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Definition for word those.

Those Those, pron. [OE. [thorn]os, [thorn]as, AS. [eth][=a]s, nom. and acc. pl. of [eth][=e]s this. See This, and cf. These.] The plural of that. See That.


Explination we found from Wikipedia for those.

- those may refer to: those, plural english distal demonstrative , (the plural of the word that) those, nepal.
- in 451 those who accepted the council of chalcedon similarly classified those who rejected it as monophysite heretics. the churches that
- washington and arizona, except for those in internment camps in 1944, the supreme court upheld the constitutionality of the exclusion
- bloomsbury (disambiguation) , country england , map_type greater london , region london , population , official_name bloomsbury , latitude
- file:mt banner and thousand island lake. jpg , the wilderness act protects exceptional undisturbed natural areas and scenery, such as in the
- in molecular geometry , bond length or bond distance is the average distance between nuclei of two bonded atom s in a molecule .
- image:world population density map. png , population density (people per km sup 2/sup) by country this is a list of countries and
- image:abra alba 2.jpg , two whole shells, one closed and one open, of the marine bivalve abra alba image:nz cockles. jpg , live marine
- some of its beliefs, such as those concerning genius loci spirits and many other beings classified between gods and humans, are
- those who agree with this criticism argue it is a refutation of socialism and that it shows that a socialist planned economy could


We found definition for those you search from dictionaries , wikipedia mentions for those.

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Help for word thosed.

Alethoscope A*leth"o*scope, n. [Gr. ? true + ? to view.] An instrument for viewing pictures by means of a lens, so as to present them in their natural proportions and relations., Anorthosite A*nor"tho*site, n. [F. anorthose triclinic feldspar (fr. Gr. ? priv. + ? straight) + -ite.] (Petrol.) A granular igneous rock composed almost exclusively of a soda-lime feldspar, usually labradorite., Bathos Ba"thos, n. [Gr. ? depth, fr. ? deep.] (Rhet.) A ludicrous descent from the elevated to the low, in writing or speech; anticlimax., Benthos Ben"thos, n. [NL., fr. Gr. ? depth of the sea.] The bottom of the sea, esp. of the deep oceans; hence (Bot. & Zo["o]l.), the fauna and flora of the sea bottom; -- opposed to plankton., Boothose Boot"hose`, n. 1. Stocking hose, or spatterdashes, in lieu of boots. --Shak. 2. Hose made to be worn with boots, as by travelers on horseback. --Sir W. Scott., Ethos E"thos, n. [L., fr. Gr. ? character. See Ethic.] 1. The character, sentiment, or disposition of a community or people, considered as a natural endowment; the spirit which actuates manners and customs; also, the characteristic tone or genius of an institution or social organization. 2. ([AE]sthetics) The traits in a work of art which express the ideal or typic character -- character as influenced by the ethos (sense 1) of a people -- rather than realistic or emotional situations or individual character in a narrow sense; -- opposed to pathos., Feldspathic Feld*spath"ic, Feldspathose Feld*spath"ose, a. Pertaining to, or consisting of, feldspar., Honey Hon"ey, n. [OE. honi, huni, AS. hunig; akin to OS. honeg, D. & G. honig, OHG. honag, honang, Icel. hunang, Sw. h[*a]ning, Dan. honning, cf. Gr. ? dust, Skr. kaa grain.] 1. A sweet viscid fluid, esp. that collected by bees from flowers of plants, and deposited in the cells of the honeycomb. 2. That which is sweet or pleasant, like honey. The honey of his language. --Shak. 3. Sweet one; -- a term of endearment. --Chaucer. Honey, you shall be well desired in Cyprus. --Shak. Note: Honey is often used adjectively or as the first part of compound; as, honeydew or honey dew; honey guide or honeyguide; honey locust or honey-locust. Honey ant (Zo["o]l.), a small ant (Myrmecocystus melliger), found in the Southwestern United States, and in Mexico, living in subterranean formicares. There are larger and smaller ordinary workers, and others, which serve as receptacles or cells for the storage of honey, their abdomens becoming distended to the size of a currant. These, in times of scarcity, regurgitate the honey and feed the rest. Honey badger (Zo["o]l.), the ratel. Honey bear. (Zo["o]l.) See Kinkajou. Honey buzzard (Zo["o]l.), a bird related to the kites, of the genus Pernis. The European species is P. apivorus; the Indian or crested honey buzzard is P. ptilorhyncha. They feed upon honey and the larv[ae] of bees. Called also bee hawk, bee kite. Honey creeper (Zo["o]l.), one of numerous species of small, bright, colored, passerine birds of the family C[oe]rebid[ae], abundant in Central and South America. Honey easter (Zo["o]l.), one of numerous species of small passerine birds of the family Meliphagid[ae], abundant in Australia and Oceania; -- called also honeysucker. Honey flower (Bot.), an evergreen shrub of the genus Melianthus, a native of the Cape of Good Hope. The flowers yield much honey. Honey guide (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of small birds of the family Indicatorid[ae], inhabiting Africa and the East Indies. They have the habit of leading persons to the nests to wild bees. Called also honeybird, and indicator. Honey harvest, the gathering of honey from hives, or the honey which is gathered. --Dryden. Honey kite. (Zo["o]l.) See Honey buzzard (above). Honey locust (Bot.), a North American tree (Gleditschia triacanthos), armed with thorns, and having long pods with a sweet pulp between the seeds. Honey month. Same as Honeymoon. Honey weasel (Zo["o]l.), the ratel., Gnathostoma Gna*thos"to*ma, n. pl. [NL., from Gr. ? the jaw + ?, ?, the mouth.] (Zo["o]l.) A comprehensive division of vertebrates, including all that have distinct jaws, in contrast with the leptocardians and marsipobranchs (Cyclostoma), which lack them. [Written also Gnathostomata.], Gnathostoma Gna*thos"to*ma, n. pl. [NL., from Gr. ? the jaw + ?, ?, the mouth.] (Zo["o]l.) A comprehensive division of vertebrates, including all that have distinct jaws, in contrast with the leptocardians and marsipobranchs (Cyclostoma), which lack them. [Written also Gnathostomata.], Lithosian Li*tho"sian, n. [From NL. Lithosia, the typical genus, fr. Gr. li`qos a stone, a rock.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of various species of moths belonging to the family Lithosid[ae]. Many of them are beautifully colored., Puccoon Puc*coon", n. [From the American Indian name.] (Bot.) Any one of several plants yielding a red pigment which is used by the North American Indians, as the bloodroot and two species of Lithospermum (L. hirtum, and L. canescens); also, the pigment itself., Lithosphere Lith"o*sphere, n. [Litho- + sphere.] (Phys. Geog.) (a) The solid earth as distinguished from its fluid envelopes, the hydrosphere and atmosphere. (b) The outer part of the solid earth, the portion undergoing change through the gradual transfer of material by volcanic eruption, the circulation of underground water, and the process of erosion and deposition. It is, therefore, regarded as a third mobile envelope comparable with the hydrosphere and atmosphere., Megalethoscope Meg`a*leth"o*scope, n. [Mega- + alethoscope.] An optical apparatus in which pictures are viewed through a large lens with stereoptical effects. It is often combined with the stereoscope., Ornithosauria Or*ni`tho*sau"ri*a, n. pl. [NL. See Ornitho-, and Sauria.] (Paleon.) An order of extinct flying reptiles; -- called also Pterosauria., Pterosauria Pter`o*sau"ri*a, n. pl. [NL.] (Paleon.) An extinct order of flying reptiles of the Mesozoic age; the pterodactyls; -- called also Pterodactyli}, and Ornithosauria}. Note: The wings were formed, like those of bats, by a leathery expansion of the skin, principally supported by the greatly enlarged outer or `` little' fingers of the hands. The American Cretaceous pterodactyls had no teeth. See Pteranodontia, and Pterodactyl., Ornithoscelida Or*ni`tho*scel"i*da, n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. ?, ?, a bird + ? a leg.] (Zo["o]l.) A group of extinct Reptilia, intermediate in structure (especially with regard to the pelvis) between reptiles and birds. -- Or`ni*tho*scel"i*dan, a., Ornithoscelida Or*ni`tho*scel"i*da, n. pl. [NL., fr. Gr. ?, ?, a bird + ? a leg.] (Zo["o]l.) A group of extinct Reptilia, intermediate in structure (especially with regard to the pelvis) between reptiles and birds. -- Or`ni*tho*scel"i*dan, a., Ornithoscopy Or`ni*thos"co*py, n. [Ornitho- + -scopy: cf. Gr. ? divination from birds.] Observation of birds and their habits. [R.] --De Quincey., Orthoscope Or"tho*scope, n. [Ortho- + -scope.] (Physyol.) An instrument designed to show the condition of the superficial portions of the eye., Orthoscopic Or`tho*scop"ic, a. (Opt.) Giving an image in correct or normal proportions; giving a flat field of view; as, an orthoscopic eyepiece., Orthosilicic Or`tho*si*lic"ic, a. [Ortho- + silicic.] (Chem.) Designating the form of silicic acid having the normal or highest number of hydroxyl groups., Silicic Si*lic"ic, a. [L. silex, silicis, a flint: cf. F. silicique.] (Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or resembling, silica; specifically, designating compounds of silicon; as, silicic acid. Silicic acid (Chem.), an amorphous gelatinous substance, Si(HO)4, very unstable and easily dried to silica, but forming many stable salts; -- called also orthosilicic, or normal silicic, acid., Orthospermous Or`tho*sper"mous, a. [Ortho- + Gr. ? seed.] (Bot.) Having the seeds straight, as in the fruits of some umbelliferous plants; -- opposed to c[oe]lospermous. --Darwin., Orthostichy Or*thos"ti*chy, n.; pl. Orthostichies. [Ortho- + Gr. ? row.] (Bot.) A longitudinal rank, or row, of leaves along a stem., Orthostichy Or*thos"ti*chy, n.; pl. Orthostichies. [Ortho- + Gr. ? row.] (Bot.) A longitudinal rank, or row, of leaves along a stem., Pathos Pa"thos, n. 1. The quality or character of those emotions, traits, or experiences which are personal, and therefore restricted and evanescent; transitory and idiosyncratic dispositions or feelings as distinguished from those which are universal and deep-seated in character; -- opposed to ethos. 2. Suffering; the enduring of active stress or affliction., Pathos Pa"thos, n. [L., from Gr. pa`qos a suffering, passion, fr. ?, ?, to suffer; cf. ? toil, L. pati to suffer, E. patient.] That quality or property of anything which touches the feelings or excites emotions and passions, esp., that which awakens tender emotions, such as pity, sorrow, and the like; contagious warmth of feeling, action, or expression; pathetic quality; as, the pathos of a picture, of a poem, or of a cry. The combination of incident, and the pathos of catastrophe. --T. Warton., Polyanthus Pol`y*an"thus, n.; pl. Polyanthuses. [NL., fr. Gr. ? rich in flowers; poly`s many + ? flower.] [Written also polyanthos.] (Bot.) (a) The oxlip. So called because the peduncle bears a many-flowered umbel. See Oxlip. (b) A bulbous flowering plant of the genus Narcissus (N. Tazetta, or N. polyanthus of some authors). See Illust. of Narcissus., Portass Por"tass, n. [OF. porte-hors a kind of prayer book, so called from being portable; cf. LL. portiforium.] A breviary; a prayer book. [Written variously portace, portasse, portesse, portise, porthose, portos, portus, portuse, etc.] [Obs.] --Spenser. Camden. By God and by this porthors I you swear. --Chaucer.


Wiki for thosed.

- to place these species into a new separate genus, thos, after the classical greek word grc , θώς 'jackal', but his theory had little
- thomas. thomas may refer to: people : thomas (name), a masculine given name. thomas (surname) thomas the apostle , see also saint thomas
- tho may refer to: jeff tho , badminton player from australia. tho language , multiple languages. thổ may refer to: thổ people , ethnic group
- the thổ ethnic group (also keo, mon, cuoi, ho, tay poong) inhabits the mountainous regions of northern vietnam , mainly nghệ an province
- nguyễn ngọc thơ (born 26 may 1908) is a vietnamese politician who was the first th��'s rule was marked by a period of confusion and weak
- they are sometimes also called thô, t'o, tai tho, ngan, phen, thu lao, or pa di. there are about 1.5 million tày people living in vietnam.
- cuói, known as thổ in vietnam and as hung in laos,http://sealang. net/mk/vietic. htm is a dialect cluster spoken by around 70,000 people in
- clubname thanh hóa , image image:logo ls thanh hoa copy. jpg , 190px fullname thanh hóa football club , nickname , founded 2009 , ground
- date april 2010 thompson international speedway in thompson, connecticut , usa, is a 5/8 , mi , adj on paved oval racetrack that was once
- clubname thai honda fc , image file:thaihonda2010. svg , 180px fullname thai honda football club , nickname eagle kings (พญาอินทรี) ,



Help for word thoses.

Those Those, pron. [OE. [thorn]os, [thorn]as, AS. [eth][=a]s, nom. and acc. pl. of [eth][=e]s this. See This, and cf. These.] The plural of that. See That.


Wiki for thoses.

- those may refer to: those, plural english distal demonstrative , (the plural of the word that) those, nepal.
- in 451 those who accepted the council of chalcedon similarly classified those who rejected it as monophysite heretics. the churches that
- washington and arizona, except for those in internment camps in 1944, the supreme court upheld the constitutionality of the exclusion
- bloomsbury (disambiguation) , country england , map_type greater london , region london , population , official_name bloomsbury , latitude
- the president by july 1, 1980 recommendations on those areas 'formally identified as natural or primitive areas' prior to november 1, 1975.
- in molecular geometry , bond length or bond distance is the average distance between nuclei of two bonded atom s in a molecule .
- image:world population density map. png , population density (people per km sup 2/sup) by country this is a list of countries and
- image:abra alba 2.jpg , two whole shells, one closed and one open, of the marine bivalve abra alba image:nz cockles. jpg , live marine
- some of its beliefs, such as those concerning genius loci spirits and many other beings classified between gods and humans, are
- those who agree with this criticism argue it is a refutation of socialism and that it shows that a socialist planned economy could