pictures, moved rapidly (25 to 50 a second) and intermittently before an objective lens, and producing by persistence of vision the illusion of continuous motion; a moving-picture machine; also, any of several other machines or devices producing moving pictorial effects. Other common names for the cinematograph are animatograph, biograph, bioscope, electrograph, electroscope, kinematograph, kinetoscope, veriscope, vitagraph, vitascope, zo["o]gyroscope, zo["o]praxiscope, etc., Ceraunoscope Ce*rau"no*scope, n. [Gr. ? thunder and lightning + -scope.] An instrument or apparatus employed in the ancient mysteries to imitate thunder and lightning. --T. Moore., Chromascope Chro"ma*scope, n. [Gr. ? color + -scope.] An instrument for showing the optical effects of color., Chromatoscope Chro"ma*to*scope`, n. [Gr. ?, ?, color + -scope.] (Astron.) A reflecting telescope, part of which is made to rotate eccentrically, so as to produce a ringlike image of a star, instead of a point; -- used in studying the scintillation of the stars., Chronoscope Chron"o*scope, n. [Gr. ? time + -scope.] An instrument for measuring minute intervals of time; used in determining the velocity of projectiles, the duration of short-lived luminous phenomena, etc., Microscope Mi"cro*scope, n. [Micro- + -scope.] An optical instrument, consisting of a lens, or combination of lenses, for making an enlarged image of an object which is too minute to be viewed by the naked eye. Compound microscope, an instrument consisting of a combination of lenses such that the image formed by the lens or set of lenses nearest the object (called the objective) is magnified by another lens called the ocular or eyepiece. Oxyhydrogen microscope, and Solar microscope. See under Oxyhydrogen, and Solar. Simple, or Single, microscope, a single convex lens used to magnify objects placed in its focus., Compound Com"pound, a. [OE. compouned, p. p. of compounen. See Compound, v. t.] Composed of two or more elements, ingredients, parts; produced by the union of several ingredients, parts, or things; composite; as, a compound word. Compound substances are made up of two or more simple substances. --I. Watts. Compound addition, subtraction, multiplication, division (Arith.), the addition, subtraction, etc., of compound numbers. Compound crystal (Crystallog.), a twin crystal, or one seeming to be made up of two or more crystals combined according to regular laws of composition. Compound engine (Mech.), a form of steam engine in which the steam that has been used in a high-pressure cylinder is made to do further service in a larger low-pressure cylinder, sometimes in several larger cylinders, successively. Compound ether. (Chem.) See under Ether. Compound flower (Bot.), a flower head resembling a single flower, but really composed of several florets inclosed in a common calyxlike involucre, as the sunflower or dandelion. Compound fraction. (Math.) See Fraction. Compound fracture. See Fracture. Compound householder, a householder who compounds or arranges with his landlord that his rates shall be included in his rents. [Eng.] Compound interest. See Interest. Compound larceny. (Law) See Larceny. Compound leaf (Bot.), a leaf having two or more separate blades or leaflets on a common leafstalk. Compound microscope. See Microscope. Compound motion. See Motion. Compound number (Math.), one constructed according to a varying scale of denomination; as, 3 cwt., 1 qr., 5 lb.; -- called also denominate number. Compound pier (Arch.), a clustered column. Compound quantity (Alg.), a quantity composed of two or more simple quantities or terms, connected by the sign + (plus) or - (minus). Thus, a + b - c, and bb - b, are compound quantities. Compound radical. (Chem.) See Radical. Compound ratio (Math.), the product of two or more ratios; thus ab:cd is a ratio compounded of the simple ratios a:c and b:d. Compound rest (Mech.), the tool carriage of an engine lathe. Compound screw (Mech.), a screw having on the same axis two or more screws with different pitch (a differential screw), or running in different directions (a right and left screw). Compound time (Mus.), that in which two or more simple measures are combined in one; as, 6-8 time is the joining of two measures of 3-8 time. Compound word, a word composed of two or more words; specifically, two or more words joined together by a hyphen., Cyclonoscope Cy*clo"no*scope, n. [Cyclone + -scope.] An apparatus to assist in locating the center of a cyclone., Cycloscope Cy"clo*scope (s?"kl?-sk?p), n. [Cyclo- + -scope.] A machine for measuring at any moment velocity of rotation, as of a wheel of a steam engine. --Knight., Cymoscope Cy"mo*scope, n. [Gr. ? wave + -scope.] (Elec.) Any device for detecting the presence of electric waves. The influence of electric waves on the resistance of a particular kind of electric circuit, on the magnetization of steel, on the polarization of an electrolytic cell, or on the electric condition of a vacuum has been applied in the various cymoscopes., Debuscope De"bu*scope, n. [From the inventor, Debus, a French optician + -scope.] (Opt.) A modification of the kaleidoscope; -- used to reflect images so as to form beautiful designs., Dialytic Di`a*lyt"ic, a. [Gr. ?, fr. ?. See Dialysis.] Having the quality of unloosing or separating. --Clarke. Dialytic telescope, an achromatic telescope in which the colored dispersion produced by a single object lens of crown glass is corrected by a smaller concave lens, or combination of lenses, of high dispersive power, placed at a distance in the narrower part of the converging cone of rays, usually near the middle of the tube., Diaphanoscope Di`a*phan"o*scope, n. [Gr. ? transparent + -scope.] (Photog.) A dark box constructed for viewing transparent pictures, with or without a lens., Dichroiscope Di*chro"i*scope, n. Same as Dichroscope., Dichroscope Di"chro*scope, n. [Gr. di- = di`s- twice + ? color + ? to view.] An instrument for examining the dichroism of crystals., Ebullioscope E*bul"li*o*scope, n. [L. ebullire to boil up + -scope.] (Phys. Chem.) An instrument for observing the boiling point of liquids, especially for determining the alcoholic strength of a mixture by the temperature at which it boils., Echoscope Ech"o*scope, n. [Gr. ?, ?, sound + -scope.] (Med.) An instrument for intensifying sounds produced by percussion of the thorax. --Knight., Cinematograph Cin`e*mat"o*graph, n. [Gr. ?, ?, motion + -graph.] 1. A machine, combining magic lantern and kinetoscope features, for projecting on a screen a series of pictures, moved rapidly (25 to 50 a second) and intermittently before an objective lens, and producing by persistence of vision the illusion of continuous motion; a moving-picture machine; also, any of several other machines or devices producing moving pictorial effects. Other common names for the cinematograph are animatograph, biograph, bioscope, electrograph, electroscope, kinematograph, kinetoscope, veriscope, vitagraph, vitascope, zo["o]gyroscope, zo["o]praxiscope, etc., Endoscope En"do*scope, n. [Endo- + -scope.] (Med.) An instrument for examining the interior of the rectum, the urethra, and the bladder., Engiscope En"gi*scope, n. [Gr. ? near + -scope.] (Opt.) A kind of reflecting microscope. [Obs.], Equatorial E`qua*to"ri*al, n. (Astron.) An instrument consisting of a telescope so mounted as to have two axes of motion at right angles to each other, one of them parallel to the axis of the earth, and each carrying a graduated circle, the one for measuring declination, and the other right ascension, or the hour angle, so that the telescope may be directed, even in the daytime, to any star or other object whose right ascension and declination are known. The motion in right ascension is sometimes communicated by clockwork, so as to keep the object constantly in the field of the telescope. Called also an equatorial telescope. Note: The term equatorial, or equatorial instrument, is sometimes applied to any astronomical instrument which has its principal axis of rotation parallel to the axis of the earth.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for scope.

- a telescopic sight, commonly called a scope, is a sighting device that is based on an optical refracting telescope . they are equipped
- the word scope may refer to many different devices or viewing instrument s, constructed for many different purposes. it may refer to a
- see also : viewing instrument.
- in computer programming , the scope of an identifier is the part of a computer program where the identifier, a name that refers to some
- in project management , the term scope has two distinct uses- project scope and product scope. scope involves getting information required
- norfolk scope is a cultural, entertainment, convention and sports complex at the northern perimeter of downtown norfolk, virginia ,
- an oscilloscope, previously called an oscillograph and informally known as a scope, cro (for cathode-ray oscilloscope), or dso (for the
- the use and knowledge of tools , the russian band , technology (band) , other uses small yes file:astronaut-eva. jpg , by the mid 20th
- scope is a uk disability charity working with disabled people and their families in england and wales . on disability scope also
- astronomical instruments, including: theodolite s (including transits), spotting scope s, monocular s, binoculars , camera lens es, and spyglasses.


We found definition for scope you search from dictionaries , wikipedia mentions for scope.

Similar meaning for word scope.



Help for word scoped.

Abdominoscopy Ab*dom`i*nos"co*py, n. [L. abdomen + Gr. ? to examine.] (Med.) Examination of the abdomen to detect abdominal disease., Aeroscope A"["e]r*o*scope, n. [A["e]ro- + Gr. ? to look out.] (Biol.) An apparatus designed for collecting spores, germs, bacteria, etc., suspended in the air., Aeroscopy A`["e]r*os"co*py, n. [A["e]ro- + Gr. ? a looking out; ? to spy out.] The observation of the state and variations of the atmosphere., AEthrioscope [AE]"thri*o*scope, n. [Gr. ? clear + ? to observe.] An instrument consisting in part of a differential thermometer. It is used for measuring changes of temperature produced by different conditions of the sky, as when clear or clouded., Alethoscope A*leth"o*scope, n. [Gr. ? true + ? to view.] An instrument for viewing pictures by means of a lens, so as to present them in their natural proportions and relations., Altiscope Al"ti*scope, n. [L. altus high + Gr. ? to view.] An arrangement of lenses and mirrors which enables a person to see an object in spite of intervening objects., Anamorphoscope An`a*mor"pho*scope, n. [Anamorphosis + -scope.] An instrument for restoring a picture or image distorted by anamorphosis to its normal proportions. It usually consists of a cylindrical mirror., Angioscope An"gi*o*scope ([a^]n"j[i^]*[-o]*sk[=o]p), n. [Angio- + -scope.] An instrument for examining the capillary vessels of animals and plants. --Morin., Archiepiscopacy Ar`chi*e*pis"co*pa*cy, n. [Pref. archi- + episcopacy.] 1. That form of episcopacy in which the chief power is in the hands of archbishops. 2. The state or dignity of an archbishop., Archiepiscopal Ar`chi*e*pis"co*pal, a. [Pref. archi- + episcopal.] Of or pertaining to an archbishop; as, Canterbury is an archiepiscopal see., Archiepiscopality Ar`chi*e*pis`co*pal"i*ty, n. The station or dignity of an archbishop; archiepiscopacy. --Fuller., Archiepiscopate Ar`chi*e*pis"co*pate, n. [Pref. archi- + episcopate.] The office of an archbishop; an archbishopric., Astroscope As"tro*scope, n. [Astro- + scope.] An old astronomical instrument, formed of two cones, on whose surface the constellations were delineated., Stargaser Star"gas`er, n. 1. One who gazes at the stars; an astrologer; sometimes, in derision or contempt, an astronomer. 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of spiny-rayed marine fishes belonging to Uranoscopus, Astroscopus, and allied genera, of the family Uranoscopid[ae]. The common species of the Eastern United States are Astroscopus anoplus, and A. guttatus. So called from the position of the eyes, which look directly upward., Astroscopy As*tros"co*py, n. Observation of the stars. [Obs.], Auriscope Au"ri*scope (-sk[=o]p), n. [L. auris + -scope.] (Med.) An instrument for examining the condition of the ear., Auriscopy Au*ris"co*py ([add]*r[i^]s"k[-o]*p[y^]), n. Examination of the ear by the aid of the auriscope., Bacterioscopy Bac*te`ri*os"co*py, n. [Gr. ?, ?, a staff + ? to view.] Microscopic examination or investigation of bacteria. -- Bac*te`ri*o*scop"ic, a. -- *scop"ic*al*ly, adv. -- Bac*te`ri*os"co*pist, n., Bacterioscopic Bac*te`ri*o*scop"ic, a. (Biol.) Relating to bacterioscopy; as, a bacterioscopic examination., Bacterioscopy Bac*te`ri*os"co*py, n. [Gr. ?, ?, a staff + ? to view.] Microscopic examination or investigation of bacteria. -- Bac*te`ri*o*scop"ic, a. -- *scop"ic*al*ly, adv. -- Bac*te`ri*os"co*pist, n., Bacterioscopist Bac*te`ri*os"co*pist, n. (Biol.) One skilled in bacterioscopic examinations., Bacterioscopy Bac*te`ri*os"co*py, n. [Gr. ?, ?, a staff + ? to view.] Microscopic examination or investigation of bacteria. -- Bac*te`ri*o*scop"ic, a. -- *scop"ic*al*ly, adv. -- Bac*te`ri*os"co*pist, n., Bacterioscopy Bac*te`ri*os"co*py (-[o^]s"k[-o]*p[y^]), n. [Bacterium + -scopy ] (Biol.) The application of a knowledge of bacteria for their detection and identification, as in the examination of polluted water., Baroscope Bar"o*scope, n. [Gr. ? weight + -scope: cf. F. baroscope.] Any instrument showing the changes in the weight of the atmosphere; also, less appropriately, any instrument that indicates -or foreshadows changes of the weather, as a deep vial of liquid holding in suspension some substance which rises and falls with atmospheric changes., Baroscopic Bar`o*scop"ic, Baroscopical Bar`o*scop"ic*al, a. Pertaining to, or determined by, the baroscope., Baroscopic Bar`o*scop"ic, Baroscopical Bar`o*scop"ic*al, a. Pertaining to, or determined by, the baroscope., Cinematograph Cin`e*mat"o*graph, n. [Gr. ?, ?, motion + -graph.] 1. A machine, combining magic lantern and kinetoscope features, for projecting on a screen a series of pictures, moved rapidly (25 to 50 a second) and intermittently before an objective lens, and producing by persistence of vision the illusion of continuous motion; a moving-picture machine; also, any of several other machines or devices producing moving pictorial effects. Other common names for the cinematograph are animatograph, biograph, bioscope, electrograph, electroscope, kinematograph, kinetoscope, veriscope, vitagraph, vitascope, zo["o]gyroscope, zo["o]praxiscope, etc., Ceraunoscope Ce*rau"no*scope, n. [Gr. ? thunder and lightning + -scope.] An instrument or apparatus employed in the ancient mysteries to imitate thunder and lightning. --T. Moore., Cerebroscopy Cer`e*bros"co*py, n. [Cerebrum + -scopy.] (Med.) Examination of the brain for the diagnosis of disease; esp., the act or process of diagnosticating the condition of the brain by examination of the interior of the eye (as with an ophthalmoscope). --Buck., Chorepiscopal Cho`re*pis"co*pal, a. Pertaining to a chorepiscopus or his change or authority.


Wiki for scoped.

- the standard botanical author abbreviation scop. is applied to species he described. scopoli corresponded with carl linnaeus , a swedish
- a ags , scop (pronunciation: ipa : /ʃɒp/ or /skɒp was a poet as represented in old english poetry. the scop is the anglo-saxon
- scop may refer to: structural classification of proteins suprachiasmatic nucleus circadian oscillatory protein, a member of the leucine-
- the structural classification of proteins (scop) database is a largely manual classification of protein structural domain s based on
- date july 2013 co-op. file:osgco-opagm20050423 copyrightkaihsutai. jpg , the volunteer board of a retail consumers' cooperative , such as the
- the european scops owl (otus scops), also known as the eurasian scops owl or just scops owl, is a small owl . this species is a part of
- scops owls are strigidae (typical owl s) mostly belonging to the genus otus. approximately 45 living species are known, but new ones
- the oriental scops owl (otus sunia) is a species of scops owl found in south asia . they are found in dry deciduous forests.
- the african scops owl (otus senegalensis) is a small owl endemic to sub-saharan africa . the african scops owl gives a distinctive 'prrrp
- the indian scops owl (otus bakkamoena) is a resident species of owl found in the southern regions of asia from eastern arabia through the



Help for word scopel.

Scopeline Sco"pe*line, a. (Zo["o]l.) Scopeloid., Scopeloid Sco"pe*loid, a. [NL. Scopelus, typical genus (fr. Gr. ? a headland) + -oid.] (Zo["o]l.) Like or pertaining to fishes of the genus Scopelus, or family Scopelod[ae], which includes many small oceanic fishes, most of which are phosphorescent. -- n. (Zo["o]l.) Any fish of the family Scopelid[ae]., Satellite Sat"el*lite, n. [F., fr. L. satelles, -itis, an attendant.] 1. An attendant attached to a prince or other powerful person; hence, an obsequious dependent. ``The satellites of power.' --I. Disraeli. 2. (Astron.) A secondary planet which revolves about another planet; as, the moon is a satellite of the earth. See Solar system, under Solar. Satellite moth (Zo["o]l.), a handsome European noctuid moth (Scopelosoma satellitia).


Wiki for scopel.

- name silent 2 targa , logo - , image daniel_scopel_in_the_silent_cockpit. jpeg , caption a silent 2 targa fuselage with a pilot trying out
- external links : scopel. de/index. php? article_id 1 official team site. http://www. f-archiv. de/ das deutsche fußball-archiv historical german
- cast : eugenio scopel debora zanolli bárbara hang juan cruz bordeu synopsis: a story that exposes a clash between neighbors, and how these
- competition results, by rounds screening auditions: aleyson scopel. usa. andrew staupe. south korea. young-ah tak. ukraine. konstantyn travinsky
- external links : scopel, lee. research and learning center under construction at psu. daily journal of commerce , july 17, 2001.
- alliance , journal interiors , year 1996 , month october first lee , last scopel , title spotlight on interiors, designers receive
- footnotes , government_type , leader_title mayor , leader_name marcos scopel , leader_party , established_title founded , established_
- author faria jc, scopel gp, ferreira mc , title facial reanimation with masseteric nerve: babysitter or permanent procedure?
-
-
-
-



Help for word Scopeline.

Scopeline Sco"pe*line, a. (Zo["o]l.) Scopeloid.


Wiki for Scopeline.

No result from Wiki...



Help for word scopelo.

Scopeloid Sco"pe*loid, a. [NL. Scopelus, typical genus (fr. Gr. ? a headland) + -oid.] (Zo["o]l.) Like or pertaining to fishes of the genus Scopelus, or family Scopelod[ae], which includes many small oceanic fishes, most of which are phosphorescent. -- n. (Zo["o]l.) Any fish of the family Scopelid[ae]., Satellite Sat"el*lite, n. [F., fr. L. satelles, -itis, an attendant.] 1. An attendant attached to a prince or other powerful person; hence, an obsequious dependent. ``The satellites of power.' --I. Disraeli. 2. (Astron.) A secondary planet which revolves about another planet; as, the moon is a satellite of the earth. See Solar system, under Solar. Satellite moth (Zo["o]l.), a handsome European noctuid moth (Scopelosoma satellitia).


Wiki for scopelo.

- vsevolod of scopelos' (self-published), 2005- a handbook of basic bioethics: an hbto guide (editor), 2004- meltdown 2000, rdr publishers, 1999
- ecumenical reflections, which was characterized by vsevolod, the orthodox bishop of scopelos, as an invitation 'to ecumenical metanoia
- on april 8, 2001, bohdan was ordained to the deaconate by archbishop vsevolod (maidansky) of scopelos and the western eparchy of the
- (lesbos), lemnos, scopelo, skyros, syra, zea ipsera, myconi, paros, naxia, siphno, santorini and cos, where i have either collected my
- com/auctions/14973/lot/5/, private collection and 'panormos’ seashore in scopelos', p. moraitis collection, a trend he should have came in
- the republic of venice known as scopelo (1456 - 1538). the ottoman empire (1538 until the greek war of independence ). skopelos became
- greece: skopelos scopelo. sparti sparta. strymonas : fiume strimone. taygetos : monte taigeto. thasos taso. thessaloniki salonicco. thessalia



Help for word Scopeloid.

Scopeloid Sco"pe*loid, a. [NL. Scopelus, typical genus (fr. Gr. ? a headland) + -oid.] (Zo["o]l.) Like or pertaining to fishes of the genus Scopelus, or family Scopelod[ae], which includes many small oceanic fishes, most of which are phosphorescent. -- n. (Zo["o]l.) Any fish of the family Scopelid[ae].


Wiki for Scopeloid.

No result from Wiki...



Help for word scopelos.

Scopeloid Sco"pe*loid, a. [NL. Scopelus, typical genus (fr. Gr. ? a headland) + -oid.] (Zo["o]l.) Like or pertaining to fishes of the genus Scopelus, or family Scopelod[ae], which includes many small oceanic fishes, most of which are phosphorescent. -- n. (Zo["o]l.) Any fish of the family Scopelid[ae]., Satellite Sat"el*lite, n. [F., fr. L. satelles, -itis, an attendant.] 1. An attendant attached to a prince or other powerful person; hence, an obsequious dependent. ``The satellites of power.' --I. Disraeli. 2. (Astron.) A secondary planet which revolves about another planet; as, the moon is a satellite of the earth. See Solar system, under Solar. Satellite moth (Zo["o]l.), a handsome European noctuid moth (Scopelosoma satellitia).


Wiki for scopelos.

- vsevolod of scopelos' (self-published), 2005- a handbook of basic bioethics: an hbto guide (editor), 2004- meltdown 2000, rdr publishers, 1999
- on april 8, 2001, bohdan was ordained to the deaconate by archbishop vsevolod (maidansky) of scopelos and the western eparchy of the
- (lesbos), lemnos, scopelo, skyros, syra, zea ipsera, myconi, paros, naxia, siphno, santorini and cos, where i have either collected my
- ecumenical reflections, which was characterized by vsevolod, the orthodox bishop of scopelos, as an invitation 'to ecumenical metanoia
- com/auctions/14973/lot/5/, private collection and 'panormos’ seashore in scopelos', p. moraitis collection, a trend he should have came in
- the republic of venice known as scopelo (1456 - 1538). the ottoman empire (1538 until the greek war of independence ). skopelos became
- greece: skopelos scopelo. sparti sparta. strymonas : fiume strimone. taygetos : monte taigeto. thasos taso. thessaloniki salonicco. thessalia