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Definition for word signed.

Adsignification Ad*sig`ni*fi*ca"tion, n. Additional signification. [R.] --Tooke., Adsignify Ad*sig"ni*fy, v. t. [L. adsignificare to show.] To denote additionally. [R.] --Tooke., Assign As*sign", n. [See Assignee.] (Law) A person to whom property or an interest is transferred; as, a deed to a man and his heirs and assigns., Assign As*sign", n. [From Assign, v.] A thing pertaining or belonging to something else; an appurtenance. [Obs.] Six French rapiers and poniards, with their assigns, as girdles, hangers, and so. --Shak., Assignability As*sign`a*bil"i*ty, n. The quality of being assignable., Assignable As*sign"a*ble, a. Capable of being assigned, allotted, specified, or designated; as, an assignable note or bill; an assignable reason; an assignable quantity., Assignat As`si`gnat" (?; 277), n. [F. assignat, fr. L. assignatus, p. p. of assignare.] One of the notes, bills, or bonds, issued as currency by the revolutionary government of France (1790-1796), and based on the security of the lands of the church and of nobles which had been appropriated by the state., Assignation As`sig*na"tion, n. [L. assignatio, fr. assignare: cf. F. assignation.] 1. The act of assigning or allotting; apportionment. This order being taken in the senate, as touching the appointment and assignation of those provinces. --Holland. 2. An appointment of time and place for meeting or interview; -- used chiefly of love interviews, and now commonly in a bad sense. While nymphs take treats, or assignations give. --Pope. 3. A making over by transfer of title; assignment. House of assignation, a house in which appointments for sexual intercourse are fulfilled., Assigner As*sign"er ([a^]s*s[imac]n"[~e]r), n. One who assigns, appoints, allots, or apportions., Assignor As`sign*or", n. [L. assignator. Cf. Assigner.] (Law) An assigner; a person who assigns or transfers an interest; as, the assignor of a debt or other chose in action., Austral Aus"tral, a. [L. australis, fr. auster: cf. F. austral.] Southern; lying or being in the south; as, austral land; austral ocean. Austral signs (Astron.), the last six signs of the zodiac, or those south of the equator., Autumnal Au*tum"nal, a. [L. auctumnalis, autumnalis: cf. F. automnal.] 1. Of, belonging to, or peculiar to, autumn; as, an autumnal tint; produced or gathered in autumn; as, autumnal fruits; flowering in autumn; as, an autumnal plant. Thick as autumnal leaves that strow the brooks In Vallombrosa. --Milton. 2. Past the middle of life; in the third stage. An autumnal matron. --Hawthorne. Autumnal equinox, the time when the sun crosses the equator, as it proceeds southward, or when it passes the autumnal point. Autumnal point, the point of the equator intersected by the ecliptic, as the sun proceeds southward; the first point of Libra. Autumnal signs, the signs Libra, Scorpio, and Sagittarius, through which the sun passes between the autumnal equinox and winter solstice., Ronchil Ron"chil, n. [Cf. Sp. ronquillo slightly hoarse.] (Zo["o]l.) An American marine food fish (Bathymaster signatus) of the North Pacific coast, allied to the tilefish. [Written also ronquil.], Block signal Block signal (Railroads) One of the danger signals or safety signals which guide the movement of trains in a block system. The signal is often so coupled with a switch that act of opening or closing the switch operates the signal also., Cardinal Car"di*nal, a. [L. cardinalis, fr. cardo the hinge of a door, that on which a thing turns or depends: cf. F. cardinal.] Of fundamental importance; pre["e]minent; superior; chief; principal. The cardinal intersections of the zodiac. --Sir T. Browne. Impudence is now a cardinal virtue. --Drayton. But cardinal sins, and hollow hearts, I fear ye. --Shak. Cardinal numbers, the numbers one, two, three, etc., in distinction from first, second, third, etc., which are called ordinal numbers. Cardinal points (a) (Geol.) The four principal points of the compass, or intersections of the horizon with the meridian and the prime vertical circle, north, south east, and west. (b) (Astrol.) The rising and setting of the sun, the zenith and nadir. Cardinal signs (Astron.) Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn. Cardinal teeth (Zo["o]l.), the central teeth of bivalve shell. See Bivalve. Cardinal veins (Anat.), the veins in vertebrate embryos, which run each side of the vertebral column and returm the blood to the heart. They remain through life in some fishes. Cardinal virtues, pre["e]minent virtues; among the ancients, prudence, justice, temperance, and fortitude. Cardinal winds, winds which blow from the cardinal points due north, south, east, or west., Consign Con*sign", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Consigned 3; p. pr. & vb. n. Consigning.] [F. consigner, L. consignare, -signatu,, to seal or sign; con- + signare, fr. signum mark. See Sign.] 1. To give, transfer, or deliver, in a formal manner, as if by signing over into the possession of another, or into a different state, with the sense of fixedness in that state, or permanence of possession; as, to consign the body to the grave. At the day of general account, good men are to be consigned over to another state. --Atterbury. 2. To give in charge; to commit; to intrust. Atrides, parting for the Trojan war, Consigned the youthful consort to his care. --Pope. The four evangelists consigned to writing that history. --Addison. 3. (Com.) To send or address (by bill of lading or otherwise) to an agent or correspondent in another place, to be cared for or sold, or for the use of such correspondent; as, to consign a cargo or a ship; to consign goods. 4. To assign; to devote; to set apart. The French commander consigned it to the use for which it was intended by the donor. --Dryden. 5. To stamp or impress; to affect. [Obs.] Consign my spirit with great fear. --Jer. Taylor. Syn: To commit; deliver; intrust; resign. See Commit., Consignatary Con*sig"na*ta*ry, n. [Cf. Consignitary.] A consignee. [Obs.] --Jenkins., Consignation Con`sig*na"tion, n. [L. consignatio written proof, document: cf. F. consignation comsignation.] 1. The act of consigning; the act of delivering or committing to another person, place, or state. [Obs.] So is despair a certain consignation to eternal ruin. --Jer. Taylor. 2. The act of ratifying or establishing, as if by signing; confirmation; ratification. A direct consignation of pardon. --Jer. Taylor. 3. A stamp; an indication; a sign. [Obs.] The most certain consignations of an excellent virtue. --Jer. Taylor., Consignatory Con*sig"na*to*ry, n. [Cf. Consignitary.] One of several that jointly sign a written instrument, as a treaty. --Fallows., Consignature Con*sig"na*ture; 135), n. Joint signature. [R.] --Colgrave., Consigne Con"signe, n. [F.] (Mil.) (a) A countersign; a watchword. (b) One who is orders to keep within certain limits., Consign Con*sign", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Consigned 3; p. pr. & vb. n. Consigning.] [F. consigner, L. consignare, -signatu,, to seal or sign; con- + signare, fr. signum mark. See Sign.] 1. To give, transfer, or deliver, in a formal manner, as if by signing over into the possession of another, or into a different state, with the sense of fixedness in that state, or permanence of possession; as, to consign the body to the grave. At the day of general account, good men are to be consigned over to another state. --Atterbury. 2. To give in charge; to commit; to intrust. Atrides, parting for the Trojan war, Consigned the youthful consort to his care. --Pope. The four evangelists consigned to writing that history. --Addison. 3. (Com.) To send or address (by bill of lading or otherwise) to an agent or correspondent in another place, to be cared for or sold, or for the use of such correspondent; as, to consign a cargo or a ship; to consign goods. 4. To assign; to devote; to set apart. The French commander consigned it to the use for which it was intended by the donor. --Dryden. 5. To stamp or impress; to affect. [Obs.] Consign my spirit with great fear. --Jer. Taylor. Syn: To commit; deliver; intrust; resign. See Commit., Consignee Con`sign*ee" (?; 277), n. [F. consign?, p. p. of consigner.] The person to whom goods or other things are consigned; a factor; -- correlative to consignor. Consigner and consignee are used by merchants to express generally the shipper of merchandise, and the person to whom it is addressed, by bill of lading or otherwise. --De Colange., Consigner Con*sign"er, n. One who consigns. See Consignor., Consignor Con*sign"or (? or ?; 277), n. One who consigns something to another; -- opposed to consignee. [Written also consigner.], Consignificant Con`sig*nif"i*cant, a. Having joint or equal signification; synonymous. [R.] --Spelman., Consignification Con*sig`ni*fi*ca"tion, n. Joint signification. [R.], Consignificative Con`sig*nif"i*ca*tive, a. Consignificant; jointly significate. [R.], Consignify Con*sig"ni*fy, v. t. [Pref. con- + sognify.] To signify or denote in combination with something else. The cipher . . . only serves to connote and consignify, and to change the value or the figures. --Horne Tooke., Consign Con*sign", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Consigned 3; p. pr. & vb. n. Consigning.] [F. consigner, L. consignare, -signatu,, to seal or sign; con- + signare, fr. signum mark. See Sign.] 1. To give, transfer, or deliver, in a formal manner, as if by signing over into the possession of another, or into a different state, with the sense of fixedness in that state, or permanence of possession; as, to consign the body to the grave. At the day of general account, good men are to be consigned over to another state. --Atterbury. 2. To give in charge; to commit; to intrust. Atrides, parting for the Trojan war, Consigned the youthful consort to his care. --Pope. The four evangelists consigned to writing that history. --Addison. 3. (Com.) To send or address (by bill of lading or otherwise) to an agent or correspondent in another place, to be cared for or sold, or for the use of such correspondent; as, to consign a cargo or a ship; to consign goods. 4. To assign; to devote; to set apart. The French commander consigned it to the use for which it was intended by the donor. --Dryden. 5. To stamp or impress; to affect. [Obs.] Consign my spirit with great fear. --Jer. Taylor. Syn: To commit; deliver; intrust; resign. See Commit.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for signed.

- the dollar or peso sign ($) is a symbol primarily used to indicate the various peso and dollar units of currency around the world.
- from a semantic perspective this creates uncertainty about what exactly has been signed. wysiwys (what you see is what you sign means
- the at sign, @, normally read aloud as 'at', also commonly called the at symbol or commercial at, and less commonly a wide range of other
- per se ('by itself it was also common practice to add the '&' sign at the end of the alphabet as if it were the 27th letter, pronounced and.
- a sign is a representation of an object that implies a connection between itself and its object. a natural sign bears a causal relation to
- the copyright symbol, or copyright sign, designated by © (a circled capital letter 'c '), is the symbol used in copyright notices for
- a sign is an entity which indicates another entity. sign may also refer to: commercial signage signage sign (semiotics) sign (linguistics)
- a sign language (also signed language or simply signing) is a language which uses manual communication and body language to convey
- traffic signs or road signs are signs erected at the side of or above road s to give instructions or provide information to road users.
- a medical sign is an objective indication of some medical fact or characteristic that may be detected by a physician during a physical


We found definition for signed you search from dictionaries , wikipedia mentions for signed.

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Help for word signeded.

Consign Con*sign", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Consigned 3; p. pr. & vb. n. Consigning.] [F. consigner, L. consignare, -signatu,, to seal or sign; con- + signare, fr. signum mark. See Sign.] 1. To give, transfer, or deliver, in a formal manner, as if by signing over into the possession of another, or into a different state, with the sense of fixedness in that state, or permanence of possession; as, to consign the body to the grave. At the day of general account, good men are to be consigned over to another state. --Atterbury. 2. To give in charge; to commit; to intrust. Atrides, parting for the Trojan war, Consigned the youthful consort to his care. --Pope. The four evangelists consigned to writing that history. --Addison. 3. (Com.) To send or address (by bill of lading or otherwise) to an agent or correspondent in another place, to be cared for or sold, or for the use of such correspondent; as, to consign a cargo or a ship; to consign goods. 4. To assign; to devote; to set apart. The French commander consigned it to the use for which it was intended by the donor. --Dryden. 5. To stamp or impress; to affect. [Obs.] Consign my spirit with great fear. --Jer. Taylor. Syn: To commit; deliver; intrust; resign. See Commit., Countersign Coun`ter*sign" (-s?n`; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Countersigned (-s?nd`); p. pr. & vb. n. Countersigning.] [Counter- + sign: cf. F. contresigner.] To sign on the opposite side of (an instrument or writing); hence, to sign in addition to the signature of a principal or superior, in order to attest the authenticity of a writing., Designedly De*sign"ed*ly, adv. By design; purposely; intentionally; -- opposed to accidentally, ignorantly, or inadvertently., Preconsign Pre`con*sign", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Preconsigned; p. pr. & vb. n. Preconsigning.] To consign beforehand; to make a previous consignment of., Resigned Re*signed" (r?-z?nd"), a. Submissive; yielding; not disposed to resist or murmur. A firm, yet cautious mind; Sincere, thought prudent; constant, yet resigned. --Pope., Resignedly Re*sign"ed*ly (r?-z?n"?d-l?), adv. With submission., Subsign Sub*sign", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Subsigned; p. pr. & vb. n. Subsigning.] [L. subsignare; sub under + signare to mark: cf. F. soussigner. See Sign.] To sign beneath; to subscribe. [R.] --Camden.


Wiki for signeded.

- zero real number to be positive or negative . zero itself is signless, although in some contexts it makes sense to consider a signed zero .
- if this is the case it can sometimes give the artist greater freedom than if they were signed directly to the big label. there are many
- a sign language (also signed language or simply signing) is a language which uses manual communication and body language to convey
- it has been estimated that roughly one hundred and ten electronic contracts are signed every second. date april 2013 elements: at common law,
- nations, such as australia , the governor-general merely signs the bill. date when the letters patent are signed, or when they are
- a few acts, such as madonna , michael jackson , u2 , and janet jackson , among others, have signed multimillion-dollar deals. whitney
- conference committees- no bill can be sent to the white house to be signed into law unless it passes through both chambers in original
- american sign language (asl) is the predominant sign language of deaf communities superiority of spoken language to signed language,
- success confirms the message is unmodified since it was signed, and – presuming the signer's private key has remained secret to the signer
- general douglas macarthur rarely signed a wwii condolence letter personally and all of his letters to families were signed by one of two