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Definition for word should.

Shall Shall, v. i. & auxiliary. [imp. Should.] [OE. shal, schal, imp. sholde, scholde, AS. scal, sceal, I am obliged, imp. scolde, sceolde, inf. sculan; akin to OS. skulan, pres. skal, imp. skolda, D. zullen, pres. zal, imp. zoude, zou, OHG. solan, scolan, pres. scal, sol. imp. scolta, solta, G. sollen, pres. soll, imp. sollte, Icel. skulu, pres. skal, imp. skyldi, SW. skola, pres. skall, imp. skulle, Dan. skulle, pres. skal, imp. skulde, Goth. skulan, pres. skal, imp. skulda, and to AS. scyld guilt, G. schuld guilt, fault, debt, and perhaps to L. scelus crime.] Note: [Shall is defective, having no infinitive, imperative, or participle.] 1. To owe; to be under obligation for. [Obs.] ``By the faith I shall to God' --Court of Love. 2. To be obliged; must. [Obs.] ``Me athinketh [I am sorry] that I shall rehearse it her.' --Chaucer. 3. As an auxiliary, shall indicates a duty or necessity whose obligation is derived from the person speaking; as, you shall go; he shall go; that is, I order or promise your going. It thus ordinarily expresses, in the second and third persons, a command, a threat, or a promise. If the auxillary be emphasized, the command is made more imperative, the promise or that more positive and sure. It is also employed in the language of prophecy; as, ``the day shall come when . . ., ' since a promise or threat and an authoritative prophecy nearly coincide in significance. In shall with the first person, the necessity of the action is sometimes implied as residing elsewhere than in the speaker; as, I shall suffer; we shall see; and there is always a less distinct and positive assertion of his volition than is indicated by will. ``I shall go' implies nearly a simple futurity; more exactly, a foretelling or an expectation of my going, in which, naturally enough, a certain degree of plan or intention may be included; emphasize the shall, and the event is described as certain to occur, and the expression approximates in meaning to our emphatic ``I will go.' In a question, the relation of speaker and source of obligation is of course transferred to the person addressed; as, ``Shall you go?' (answer, ``I shall go'); ``Shall he go?' i. e., ``Do you require or promise his going?' (answer, ``He shall go'.) The same relation is transferred to either second or third person in such phrases as ``You say, or think, you shall go;' ``He says, or thinks, he shall go.' After a conditional conjunction (as if, whether) shall is used in all persons to express futurity simply; as, if I, you, or he shall say they are right. Should is everywhere used in the same connection and the same senses as shall, as its imperfect. It also expresses duty or moral obligation; as, he should do it whether he will or not. In the early English, and hence in our English Bible, shall is the auxiliary mainly used, in all the persons, to express simple futurity. (Cf. Will, v. t.) Shall may be used elliptically; thus, with an adverb or other word expressive of motion go may be omitted. ``He to England shall along with you.' --Shak. Note: Shall and will are often confounded by inaccurate speakers and writers. Say: I shall be glad to see you. Shall I do this? Shall I help you? (not Will I do this?) See Will., Should Should, imp. of Shall. [OE. sholde, shulde, scholde, schulde, AS. scolde, sceolde. See Shall.] Used as an auxiliary verb, to express a conditional or contingent act or state, or as a supposition of an actual fact; also, to express moral obligation (see Shall); e. g.: they should have come last week; if I should go; I should think you could go. ``You have done that you should be sorry for.' --Shak. Syn: See Ought.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for should.

- the principal english modal verbs are can, could, may, might, must, shall, should, will and would. certain other verbs are sometimes, but
- this should is found in stock phrases such as 'i should think' and 'i should expect'. ambiguity with the more common use of should to mean ought to.
- 'should i stay or should i go' is a song by the english punk rock band the clash , from their album combat rock . it was written in 1981
- 'you should be dancing' is a single by the bee gees , from the album children of the world , released in 1976. the single hit number one
- 'i should care' is a popular song by axel stordahl , paul weston and sammy cahn , published in 1944 . it first appeared in the mgm film
- 'i should be so lucky' is a song performed by australian recording artist and songwriter kylie minogue from her debut studio album kylie
- i should coco is the debut studio album by english alternative rock band supergrass , released through parlophone in may 1995.
- why should the fire die? is the third major album release and fifth album overall by progressive acoustic trio nickel creek .
- 'i should have known better' is a song composed by john lennon. sheff , 2000 , p 194 miles , 1997 , p 164 (credited to lennon–mccartney ), and
- 'that should be me' is a song by canadian recording artist justin bieber , included as the tenth and final track on his first studio album


We found definition for should you search from dictionaries , wikipedia mentions for should.

Similar meaning for word should.



Help for word shoulde.

Hump-shouldered Hump"-shoul`dered, a. Having high, hunched shoulders. --Hawthorne., Left Left, a. [OE. left, lift, luft; akin to Fries. leeft, OD. lucht, luft; cf. AS. left (equiv. to L. inanis), lyft[=a]dl palsy; or cf. AS. l[=e]f weak.] Of or pertaining to that side of the body in man on which the muscular action of the limbs is usually weaker than on the other side; -- opposed to right, when used in reference to a part of the body; as, the left hand, or arm; the left ear. Also said of the corresponding side of the lower animals. Left bank of a river, that which is on the left hand of a person whose face is turned downstream. Left bower. See under 2d Bower. Left center, the members whose sympathies are, in the main, with the members of the Left, but who do not favor extreme courses, and on occasions vote with the government. They sit between the Center and the extreme Left. Over the left shoulder, or Over the left, an old but still current colloquialism, or slang expression, used as an aside to indicate insincerity, negation, or disbelief; as, he said it, and it is true, -- over the left., Shoulder Shoul"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shouldered; p. pr. & vb. n. Shouldering.] 1. To push or thrust with the shoulder; to push with violence; to jostle. As they the earth would shoulder from her seat. --Spenser. Around her numberless the rabble flowed, Shouldering each other, crowding for a view. --Rowe. 2. To take upon the shoulder or shoulders; as, to shoulder a basket; hence, to assume the burden or responsibility of; as, to shoulder blame; to shoulder a debt. As if Hercules Or burly Atlas shouldered up their state. --Marston. Right shoulder arms (Mil.), a position in the Manual of Arms which the piece is placed on the right shoulder, with the lock plate up, and the muzzle elevated and inclined to the left, and held as in the illustration., Round-shouldered Round"-shoul`dered, a. Having the shoulders stooping or projecting; round-backed., Shoulder Shoul"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shouldered; p. pr. & vb. n. Shouldering.] 1. To push or thrust with the shoulder; to push with violence; to jostle. As they the earth would shoulder from her seat. --Spenser. Around her numberless the rabble flowed, Shouldering each other, crowding for a view. --Rowe. 2. To take upon the shoulder or shoulders; as, to shoulder a basket; hence, to assume the burden or responsibility of; as, to shoulder blame; to shoulder a debt. As if Hercules Or burly Atlas shouldered up their state. --Marston. Right shoulder arms (Mil.), a position in the Manual of Arms which the piece is placed on the right shoulder, with the lock plate up, and the muzzle elevated and inclined to the left, and held as in the illustration., Shoulder Shoul"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shouldered; p. pr. & vb. n. Shouldering.] 1. To push or thrust with the shoulder; to push with violence; to jostle. As they the earth would shoulder from her seat. --Spenser. Around her numberless the rabble flowed, Shouldering each other, crowding for a view. --Rowe. 2. To take upon the shoulder or shoulders; as, to shoulder a basket; hence, to assume the burden or responsibility of; as, to shoulder blame; to shoulder a debt. As if Hercules Or burly Atlas shouldered up their state. --Marston. Right shoulder arms (Mil.), a position in the Manual of Arms which the piece is placed on the right shoulder, with the lock plate up, and the muzzle elevated and inclined to the left, and held as in the illustration., Shouldered Shoul"dered, a. Having shoulders; -- used in composition; as, a broad-shouldered man. ``He was short-shouldered.' --Chaucer., Shoulder Shoul"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shouldered; p. pr. & vb. n. Shouldering.] 1. To push or thrust with the shoulder; to push with violence; to jostle. As they the earth would shoulder from her seat. --Spenser. Around her numberless the rabble flowed, Shouldering each other, crowding for a view. --Rowe. 2. To take upon the shoulder or shoulders; as, to shoulder a basket; hence, to assume the burden or responsibility of; as, to shoulder blame; to shoulder a debt. As if Hercules Or burly Atlas shouldered up their state. --Marston. Right shoulder arms (Mil.), a position in the Manual of Arms which the piece is placed on the right shoulder, with the lock plate up, and the muzzle elevated and inclined to the left, and held as in the illustration., Shoulder-shotten Shoul"der-shot`ten, a. Sprained in the shoulder, as a horse. --Shak.


Wiki for shoulde.

- which thing if he would doo, he shoulde haue goods inough, promising also vnto him a yearelye stipende out of the kinges treasury, so
- novel award: lynda la plante , cold shoulde. john lescroart , the 13th juror. val mcdermid , crack down. walter mosley , black betty. derek raymond
- right honorable and my verie good lorde, being to my greate griffe grief certified, how your honor by misinformacon shoulde be incensed
- of sense shoulde bee oute in the sunneshain, ane nott stucke here alle the livelong daie inn this mowldey olde by-our-lady workeshoppe. @
- they doo call lechias, that are of an exceeding gallant tast, and neuer hurteth any body, although they shoulde eate a great number of them.
- that noman shoulde knowe his owne childe, that theyre bastardes…these be they that by theire absteyning from marriage do let the
- and for my part, i would a hundred thousand of them were there, for wee are all one countrymen now, yee know; and wee shoulde finde ten
- saving that ye shoulde see that he whych in two so plain englishe wordes, and so common as in naye and no can not tell when he should
- after the accident, the accident scene shoulde be cleaned. the tram, the tracks and the overhead lines may need repair (see image:a repair
- which i shoulde heve sett first, for soe it was my will,: whose greater skill and knowledge dothe excelle all at this time: and far to



Help for word Shoulder.

Shoulder Shoul"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shouldered; p. pr. & vb. n. Shouldering.] 1. To push or thrust with the shoulder; to push with violence; to jostle. As they the earth would shoulder from her seat. --Spenser. Around her numberless the rabble flowed, Shouldering each other, crowding for a view. --Rowe. 2. To take upon the shoulder or shoulders; as, to shoulder a basket; hence, to assume the burden or responsibility of; as, to shoulder blame; to shoulder a debt. As if Hercules Or burly Atlas shouldered up their state. --Marston. Right shoulder arms (Mil.), a position in the Manual of Arms which the piece is placed on the right shoulder, with the lock plate up, and the muzzle elevated and inclined to the left, and held as in the illustration.


Wiki for Shoulder.

- the human shoulder is made up of three bones: the clavicle (collarbone), the scapula (shoulder blade), and the humerus (upper arm bone)
- a shoulder, often serving as an emergency stopping lane, is a reserved lane by the verge of a road or motorway , on the right in countries
- single or double joint lock that hyperextend s, hyperflex es date september 2012 or hyperrotates the elbow joint and/or shoulder joint .
- in human anatomy , the deltoid muscle is the muscle forming the rounded contour of the shoulder . anatomically, it appears to be made up
- the pectoral girdle or shoulder girdle is the set of bone s which connects the upper limb to the axial skeleton on each side.
- a shoulder wing (a category between high-wing and mid-wing) is a monoplane aircraft wing configuration in which the wing is mounted near
- shoulder problems including pain , are one of the more common reasons for physician visits for musculoskeletal symptoms. the shoulder is
- shoulder pads are a piece of protective equipment used in many contact sport s such as american football , canadian football , lacrosse
- the glenohumeral joint, (from ancient greek glene, eyeball, puppet, doll + -oid, 'form of', + latin humerus, shoulder) or shoulder joint
- boston butt or pork butt is a cut of pork that comes from the upper part of the shoulder from the front leg and may contain the blade bone



Help for word Shouldered.

Shoulder Shoul"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shouldered; p. pr. & vb. n. Shouldering.] 1. To push or thrust with the shoulder; to push with violence; to jostle. As they the earth would shoulder from her seat. --Spenser. Around her numberless the rabble flowed, Shouldering each other, crowding for a view. --Rowe. 2. To take upon the shoulder or shoulders; as, to shoulder a basket; hence, to assume the burden or responsibility of; as, to shoulder blame; to shoulder a debt. As if Hercules Or burly Atlas shouldered up their state. --Marston. Right shoulder arms (Mil.), a position in the Manual of Arms which the piece is placed on the right shoulder, with the lock plate up, and the muzzle elevated and inclined to the left, and held as in the illustration., Shouldered Shoul"dered, a. Having shoulders; -- used in composition; as, a broad-shouldered man. ``He was short-shouldered.' --Chaucer., Shoulder Shoul"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shouldered; p. pr. & vb. n. Shouldering.] 1. To push or thrust with the shoulder; to push with violence; to jostle. As they the earth would shoulder from her seat. --Spenser. Around her numberless the rabble flowed, Shouldering each other, crowding for a view. --Rowe. 2. To take upon the shoulder or shoulders; as, to shoulder a basket; hence, to assume the burden or responsibility of; as, to shoulder blame; to shoulder a debt. As if Hercules Or burly Atlas shouldered up their state. --Marston. Right shoulder arms (Mil.), a position in the Manual of Arms which the piece is placed on the right shoulder, with the lock plate up, and the muzzle elevated and inclined to the left, and held as in the illustration.


Wiki for Shouldered.

- the human shoulder is made up of three bones: the clavicle (collarbone), the scapula (shoulder blade), and the humerus (upper arm bone)
- a shoulder, often serving as an emergency stopping lane, is a reserved lane by the verge of a road or motorway , on the right in countries
- single or double joint lock that hyperextend s, hyperflex es date september 2012 or hyperrotates the elbow joint and/or shoulder joint .
- in human anatomy , the deltoid muscle is the muscle forming the rounded contour of the shoulder . anatomically, it appears to be made up
- the pectoral girdle or shoulder girdle is the set of bone s which connects the upper limb to the axial skeleton on each side.
- a shoulder wing (a category between high-wing and mid-wing) is a monoplane aircraft wing configuration in which the wing is mounted near
- shoulder problems including pain , are one of the more common reasons for physician visits for musculoskeletal symptoms. the shoulder is
- shoulder pads are a piece of protective equipment used in many contact sport s such as american football , canadian football , lacrosse
- the glenohumeral joint, (from ancient greek glene, eyeball, puppet, doll + -oid, 'form of', + latin humerus, shoulder) or shoulder joint
- boston butt or pork butt is a cut of pork that comes from the upper part of the shoulder from the front leg and may contain the blade bone



Help for word Shouldering.

Shoulder Shoul"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shouldered; p. pr. & vb. n. Shouldering.] 1. To push or thrust with the shoulder; to push with violence; to jostle. As they the earth would shoulder from her seat. --Spenser. Around her numberless the rabble flowed, Shouldering each other, crowding for a view. --Rowe. 2. To take upon the shoulder or shoulders; as, to shoulder a basket; hence, to assume the burden or responsibility of; as, to shoulder blame; to shoulder a debt. As if Hercules Or burly Atlas shouldered up their state. --Marston. Right shoulder arms (Mil.), a position in the Manual of Arms which the piece is placed on the right shoulder, with the lock plate up, and the muzzle elevated and inclined to the left, and held as in the illustration.


Wiki for Shouldering.

- carbon satellites are small peaks that can be seen shouldering the main peaks in an nmr spectrum . these peaks can occur in the nmr
- kind of shouldering types: the most common method of shouldering in japan is 'hira-katsugi(normal style) , 平担ぎ' the shout is 'wasshoi , wa
- a side that had problems in the ruck department with usual second-stringers cain ackland and jason blake shouldering huge responsibility.
- saint dabheog is the patron saint of lough derg , a lake in county donegal , ireland , near the town of pettigo and shouldering the
- shouldering morven is culblean, the site of the battle of culblean in 1335. running off the same hill is the burn o’ vat, here the burn
- first, in shouldering the air rifle, the student would never bend his head so as to press his cheek against the gun-stock; instead, he
- jpeg , image_size 300 px , title outskirts of paris: road with peasant shouldering a spade , artist vincent van gogh , year 1887 , type
- by 1934, godfrey, a man grown tired of shouldering the burden of the theatre, handed it over to a new company formed by norman marshall ,
- extensive publicity campaign to convince our allies, particularly the americans, that we were ‘shouldering our full share of the burdens of war’.
- the role of women in camps was enhanced by their shouldering of the main responsibility for the camps and government bureaucracy during
-



Help for word shoulders.

Shoulder Shoul"der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shouldered; p. pr. & vb. n. Shouldering.] 1. To push or thrust with the shoulder; to push with violence; to jostle. As they the earth would shoulder from her seat. --Spenser. Around her numberless the rabble flowed, Shouldering each other, crowding for a view. --Rowe. 2. To take upon the shoulder or shoulders; as, to shoulder a basket; hence, to assume the burden or responsibility of; as, to shoulder blame; to shoulder a debt. As if Hercules Or burly Atlas shouldered up their state. --Marston. Right shoulder arms (Mil.), a position in the Manual of Arms which the piece is placed on the right shoulder, with the lock plate up, and the muzzle elevated and inclined to the left, and held as in the illustration.


Wiki for shoulders.

- the human shoulder is made up of three bones: the clavicle (collarbone), the scapula (shoulder blade), and the humerus (upper arm bone)
- a shoulder, often serving as an emergency stopping lane, is a reserved lane by the verge of a road or motorway , on the right in countries
- single or double joint lock that hyperextend s, hyperflex es date september 2012 or hyperrotates the elbow joint and/or shoulder joint .
- in human anatomy , the deltoid muscle is the muscle forming the rounded contour of the shoulder . anatomically, it appears to be made up
- the pectoral girdle or shoulder girdle is the set of bone s which connects the upper limb to the axial skeleton on each side.
- a shoulder wing (a category between high-wing and mid-wing) is a monoplane aircraft wing configuration in which the wing is mounted near
- shoulder problems including pain , are one of the more common reasons for physician visits for musculoskeletal symptoms. the shoulder is
- shoulder pads are a piece of protective equipment used in many contact sport s such as american football , canadian football , lacrosse
- the glenohumeral joint, (from ancient greek glene, eyeball, puppet, doll + -oid, 'form of', + latin humerus, shoulder) or shoulder joint
- boston butt is a cut of pork that comes from the upper part of the shoulder from the front leg and may contain the blade bone boston butt